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25

Basically, no. It was co-authored by Stuart Margulies and Don Mosenfelder, and while Fischer may have contributed a little, it is generally accepted that he just lent his name to the project. Soltis, Andrew (2003). Bobby Fischer Rediscovered. B.T. Batsford Ltd. p. 10. ISBN 0-7134-8846-8.


17

In pretty much any endeavor that requires one to develop or acquire complex sets of skills, be it chiefly intellectual or chiefly physical, starting young will generally be a huge boon simply because of the fact that younger brains are more plastic than older brains; they can more readily adapt to new sorts of tasks and information. Because of that fact, ...


17

This is a very famous position. Well, here are some reasons, and there are quite a few: Since this was a Candidate’s Match to qualify to play Spassky, it comes down to exact calculation above all. Fischer calculated that it was good, and his judgement bore out since the game only lasted another 12 moves. Here are some things that probably contributed to ...


17

From Quora: What was Bobby Fischer's IQ? (2018): Short answer: In 1958, when Fischer sat a Stanford-Binet test at the age of 15, his score was 180-187. But in today’s terms, Bobby Fischer’s IQ should be 148–155 on the Fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet test, and 150-160 on the WISC-V/WAIS-IV tests administered by Mensa. The only reference provided for ...


16

Taking a look at the comments in your link, I came across a post quoting GM Edmar Mednis: A move which was invariably given two exclamation marks - 14.Nb1!! after the game. May I respectfully suggest that if Spassky had proceeded to lose this game it would have read 14.Nb1?? If we look at the nature of the position, it should be apparent that ...


13

King's Gambit: A Son, A Father, and the World's Most Dangerous Game is about this. The age-old question is: Does chess make you mentally ill or are mentally ill people attracted to chess? Chess has the highest suicide rate of any sport by a long-shot. Many chess world champions were mentally ill. There's a whole bunch of other supporting facts about chess ...


12

What would be a more in-depth explanation of why capturing with the queen is a bad idea? If White retakes with the Queen he loses a piece, and stays in horrible position that is 100% lost. Below is the illustration: [Title "Capturing with the queen loses a piece in all lines"] [fen "r2q1rk1/pp2ppbp/2p2np1/6B1/3PP1b1/Q1n2N2/PP3PPP/3RKB1R w - - ...


12

Nobody knows who he played, because nobody has come forward to take credit; however, some chess sleuths compared the moves against various engines and found that there was considerable evidence to support a particular engine (I believe it was called "blitz tiger") as the mysterious Fischer. Because of the incident where Short chatted with Fischer, there ...


12

The "Game of the Century" was a term coined by Hans Kmoch in Chess Review. In short it was a bit of sensationalism. While Fischer did show a talent for combinations and an impressive sacrifice, the real importance of the game was the story of a leading chess master vs a phenomenal prodigy about to begin his historic rise. Still, it's helpful to note what ...


12

It's still one of the best moves White can play. There's no clear consensus on whether 1.e4 or 1.d4 is better, but it's played frequently at the top level. Due to advancements in theory, I'd say 1.e4 isn't regarded quite as highly as it was in the past, but again it's most likely White's best/second best move. Advancements in AI aren't really affecting ...


11

Aside from the fact that the difference is only .3% at master level games on chess.com's db, I think Fischer was referring to his own personal results. A search on chess tempo for Fischer's games reveals that this is the case: http://chesstempo.com/gamedb/player/239563 e4 (51.3% win) d4 (15.4% win) update: The statistics above are skewed because Fischer ...


11

Wilhelm Steinitz learned "how" to play chess at the age of 12, but it was only after attending the Vienna Polytechnic that he actually began to play serious chess (sometime during his twenties). Siegbert Tarrasch learned how to play chess when he was 15, but he was 20 when he first tried himself at a "Hauptturneier" (Chess Tournament) in 1882 at Berlin, he ...


11

There was a time when the FIDE rules didn't specify that a king and rook need to be on the same rank in order to castle. This meant that, assuming the other requirements for castling were met, it was legal for White to castle with a rook on e8 (or Black with a rook on e1), provided that rook had never moved (which could only happen if it was a promoted pawn)...


