ETD
  • Member for 9 years, 8 months
  • Last seen this week
  • Pittsburgh, PA
In how many cases of K, P vs. K, N, N endings can the stronger side force checkmate?
Accepted answer
12 votes

Let's assume that white is the side with the two knights, and black has the single pawn. The endgame study composer A. A. Troitzky gave an analysis (in a lengthy supplement to his 1937 Collection of ...

View answer
What motivated Kasparov's comments on the Anand-Gelfand match?
Accepted answer
12 votes

Kasparov's reason for that statement may be no deeper than this: The current rating list does give a concrete, factual basis for his assessment, though it is certainly something with which others ...

View answer
Does Boris Gelfand share his surname with a chess piece?
Accepted answer
12 votes

Well, just when I was writing the question up, I finally found the answer -- no -- so I am answering my own question. Way down at the bottom of this web page, it gives the Yiddish name for the bishop (...

View answer
Drawn R+2P vs R endgame
Accepted answer
11 votes

I don't know the game you have in mind, but the following is one example of such a drawn position in this ending (as can be verified with a tablebase query): [fen "8/8/1r4kP/6P1/2R2K2/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"...

View answer
Professional match where neither player castles?
Accepted answer
11 votes

It won't be terribly common, but it's not unheard of either. Here are a few examples involving well-known grandmasters: Ivanchuk-Csom (1989): [fen ""] [Event "Yerevan"] [Site "Yerevan"] [Date "1989.?...

View answer
Is the 50-move rule ever used in grandmaster games?
Accepted answer
11 votes

Yes, sometimes the 50-move rule comes up in grandmaster play. One recent example that comes to mind was the game Ushenina-Girya (Geneva 2013), in which the reigning women's world champion failed to ...

View answer
What "double moves" are sometimes considered legal?
Accepted answer
11 votes

From your description, I'm not sure whether in your childhood games the sort of double move you showed above could only happen at that one point in the game, or could continue to happen. So I don't ...

View answer
A conditional retrograde analysis problem
11 votes

The solution is as follows:

View answer
I'm confused about the 50-move rule
11 votes

From the FIDE rules (emphasis added): 9.3 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by the player having the move, if: a. he writes his move on his scoresheet and declares to the arbiter his intention ...

View answer
Move first, record later; or vice-versa?
Accepted answer
11 votes

It hasn't always been so, but these days (at least according to FIDE rules) it's illegal to write your move down before making it, outside of some situations in which a draw is being claimed or the ...

View answer
Can I win this Rook and Pawn vs Bishop endgame?
11 votes

This position is in fact drawn (which you can confirm e.g. by looking the position up in an online endgame tablebase). The key for Black's defense is to maintain the bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal, ...

View answer
Is use of the gambit the main way for black to win?
Accepted answer
11 votes

You ask whether gambit play is the main way for black to play for a win, but instead of gambit play specifically, the issue is more generally one of unbalancing the position (and this is true ...

View answer
Why did Viktor Korchnoi leave the USSR?
Accepted answer
11 votes

The short story is that the Soviet chess authorities at the time were blocking Korchnoi's progress and severely limiting his opportunities to play, as Karpov had been selected as their favorite son. ...

View answer
About forcing a checkmate
Accepted answer
10 votes

White to play and mate in 4, while forcing the black king to capture on each move: [fen "1r2qrnk/3R1bRp/pp2nBpp/p3P3/4B3/5PPQ/PPP3N1/1K6 w - - 0 1"] Solution:

View answer
Gambit openings for black recommendation?
Accepted answer
10 votes

Two gambits that your opponents would likely play into a fair amount, and are defined by move two, are the Latvian Gambit (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5, like a reversed King's Gambit) and the Albin Counter-gambit ...

View answer
As a Beginner, is playing a lot of tactics chess (puzzles) a good way to improve?
10 votes

Is [solving chess puzzles] a good way to learn chess or should I play more normal games? This gets the classic answer for an either/or choice that needn't be exclusive: yes. In other words, do both, ...

View answer
World Computer Chess Championship: Why don't they run all computers on the same hardware?
Accepted answer
10 votes

I think an historical look at that competition helps make the fact that each engine played on its own distinct hardware setup seem more reasonable. Don't think of it as merely an engine (software) ...

View answer
How many such positions are there? (chess/math checkmate puzzle)
Accepted answer
10 votes

Your second basic position allows for 4 more variants beyond those you already gave, indicated by the following diagram: [FEN "1q6/1q6/1q6/1q6/Q7/K7/8/1k6 w - - 0 1"] That brings the tally for "...

View answer
Castling long in the King's Indian Defence (for white)
Accepted answer
10 votes

The most common way to end up with queenside castling for white in the KID is via the Saemisch Variation 5.f3. Black often attacks on the kingside in the KID, and the Saemisch is typically a way to ...

View answer
Can a set of moves be a transposition and a variation?
10 votes

While I don't disagree with the spirit of Wes' answer, I want to answer your question in a somewhat stronger way, one that I think goes further toward relieving any possible confusion about this issue....

View answer
Does it ever make sense to stall for time?
Accepted answer
10 votes

In the bughouse variant a situation can definitely arise in which it makes sense to stall for time. If I'm facing checkmate next move on my board no matter what I do, then if my partner's opponent has ...

View answer
Bird's Opening and the Dutch Defense
9 votes

Looking at some results drawn from 2,000,000+ games, we have these winning percentages for the two openings: White Draw Black ----- ---- ----- Bird's 34 25 41 Dutch 42 30 ...

View answer
Problem: reconstruct the game
Accepted answer
9 votes

Dag Oskar Madsen's (quite generous) hint: The last move was king takes e-eight. And here's the full solution: Pawn to e-four, pawn to e-six, bishop to b-five, king to e-seven, bishop takes d-...

View answer
More Optimal Computer-Found Moves
9 votes

This might not be quite what you're after, but computer-generated endgame tablebases have revealed new knowledge that includes overturning previously held beliefs about the evaluation of certain ...

View answer
What are some chess games that feature Zugzwang despite many pieces remaining on the board?
9 votes

And here's more. An article by Larry Kaufman points to yet another nice example from Fischer, this one played against Daniel Collins in a simul in 1964: [FEN ""] [White "Bobby Fischer"] [Black "...

View answer
Theoretical relationship between Caro-Kann exchange and Queen's Gambit exchange
9 votes

Soltis' Pawn Structure Chess is a good book which treats all the common pawn structures that arise from popular openings. Its focus truly is on the pawn structures themselves and typical plans ...

View answer
Why do many team championships have only 4 boards?
Accepted answer
9 votes

To be concrete, I'll focus on the Olympiad; the same ideas apply more generally. So, the more boards we have on each team, the more representative the match will truly be of the respective ...

View answer
What are ways of practicing blindfold chess?
9 votes

One way to do this is to play at FICS. Using the Arena GUI - and probably others too, I'm sure (but this didn't work for me when I tried e.g. BabasChess just now) - you can login to FICS, and then ...

View answer
How can one determine the opening or transposed opening from the existing pawn formation/structure?
Accepted answer
8 votes

In one sense, I would simply say, "Yes, the pawn structure would be the first indicator that one has entered/transposed into a given opening." But since there's no other answer here as of yet, I'm ...

View answer
Why is g4 the best move in this Queens Gambit accepted line?
8 votes

I suppose you have some source that claims 1.g4 is the best move from the diagram position, but which doesn't give any reason for it. I won't try to weigh in on whether it is in fact the best move ...

View answer