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25

Brilliant little data mining project! I used the wiki list of GMs and wrote a quick and dirty script to extract the data. Feel free to use and expand/alter it, if you are interested. As it turns out, the average age for reaching GM is just above 28. It is, however, skewed by "old" generation players and players from time before GM title was a thing. It was ...


17

There are actually three different distinctions in the USCF system that have to do with a 2200 rating. First is the National Master title. It is awarded to anyone who has ever had an established (not provisional) rating of over 2200. Once a player is a National Master, they have the title for life no matter what happens to their rating. The NM title has no ...


14

Dana Reizniece-Ozola holds the title of Woman Grandmaster (2001) and is a politician who served as Minister of Economics (2014–2016) and Minister of Finance (2016–2019) of the Republic of Latvia. In the Olympiad of 2016, she beat Hou Yifan. Perhaps not a minister, but in chess he reached the absolute top: former World Champion Anatoly Karpov. He's member of ...


8

According to this Wikipedia entry, the lowest FIDE title is Candidate Master (CM), which requires an ELO rating of at least 2200. Obviously national chess federations offer their own titles, often with lower requirements.


8

The USCF has two independent systems for naming players' levels: 1) Rating-based: Senior Master (2400+), National Master (2200-2399), Expert (2000-2199), Class A (1800-1999), Class B (1600-1799), etc. This describes your current rating; you can be Class A today and Class B next week. The one exception is that once your rating gets to 2200, you are a master ...


7

Rating is a lagging indicator. That is, it gives an estimate of playing strength in the past. Therefore by definition players who are improving are underrated and players who are declining in strength are overrated. Therefore as a first step if you can enter late you should look at the age profile of the entries and avoid entering tournaments with lots of ...


7

The oldest player for whom I can find supporting evidence is Nikolai Shalnev who was 57 when he got his third GM norm in the Spring 2001 tournament in Odessa at which point his FIDE rating was 2550. According to his (German) Wikipedia entry: Shalnev trägt seit 2001 den Großmeister-Titel. Die dritte Norm für den Titel des Großmeisters hat er beim ...


7

Yes, we include all the players who participated in the event. If you finish second after WGM Ryjanova, you will receive a norm but not the title. If you finish fourth, you receive neither, regardless of who is on the podium. If the level of the field is high with a lot of tilted players participating, it often occurs that no 'special' title is awarded at ...


6

There are, of course, some players who have been given the title in perfectly "respectable" circumstances like reaching a certain rating or reaching 50% in an Olympiad. However, try this. Go to the FIDE rating website and do an advanced search for titled players sorted by rating ascending. The first 7 players in the list are WCM with ratings between 1032 ...


6

Yes. According to the ECF website it costs £10 and a number of different titles are available for ECF members: (a) Chess Maestro A player must achieve a grade of at least 95 on any ECF official grading list. (b) Team Master A player must achieve a grade of at least 120 on any ECF official grading list. (c) Club Master A player must achieve a ...


5

In general, countries with many tournaments but not a super strong "chess culture". I think China and Iran tend to not have so many tournaments (if I recall correctly), which explains why their players tend to be more underrated. Meanwhile, European countries have lots of FIDE rated events (some clubs have such events every weekend!). Since they have more ...


5

Oscar Shapiro was the oldest player to become a master. He did it at the age of 74. Wilhelm Steinitz was the oldest world chess champion. He won the title from Zuckertort in 1886 at the age of 50 and held it until he was defeated by Lasker in 1894 at the age of 58 years and 10 days. Source


5

The answer used to be Yes, via the Permanent Commission for Chess Compositions; in 2010 the Commission became the independent World Federation for Chess Composition, but "both organisations are cooperating". As was the case before 2010, there are three titles: Master, International Master, and Grandmaster, all based on the counts of problems and studies ...


4

Yes, it is possible. FIDE can award the title of honorary grandmaster, based on a player's past performances and/or other contributions to chess. Most of the honorary grandmasters were still alive when they were awarded the title. However, there are two examples where the title was awarded posthumously: GM Rudolf Maric and GM Karoly Honfi.


4

They used to, but now the titling process is handled by the World Federation for Chess Composition. Here's a link to some of the titles: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_grandmasters_for_chess_composition


4

A solution: Move to a country with a low rated national team and join the team in the Olympiad. CM and WCM titles are awarded for 50% performance in at least 7 games in the Chess Olympiad, regardless of the ranking of opponents (Fide Handbook). Because the pairings are made using the Swiss system and your team mates are (hopefully) performing poorly, you ...


4

I've displayed an FM title and never noticed a problem with cheating once. Your question is the first time I've ever thought about the concept of someone wanting to cheat more against a titled player. If anything, most players would want the opportunity to get to play a titled player, and wouldn't waste it by cheating with an engine. How do you know that ...


4

here's a list of some famous chess players who were able gain fame in other areas.Just to mention ,none of them are actors or politicians. Former world Champion Mikhail Botvinnik was a famous computer scientist and electrical engineer. He was one of earliest pioneers of AI. Attacking player Extraordinaire Rashid Nezhmetdinov was also a checkers player,...


3

This seems to be a quiz question, you probably know the answer but anyway ... The first rating list that contains the Candidate Master title is April 2002 and all the players on that list with the said title are from England followed by Wales in the next rating list (July 2002). There are two relatively well known names among the first eleven people in ...


3

I'm not aware of the person you're referring to, but GM Ye Jiangchuan of China started playing at around 17, as far as I remember from what I read about him. That's relatively quite late for Chess GMs. You can find more about him here: Ye Jiangchuan (Wikipedia)


3

To obtain the FIDE title of Candidate Master (CM), it is required to have a FIDE rating of 2200 or more. See the FIDE handbook or Wikipedia. The title is for life. According to Wikipedia, the USCF title of Expert is awarded to players rated from 2000 to 2199 (USCF rating!). The title is not for life. So, the two titles depend on two different ratings. The ...


3

The United States Chess Federation has a title system that goes down into class play. I have the category 1 title, which I gained by getting 5 tournament performances which would be impressive for an 1800 player (norms) and achieving a rating above 1800. The category titles correspond to the classes 1-A, 2-B, 3-C, 4-D Above category 1 are Candidate Master ...


3

The CM title is awarded by "just" having a 2200+ FIDE rating, and after some tournament results. Something similiar happens with Fide Masters (needed rating is 2300+). Such ratings correspond to a strong amateur player, but they're far away from traditional GM and IM titles, which also need three norms before being awarded. You have more info on this topic ...


2

The Grandmaster (or GM) title is awarded to players who fit two criterias : Their ELO rating is above 2500. They have achieved 3 GM norms. A GM norm is achieved when a performance of 2600 is reached at the end of the tournament. Moreover, all tournaments don't qualify for GM norms : there must be at least 3 GMs in attendance with a minimum rating of 2200, ...


2

In the strict realm of FIDE, a 2200 FIDE rated CM is not a master. This is because FIDE's official master title is the FM (2300 FIDE rating). However, in the US and Canada, a 2200 national rating earns the NM (national master) title. So, if a player had a 2200 FIDE rating but a 2100 national rating, in the strict sense they would not be considered a master. ...


2

There are several reasons why someone would use the term 'master', but without a specific reference to work from all I can suggest is that the term is generally synonymous with the phrase 'top player'. The two examples that come to mind are: Historical: Many of the great early players did not have actual titles (either because the titles had not been ...


1

A title sometimes attracts cheating, but those cheating against a titled player (or generally a strong player) are easily identifiable. Usually they are below average players having played a small number of games (to climb to that rating of a titled player) on an account used particularly for cheating. However, I don't see any point of doing this. The more ...


1

Many informative answers have been given, but to answer the real question: The readers are supposed to be beginners or amateurs or even chess enthusiast that do not really play chess. The answers should focus on how the title is perceived by potential buyers of the book, and not on the technical details of obtaining the CM title. I have been playing ...


1

Another way to look at this question is to ask how the players who are eligible for the title rate the title compared to other titles as reflected in the take-up rate. Every month FIDE publish files of rating data for all current FIDE registered players which also includes details of the titles they have. From these files it is possible to extract counts of ...


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