Wes
  • Member for 7 years, 11 months
  • Last seen more than 1 year ago
Can playing blindfold chess be learned or is it a natural skill?
31 votes

In essence, you are asking- Can memory (or other brain functions) be improved or is it a natural trait? The answer is yes to both. While it is true that one's memory can be improved, it is also ...

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How do you checkmate with a rook?
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29 votes

I know you're a FIDE Master :), so I suppose you're more interested in this question from a teaching perspective. The simplest way to understand a checkmate with King and Rook vs King is the idea of ...

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How do you checkmate with the pair of bishops?
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25 votes

I always like to explain this in a visual way. Basic Idea: Keep the bishops together. They form a large net (restricted area) from which the opponent king cannot escape. Step 1: Push Opponent's ...

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Understanding vs. Memorization
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20 votes

Who better to answer this question than the legendary former World Champion and master of opening preparation Garry Kasparov himself? I quote In June 2005 in New York I gave a special training ...

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What are black's possible plans in the exchange variation of the Queen's Gambit?
17 votes

Question: What are black's possible plans in the exchange variation of the Queen's Gambit? I think the positions could be classified into two main types depending upon where White develops the g1 ...

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Why is the centre of the board considered important in chess?
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16 votes

While (e4, d4, e5, d5) are generally regarded as the central squares, the same principle can sometimes be extended to the adjacent squares like (c4, c5, d3, d6, e3, e6, f4, f5). So we have a kind of ...

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Chess traps without positional loss
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15 votes

The following traps do not lead to any positional loss for the side setting the trap. It's obviously not an exhaustive list- A common trap in the Sicilian [FEN ""] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. c3 Nf6 ...

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Does depth (number of ply) still matter once it is high enough?
15 votes

Yes, those 15 depths very much matter. Consider this position that occurred in Kasparov's Immortal Game vs Topalov. [White "Kasparov"] [Black "Topalov"] [FEN "b2r3r/k4p1p/p2q1np1/NppP4/3R1Q2/...

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What to do after losing a game?
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14 votes

The best practice would be to thoroughly analyze the game and also your thought process before, during and after the game. Besides, if after sincere hard efforts you still lose, it's important to have ...

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Is there a name for this attack against Sicilian defense?
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13 votes

6. Be3 against the Najdorf Sicilian is called the English Attack. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 6. Be3 ...

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Which notable players in chess history successfully used dubious openings?
12 votes

Among World Champions, Alekhine was a top bluffmaster. Capablanca once remarked that "Alekhine's game is 20% bluff". Here's one example of his bluffs. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/...

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I need to get rid of Black's light-square Bishop
12 votes

John : I need a new car. Joe : Ok, let's buy one! Mark : Wait. Why do you need a new car? John : Because the battery in my car is really bad and my car doesn't start quickly. ...

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Queen's Indian Defense question that has me stumped
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11 votes

The simple reason is because 3...b6 doesn't prevent 4.e4! when White immediately grabs the center. [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 b6 4.e4! The bishop on b7 isn't very effective in the ...

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Are there moves in chess that are considered unsporting?
11 votes

I do think that the intention (and thus behavior) behind a move is what could make a move unsporting. Even in the example of football (soccer), the intention behind passing the ball to the defender ...

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A problem rebus-reproduce the game
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10 votes

Highly non-optimal, but here's one line that reproduces the position. The basic idea is to not capture the existing pieces, but capture pawns. A single pawn capture can free 3 pawns to promote. Here's ...

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Online Sites For Earning Money Through Chess
10 votes

As others have mentioned, there is no genuine site to make real money because it's so easy to cheat online by using chess engines. The closest thing to "money" would be "ducats" as allowed on the ...

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Kramnik - Karjakin in the FIDE Candidates 2014, was 8...f5 correct?
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10 votes

8...f5 is no novelty. It is a well known line and has been played successfully before by strong players like Adams, Salov and Karjakin himself. 8...f5 is absolutely the correct move in the position, ...

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How do you hold a draw with a knight against a rook?
10 votes

In analyzing and studying this endgame, I believe I have found a very simple way to explain the defensive technique (for this example, we will consider the defender to be Black). Once I learned this ...

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Problem: Find White's second-to-last move
8 votes

White's second to last move must be f5+. So, this is what the position looked like before White's second to last move - [FEN "b7/6pP/7k/7P/4PP2/2PP4/3B2KR/2Q1N2R w - - 0 1"] 1. f5+ g5 2. ...

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Carlsen-Anand, Game 2. Could Black hold if not for 34...h5?
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8 votes

In my analysis, I found Black's kingside position to be more solid than it seems at first glance. After Kh8 and Rg8, Black defends g7 very well. Black should play 34...Qd2, after which his Black's ...

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Am I allowed to do a checkmate and win the game in this situation?
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8 votes

No, it is not checkmate, because your opponent can capture your queen with either the knight on c6 or the king on e8. Checkmate occurs when you give a check to your opponent and your opponent cannot ...

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Checkmate with two knights?
8 votes

Is it really possible to checkmate with two knights and king against a king? It is possible, but it is not forced unless the position or a mistake from the opponent allows it. There is a mating ...

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King's Gambit, Fischer's Defence 6. Ng1. Wait, what?
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8 votes

Your objective assessment of White's position after 6. Ng1 is quite on the mark. A. Objectively speaking... It's hard to see how this position could be good for White. On the plus side - White ...

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How to break through their "Great Wall of China"
8 votes

White cannot break this Great Wall of China in this position. In fact, White is slightly worse and here's why - 1. Pawn chain Black's pawn structure is better than White's. The pawn on e6 is the ...

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What should you do after blundering during a game?
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8 votes

After a blunder, it helps to look objectively at the position once again and forget the history. You might have been better or worse; but that doesn't matter now after the blunder. What matters is how ...

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Looking for way to “punish” the d5 push after 1. d4 Nf6
7 votes

The most direct way to punish this move seems to be to attack the d-pawn immediately. Black gets a very slight advantage. For example [FEN ""] 1. d4 Nf6 2. d5 c6! 3. c4 cxd5 4. cxd5 Qa5 + 5. Nc3 b5!...

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Another chess problem
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7 votes

To be fair, I tried solving this manually. Qb1 works. Basic idea - We see that the Black king cannot move. All that is needed is to give it a check. But where to give it a check from? The Black ...

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How to respond to the Taimanov attack in the Benoni?
7 votes

8...Nfd7 is the most popular line among Grandmasters. Bareev vs Topalov 2002, 0-1 Bostari vs Polgar 2011 0-1 8...Nbd7 is extremely risky and requires thorough preparation. White does seem to get ...

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He has two queens. I have one. Is it proper chess etiquette to check him non stop just to avoid losing?
7 votes

Yes, it is proper chess etiquette. You are not obliged to resign if you have an inferior position. If you can force a 3-move repetition draw by non-stop checks (called "perpetual checks") you ...

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Sherlock Holmes vs Professor James Moriarty, A Game of Shadow-Chess Game Position Reconstruction
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7 votes

Here is my current solution. For convenience and resemblance to the Larsen-Petrosian game, I have assumed Sherlock Holmes is White. [FEN "1q3rk1/2p1p1b1/r1Ppn1p1/3R4/6B1/4BR2/PPn3PK/8 w - - 0 3"]...

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