9

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 d6: 365chess.com database shows: MOVE | games | year | White + Draw + Black -------+-------+------+--------+--------+------- 4. d4 | 491 | 2018 | 50.3 % | 24.4 % | 25.3 % 4. c3 | 359 | 2018 | 53.5 % | 20.6 % | 25.9 % 4. d3 | 357 | 2018 | 45.4 % | 22.7 % | 31.9 % 4. h3 | 323 | 2016 | 42.7 % | 25.7 % | 31.6 % 4. Nc3 | ...


9

The game will get the characteristics of the Philidor Defense rather than the Italian Game. Wikipedia calls it the Semi-Italian Opening. I. A. Horowitz called the defence "solid", also writing: "It does not seem quite sufficient for equality." The Wikipedia article notes several possible continuations for White, with 4. d4 probably the best bet for ...


5

I only see three alternative moves to defend the f2 square: 6.Be3 Bxe3 7.fxe3 results in doubled isolated center pawns, not something I would like to play with. 6.Qd2 and 6.Qe2 block the bishops. I guess it's a matter of what you like to play with. If you block one of your bishops, you can later play the queen again or fianchetto the bishop. 6.Qd2 and then ...


5

5...Bb4+ looks like a weird move because you wouldn't play a move like that often, but it makes perfect sense because the white bishop in on b3. White would definitely want to develop his knight with Nc3 on the next move and put pressure on Black's pawn center. By playing 5...Bb4+ you prevent 6.Nc3 (it'd lose a piece). If White goes for 6.c3, then Black can ...


3

There is no way to "crush" that move. You just play! Develop your pieces, get space in the center and obtain a small advantage. Your opponent won't be losing a piece or something like that. I assume 3...d6 may have some ideas related to a pin on g4 (for instance, 4.d4 Bg4) A c3 pawn advance can be useful to prevent some ...Nd4. I think you'll be fine after ...


2

I think the first step is to look at the analysis of the first 9 to 10 moves; It is all pretty standard for the first few moves. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 O-O Nxe4 6. d4 Be7 Re1 b5 Rxe4 {[#] And now Bb3 would win. C84: Closed Ruy Lopez: Unusual White 6th moves.} d5 Nxe5 Nxe5 Rxe5 {Threatens to win with Bb3. White is better.} bxa4 So looking at the ...


2

After 6.Qf3, black can Not initiate Q trade 6... gxc6 7. Be2 or Nd2. In this case black's N has some develop problem as Q is blocking its natural f6 square. Trade Qs 6... Qxf3 7. gxf3 bxc6 8 Be3. And normally after that 8... Bxe3 fxe3. In this case, white has better central control. White's K normally stays behind and guards the e/f pawns. Black's weak a ...


2

There's a simple reason for which 3...a6 and 3...Nf6 are by far the most common replies to the Ruy Lopez: they're the most solid for black. It's very hard to force white into playing something dynamic without comprimising your own position. Of course, you can try something like the Schliemann Defence with 3...f5, though objectively this is dubious for black. ...


1

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 Nxd4, both 4.Nxd4 and 4.Nxe5 seem to lead to an advantage for white. However, it's hard to tell which of the two options is best. Therefore it's a matter of taste. 4.Nxd4 exd4 5.Qxd4 transposes to the Scottish main line, where black played the inferior 4....Nxd4. This option is the easiest for white: white stays in his ...


1

I don't think white minds gxf3. He gets a half-open g file for his rook and he is capturing towards the center. I suppose black will respond with bxc6 and I would play Nd2 going for Nb3 next move and asking black where his bishop will go. If it goes back to b6 then pawn a4 seems like a very nice position for white, while other moves he will play f4 anyways ...


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