12

22...Rd2 saves the queen, but black is still down a massive amount of material. After white takes the rook on d2, he has two rooks for just a bishop. With such a huge material deficit, there is no possible hope of defending with normal play. The only chance for black would be to have an immediate attack on the king or other very strong compensation, which is ...


11

I think the main reason behind Bd3 is to provide a "safe" retreat for the knight and keeps to e-file open. Both Nf3 and Nh3 have liabilities. A retreat to e4 also allow a further lose of time from f5, but this may be offset by black's LSB having less mobility. The other option is Bf1, which while playable, also goes against basic opening principles. ...


10

Comparing 6.Bb3 and 6.Bc4, the drawbacks of the latter are obvious since the bishop is not protected and can become a target to attacks: either by a black piece: Ne5, Na5, Qc5, Qd4... or, more probably, by the d-pawn: the typical ...d5 will gain a tempo for development On the other hand, I can see no advantage of having the bishop on c4 rather than b3. ...


8

4.Ng5 is a provocative move, threatening to take on f7. The main line is 4...d5, and after 5.exd5 the best move might be 5...Na5. After 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 Black has sacrificed a pawn but has gained a slight lead in development. If instead you play 5...Nxd5, White will often play 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6, known as the Fried Liver. White has a very good ...


8

After White's 22. Bc1, it seems like responding with Rd2 would keep the game alive for Black. This is an entirely wrong assumption. Black has no counterplay whatsoever, while White holds the initiative. Being down material, Black has no resources/time to repel the coming attack, nor to organize a defense/counterplay. Because his queen is trapped he will be ...


6

FM Andrey Terekhov's Two Knights Defense repertoire on Chessable uses this variation against 4.d3. That repertoire deserves to be more widely known: it's one of the best on Chessable, the author updates it frequently, and it's free! In the introductory text of 4.d3 h6 he notes: In the beginning, this line has been mostly used as a surprise weapon, but in ...


6

Typically by sharp you mean highly tactical lines, with few alternative moves, where any wrong move leads to immediate defeat. A sharp and sound opening would be one that is so far analyzed that you can claim to lead to more or less equal position. Many sharp openings tend to be drawish if players know what they are doing. Reasons for that: because moves ...


6

"That is, from an experienced player's viewpoint, why do we assume that staying alive with Rd2 is not worth the effort, and how would White be sure to win regardless?" I don't want to speak for you but it seems you're getting more at a philosophical question about whether or not to resign than asking about the position. For an under 1200 section, this ...


5

As someone who plays 4.Ng5 as White, I can tell you what I've found to be the hardest Black line against me: 4...d5 5.exd5 Na5 6.Bb5+ c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 8.Be2 h6 9.Nf3 e4 10.Ne5 Bc5!? [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Be2 (8. Qf3 Be7 9. Bxc6+ Nxc6 10. Qxc6+ Bd7 11. Qf3 O-O) h6 9. Nf3 e4 10. Ne5 Bc5!? (10......


5

Traxler is too rarely played to anybody care. Bd5 and Bb3 are old main lines. Bc4 is actually Lc0 main line on pretty solid depth. One obvious advantage is easier handling of future pin while I don't think the bishop is so exposed there. From b3 it could actually be easier for black to hunt it with Na5. So it's great move in position you will probably not ...


4

A first example of a line that is sharp and drawish is the following variation of the Pirc with f4. [fen "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1.e4 d6 2.d4 Nf6 3.Nc3 g6 4.f4 Bg7 5.Nf3 c5 6.Bb5+ Bd7 7.e5 Ng4 8.e6 Here are the statistics. However, the very high percentage of draws is also explained by the fact that some titled ...


4

The video's author might be overstating it by calling it a "disaster" as there is no clear knockout blow. Nevertheless, white is clearly better, and the attack will continue with best play, but it requires accuracy or the extra piece may tell the final tale. White will remain down a piece for two pawns, and will probably win a third in the near future due ...


4

The gambit doesn't lose but it also doesn't gain much advantage. Black can play Nc6 and transpose into the two knight defense which is seen in the Italian and the scotch gambit. These lines have a lot of theory and grandmasters are comfortable that they can draw them. Thus, white struggles to find an advantage using this opening at the top level.


