10

Comparing 6.Bb3 and 6.Bc4, the drawbacks of the latter are obvious since the bishop is not protected and can become a target to attacks: either by a black piece: Ne5, Na5, Qc5, Qd4... or, more probably, by the d-pawn: the typical ...d5 will gain a tempo for development On the other hand, I can see no advantage of having the bishop on c4 rather than b3. ...


5

Traxler is too rarely played to anybody care. Bd5 and Bb3 are old main lines. Bc4 is actually Lc0 main line on pretty solid depth. One obvious advantage is easier handling of future pin while I don't think the bishop is so exposed there. From b3 it could actually be easier for black to hunt it with Na5. So it's great move in position you will probably not ...


3

In response to: 4.c3. This outright loses a pawn to 4...Nxe4. I have a hard time believing White will play this often. 4.Nc3. This move is tame, effectively accepting a symmetrical position with minimal advantage if Black plays 4...Bc5. Black does not have to acquiesce and could play 4...Nxe4 5. Nxe4 d5 giving Black easy development and a comfortable game. ...


3

The Traxler counter-attack starts if White plays Ng5 in this position. [FEN "r1bqkb1r/pppp1ppp/2n2n2/4p3/2B1P3/5N2/PPPP1PPP/RNBQK2R w KQkq - 4 4"] 1. Ng5 Without Ng5, there is no Traxler counter-attack. I think that 1.e4 e5 is not the best way of preparing an attacking and aggressive battle with Black. That is why I play 1.e4 c5 and go for the ...


3

Bxf7+ is definitely the way to go in practice in my opinion. I have done quite a lot of analysis with stockfish on Nxf7 and am not at all sure it is better for white despite the computer evaluation early on. Bxf7+ almost certainly is a lot better for white and is a lot simpler to learn which is important for a repertoire choice against an unusual line (most ...


2

In Karpov-Beliavsky, Moscow, 1983, Black held a draw without ever being in serious trouble. Karpov played 5.Bxf7. I have never seen detailed analysis of the game. If it suits your style, try it. But there is a HUGE volume of analysis on it. If you play it more than once you may face a booked-up opponent.


2

I can't find it now, but I remember reading this exchange on Chessbase. A player just played ...e6 on one move, and then ...e5 on the next, seemingly losing a tempo for no reason. It was clearly computer preparation however. An interviewer asked GM Viswanathan Anand what he thought about the moves. Anand replied that if the computer thinks it's fine, then it'...


1

As previously suggested by Hamish, Bxf7 instead of Nxf7 is a safe way for white to gain an edge, though Nxf7 is unsound anyways. In my opinion, if you want a swashbuckling defense against the fried liver, e4 e5 Nf3 Nc6 Bc4 Nf6 Ng5 Nxe4!? This move is much less known than traxler counter gambit and full of tricks. For example, if Nxf7, black is equal,...


1

I would call it dubious for most rating levels. A computer doesn't like it too much, and you are going to lose a pawn. However, the line requires very accurate play by white to maintain that advantage. You can also get a bit of a psychological advantage here by completely ignoring your opponent's attack and focusing on your own - and if your opponent is ...


1

I wanted to have this as a surprise weapon with black, but was very disappointed even with immediate d4. Plus after Nxf7 black is on the edge of losing in the Kf1 line as was played in some correspondence games. And it is by far not clear what problems white has in Bxf7+. So for me this looks more like a rapid/blitz attempt. But for players who like mess and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible