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27

Draw with insufficient material is covered in article 9.6: The game is drawn when a position is reached from which a checkmate cannot occur by any possible series of legal moves, even with the most unskilled play. With a given material, it is possible to construct a checkmate (assuming your cooperation or horrible blunders), so it is not a draw.


27

As I commented, there are several reasons why people play fast, among them: One of the reasons I often see is fear of time trouble. Many amateurs are not really aware of whether the time they have left will "be enough", so start to move way too fast early on. They won't feel confident to play faster games either for that same reason. It could be the case ...


23

Worst-case scenario: Upgraded all your pawns to knights Your king is at Ka8 Your knights surround your king, so at Nb8, Na7 and Nb7 Opposition knight is at Nc7# - checkmate! So it is indeed possible to lose, thus not a draw.


19

It is important to realize that chess is a zero-sum game*. In other words, everything that gives advantage to one player gives an equal disadvantage to the other player. So if adding 2 minutes to your opponent's clock benefits you, then it would be harmful to your opponent. It is not possible for any decision of the arbiter to give an advantage to your ...


17

I see it all the time on the net It also happens a lot over the board. There are two main reasons players play the moves very fast when they have a lot of time: They are in their preparation and the game may conclude (with a win or pre-arranged draw) before they leave their preparation. You often see this at the highest levels. They are sufficiently far ...


14

That indicates slightly more than just the time control: 6SS indicates a 6-round Swiss system tournament. 40/120 indicates that each side will have 120 minutes to make the first 40 moves of the game. sd30 indicates that after the first 40-move time control is met, each side will have an additional 30 minutes for the remainder of the game ("sd" = sudden ...


13

This is opinion based and therefore not a great fit for the Stack Exchange format, but here are my thoughts anyway. The lower the time limit, the more acceptable it is from a sportsmanship view. In standard long time controls, this is really poor form. In 1-minute ("bullet"), anything goes, including this. The reasoning is that in these really fast forms of ...


13

but that will not affect the game due to his/her hopeless position Well, if your opponent has a hopeless position, they would be better off accepting the 'automatic' draw offer which is implied whenever you make this request: "This constitutes the offer of a draw." Therefore, invoking this III.4 rule is only beneficial if you have a worse position and very ...


12

I think the biggest reason is that using your time efficiently is an acquired skill just as learning tactics is. When you are not as strong, you do not know as much, and thus, you do not have as much to think about. As you acquire more overall chess skill, you have more to think about, and thus, you spend more time thinking. It is also a matter of practice. ...


10

The FIDE-approved classical time control is: (taken from the handbook) 07 Time Control There is a single time control for all major FIDE events: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move starting from move one. This time control is used in many major chess events such as the ...


9

From FIDE Laws of Chess (2018 version): 6.9 Except where one of Articles 5.1.1, 5.1.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 applies, if a player does not complete the prescribed number of moves in the allotted time, the game is lost by that player. However, the game is drawn if the position is such that the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible ...


9

It's also a possible strategy to play with the opponent's mind by playing quick and ideal (or unexpected) moves, though it can be very risky and backfire. Depending on how mentally strong a player is, seeing a few quick and ideal moves done in a succession by the opponent may pressure their mind. If they cannot cope up with the pressure, a blunder may be ...


8

On Lichess there is a button that allows you to give 15 seconds to your opponent. You could use it to just give a bunch of extra minutes to your friend at the start of a game.


7

Yes. A grandmaster or a team of grandmasters can hold a draw or win against an engine when given time odds. I think that there is a minimum time control at which an engine can perform equally good or better than a grandmaster (without time odds). I guess this number is somewhere around 2 or 3 minutes for the whole game. Let's say for simplicity that it is ...


7

Not only does lichess.org has the option to berserk in 1m bullet-games, but after a recent update you are able to to start a 30sec game. You will learn nothing though.