11

There is no real definite answer for this question. Many people have floated different theories, most of which borrow bits and pieces from each other. It is quite possible that his mental struggles just got the best of him or that he lost interest after attaining the summit of the game. Psychologically, it must have been hard to cope when you get the ...


11

At the very least we know that in 1992 a man that looked and sounded like an aged version of Bobby Fischer played Boris Spassky in a match, and won it. Assuming that this old man was actually not Fischer, we must think of plausible alternatives for who it possibly could've been. What old man besides Bobby Fischer will look like Bobby Fischer and be able to ...


11

If it was only about the 1975 match, It could have been a mistake by the video editor. As far as many sources from the web, there were only 3. Not counting the draws, first to win 10 games wins the Championship. If the result is 9-9, then the title goes to Fischer but the prize money is split equally. There will be an unlimited number of games. The first ...


10

Not Fischer. But there is the infamous Tim Krabbe vertical castling problem: http://www.futilitycloset.com/2009/12/11/outside-the-box/ Although it appears this was already illegal as of the problem's publication in 1972.


9

Yes. The game itself was majestic, by far the best to date. Harry Golombek described it as "a masterpiece through and through." Fischer was able to create and then remorselessly exploit vulnerable spots in Spassky's barricade, prizing his defenses apart before battering him with the rooks and queen, and without once leaving his own position at ...


9

I would not normally answer this question since the other answer points out the basis for the first move of the variation, but only the first move. It left out why white is so lost in that variation, and why Byrne did not play it. At the end of both lines below, there are written notes explaining the resulting position. [Event "New York Rosenwald-03"] [...


8

I am a chess player and one of the many premier ones in my state. Clearly, I don't agree with the stated fact. There are a lot many chess players and that too people with gigantic chess conceptions who lead a normal (maybe slightly happier and proud than people not acquainted with the game) life. Any doubts check out on chess giants like Magnus Carlsen, ...


8

Great talent and great psychological instability go well along in an altogether very unbalanced life. I don't think the game in itself causes that, nor that being crazy¹ helps to play, only that concentrating the focus of a lifetime to a single thing can very wall harm one's sanity, especially as powerful minds are dedicated to it. Cantor comes to mind, ...


8

Botvinnik believed in peer review. He would write up annotations for his games, and publish them hoping for feedback from other players. He also recommended to his students that they annotate their losses, and also look for mistakes in the games they won. These elements are all part of his 'scientific' approach. Fischer always kept the endgame in mind, ...


8

I do not agree with you describing Fischer as crazy, I'll do my best to explain it. Someone is called crazy, when he can no longer control his thoughts or actions. Simply because Fischer attacked the Americans politics doesn't mean he's crazy, maybe he has different political opinion than yours and you just have to accept it. Well if anyone who doesn't like ...


8

Summary: Cesar Munoz from Ecuador is the last untitled player to beat Fischer, in 1961. Kovacevic is the last non-grandmaster to do that in 1970, but obviously he was already very strong. Janosevic in 1967 was a grandmaster but not the most famous of them. And Spassky in 1992 was not that strong anymore... Detailed answer: From 1960 onwards, Bobby ...


8

What you are describing is basically the difference between an opening and a system. A system is an opening plan that works similarly against most of your opponent's replies. Famous systems are the London system, the Colle system and the King Indian Attack. As you say, systems give the advantage that you don't need to memorize tons of variations, you just ...


8

Several methods to do so are described on Wikipedia. For example: Roll all the dice in one throw and place White's pieces as follows: Place a bishop on one of the eight squares (counting from the left, 'a' through 'h' ) as indicated by the octahedron (d8). Place the other bishop on one of the four squares of opposite color as indicated by the tetrahedron (...


7

Spassky had an entire squad of Soviet grandmasters trying to find holes in Fischer's repertoire. So it made a lot of sense to surprise them. He also avoided the sharp King's Indian and went for the Nimzo instead. There are other examples for this strategy. Peter Leko, a 1.e4 player, switched to 1.d4 for his match against Kramnik. Changing the black ...


7

He had mental problems. But he is still one of the greatest chess players of all time. Joseph Ponterotto has even written a book about Fischer's mental problems - A Psychobiography of Bobby Fischer Ponterotto believes the evidence is strongest for paranoid personality disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by unrelenting paranoia and ...


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