Especially Lime
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Semi-Slav name origin
Accepted answer
16 votes

It simply because With Black advancing pawns to both e6 and c6, the opening resembles a mixture of the Orthodox Queen's Gambit Declined (QGD) and the Slav Defense. (from wikipedia) If you consider ...

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What move requires the greatest number of moves before it could be played in a game?
15 votes

Evargalo's Ra1-h1 for 15 plies is not correct, since this can be done in 13: [FEN ""] 1. e3 h5 2. Qxh5 Rxh5 3. Bc4 Rxh2 4. Nf3 Rxh1+ 5. Ke2 Rxc1 6. Nc3 Rxc2 7. Rh1 However, it cannot be ...

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Why should I expect that black moves Rxd2 after I move Bxe3 in this puzzle?
Accepted answer
6 votes

The point here is that none of Black's possible responses to 1. Bxd6 prevent 2. Qxf7#. Blocking with the rook or queen leaves it pinned, and blocking with the knight or bishop or capturing with the ...

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Why are chess.com opening names and notations seemingly mismatched?
Accepted answer
6 votes

I think this is intentional. The opening name alludes to the position reached, not the route taken to get there. The principal move order to reach this position is to start with the classical ...

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Both grandmaster and PhD/doctorate
4 votes

One more: Jonathan Mestel has a PhD in applied mathematics (full details in first paragraph of the article) and works as a university professor.

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Notation for ambiguous moves with three pieces or more
Accepted answer
4 votes

Yes. You should disambiguate by adding either the file of departure (if they differ); or the rank of departure (if the files are the same but the ranks differ); or both the file and rank of departure ...

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From the start of the game what is the longest possible series of consecutive white moves where white can do those moves no matter what black does?
4 votes

The accepted answer gives the correct number, but is incomplete. It's true that Black can always force either 3. ... Q(x)d2+ or 3. ... Q(x)f2+. However, what if White could choose a fourth move that ...

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Aggressive response to 1.d4?
4 votes

I have no experience of playing it, but the Albin countergambit 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 might be an option. It's relatively rare but doesn't seem to score too badly compared to the QGD/Slav, with ...

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Straightforward refutation of the Stafford gambit
3 votes

This youtube video on the Stafford gambit discusses possibilities after 5. e5 in some detail, and suggests your 5... Ne4 line, continuing with 7... f6. Your suggestion of 8. Nd2 certainly looks better ...

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Is it possible to be in check by three pieces?
3 votes

En passant also doesn't work. You can, potentially, discover two checks, one because the capturing pawn moves off a file and one because the removed pawn unblocks a diagonal. However, you can't ...

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Is this an Anderssen's mate or Opera mate?
2 votes

Looking at the descriptions of patterns from wikipedia, this exactly fits "Mayet's mate". The section on Andersen's mate suggests opinion is divided as to whether Mayet's is a form of Andersen's or a ...

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Why is it a mistake to trap this bishop?
1 votes

In addition to the reasons why you are not doing great after g5, it seems to me that there is no urgency to trap the bishop immediately. If you start with Bg4, how can white keep their bishop safe ...

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Why 2.d5 is much less common than other responses to the Mikenas Defense(1.d4 Nc6)?
0 votes

Your statistics don't seem likely to be accurate. From 365chess.com, the most common responses are: times win draw loss eval 2. Nf3 1,455 42.9 29.2 27.9 +0.42 2. c4 566 ...

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