4

I played the Traxler a lot, and it's quite a good option to play after preparation. Your opponents will escape with castling most of the time because they will be scared of your opening prep. And when they accept the sacrifice, there are quite easy draws for Black, if you don't want to play to win. If you feel confident in complex tactical positions, the ...


3

When I looked for a similar book, the best I could find is this somewhat dated work by Jan Pinski. This newer book by Glenn Flear apparently contains 88 pages about the italian, Evan's gambit and two knights. If you have played the Bishop's opening before maybe this is the book for you: It advocates going into the Italian game by 2.Bc4.


3

The move you gave looks fine. In my correspondence database I have 9 games in the position after 11...Bd6. Eight went for 12.Bxb5+, but one game (featuring a 2397 player from 2010) chose 12.Qe2. Even though the game is old, it gives some backing to 12.Qe2 because of the player's strength. Meanwhile, the strongest evidence in correspondence for 12.Bxb5+ comes ...


3

The point is that after 8...h6, White can now play 9.Ne4. Comparatively, after 8.Be2 h6, White must go for 9.Nf3 e4, when the knight is hit again. You're right that 8.Bd3 blocks the d2-pawn from advancing, but this isn't such a huge price to pay. The c1-bishop can get into the game via b3 followed by Bb2.


3

I think this move illustrates the problem with "opening principles". Sometimes they simply contradict one another! For example, 8.Be2 may appear more natural because it does not block the "d" pawn. However, it also places the bishop in a passive square as, as indicated by Mike Jones, does not allow for Ne4 later on. Finally, Qf3-related ideas may still be ...


2

I think the name for 4. Ng5 is Knight Attack. There isn't a specific name, because it leads to more specific openings, like the Fried Liver Attack, Polerio Defense 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 (trying to prevent the sacrifice), the Traxler Countergambit 4. Ng5 Bc5, and more. It's just like how 1. e4 e5 is called the open game. There isn't a specific name for it, ...


2

I don't know there's a book that covers all of those openings well. The Pinski book tries to but I don't think they do a good job. My favorite book on the Evans is Harding's book. The two knights can go in a lot of different directions so you might look into how you want to play it first. The Giuoco Piano and modern bishop's opening may look similar but are ...


2

There is a very interesting counter to the fried liver attack that i came across. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaoeq9nXIEQ [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 Bc5 5. Nxf7 Bxf2 There are lots of variations covered by matoJelic, please have a look.


2

I recently showed an interesting variation for black to a few friends at a tournament. There were the good old times when me and my chess club buddies spent hours on end analyzing these sorts of positions. Well, it goes like this: [FEN ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Nd4 6.c3 b5 Yes, it looks totally crazy! And it is, too! As far as I ...


2

There's a simple reason for which 3...a6 and 3...Nf6 are by far the most common replies to the Ruy Lopez: they're the most solid for black. It's very hard to force white into playing something dynamic without comprimising your own position. Of course, you can try something like the Schliemann Defence with 3...f5, though objectively this is dubious for black. ...


2

As others have correctly said, once you have played 3..Nf6 there is no going back. A very reasonable alternative is the Hungarian Defence 3..Be7, against which White cannot launch a wild attack. If he plays too quietly (c3, h3..), you can often take the initiative by playing ..d5. Books will you that ..Be7 is a bit passive, but at your present level your ...


1

Responding 3...Nf6 to the Italian Game initiates the Two Knights Defense. This isn't an opening to play if you're looking for a calm positional game with material equality; in fact, it's been suggested that the name "defense" is inappropriate and the opening should've been called a "counterattack" or even "gambit" instead. White playing 4.Ng5 practically ...


1

It suggests that strong players believe it doesn't give White much of a chance for an advantage.


1

Rd2 (giggling) is just a move like a computer which will not lose until it has been programmed to resign. There is nothing Black can do except run like a mouse here & there. White is in an extreme dominating position with his Beautiful Knight on e5 making him supreme in the Game. Question is after sacrificing the rook what black can do? The point of ...


1

I wanted to have this as a surprise weapon with black, but was very disappointed even with immediate d4. Plus after Nxf7 black is on the edge of losing in the Kf1 line as was played in some correspondence games. And it is by far not clear what problems white has in Bxf7+. So for me this looks more like a rapid/blitz attempt. But for players who like mess and ...


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