7

This question will receive more opinionated answers regarding the time control, I will answer in perspective of an advanced beginner Chess player. Since you have said you are a beginner and never played in a tournament before, I would suggest you to have 1 hour or 45mins + 45sec increment time control. This is because of my previous answer here: Do longer ...


7

lichess gets it wrong. As it happens, White would lose all three games. With all white pieces still on the board, black has still "enough mating material" - it would actually help if White had no pieces at all! I guess we all agree in the following position black is checkmate: 5k1K/5n1P/8/8/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1 But this position can be reached from the ...


7

The clocks would start at 90 minutes, with 30 seconds added per move, starting at move one. When move 40 (not 20 - we're counting full moves, not half moves) is completed, 30 minutes would be added (along with the 30 seconds that's added for every move.) Events would ordinarily state what time control they are using. If it's not on the list of major ...


6

I am currently doing some research on the subject and hopefully can provide a more complete answer later, but apparently Capablanca did not invest much time. As he said (extracted from this compilation) about his tenth move: I thought for a little while before playing this, knowing that I would be subjected thereafter to a terrific attack, all the lines ...


6

As others mentioned, you cannot get the draw because you can still get checkmated. In fact I have actually seen this kind of position get lost in practice, as follows: You are on Ka8 and have just played a7 pawn (knight, rook or even bishop have very similar effect and could be obtained via promotion), opponents king is on Kc8 or Kc7 and opponent plays ...


6

You don't have grounds to demand the time control you like. In practice I suppose that if your opponent agrees, you could get away with using whatever time control you both want as long as the game finishes on time, which is the main point the organizers care about. One thing that the USCF rules do cover is what to do if the stipulated time control has a ...


5

Although replies by Brian Towers and StudentT are the right ones (both players would be discalified) from a theoretical points of view it would be possible that a game has not ended in time for the next round to begin. I would even say that it's possible that it could actually happen in a tournament with 3 rounds per day. I case it would happen I guess the ...


5

Playing is not how you improve. Playing is how you demonstrate your skill. From a training point of view, playing a lot of games is more a less a waste of time compared to other training and study activities. Playing is fun, but if you want to improve you need to train. You need to decide: do I want to play and have fun, or do I want to work and improve?


5

According to my copy of US Chess Federation's Official Rules of Chess (5th Edition), rule 14B2 states: If a player offers a draw while the opponent's clock is running, the opponent may accept or reject the offer. A player who offers a draw in this manner may be warned or penalized for annoying the opponent (20G). Note that it says "may", not "must". ...


5

Very simple. Move quickly (faster than the increment) and you end up with more time. Over the course of a dozen or so quickly made moves you can build up enough time to allow for another serious think if required. With delay you can never get more time. Once in zeitnot you are permanently in zeitnot.


5

At those timescales, communication between computers becomes a problem. For instance, it takes more than a millisecond (10-3 s) for me to ping my router. Even if you install a sort of timekeeper program on the computer itself, CPU clocks aren't reliable on such small timescales. Instead, it might be more interesting to run them on slower hardware.


5

From the lichess.org FAQ: In the event of one player running out of time, that player will usually lose the game. However, the game is drawn if the position is such that the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible series of legal moves (FIDE handbook §6.9). Note that it can be possible to mate with a single knight or bishop if the ...


5

You are close, but not quite right. I just spoke with a friend of mine, who has been a tournament director for over 40 years, USCF Senior TD Henry L. Terrie III (Hal Terrie). He told me that when you post a USCF tournament, you need to specify the delay, or it is assumed to be 5 seconds. So, while you cannot demand G/25 d5, you can demand G/30 d5 since it ...


4

Your question is stated in such a way, that the answer Yes is almost certain. And I will explain why. First of all, from mathematical (game theory) point of view, chess is an extensive-form game, which means that it has a Nash equilibrium. Taken these hard words away, this means that from a theoretical point of view, with a perfect game if a game is not a ...


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