Dag Oskar Madsen
  • Member for 8 years, 6 months
  • Last seen this week
Which notable players in chess history successfully used dubious openings?
7 votes

Thomas Wilson Barnes used 1. e4 f6?! to beat Paul Morphy. [FEN ""] [Event "London m1"] [Site "London"] [Date "1858"] [Result "0-1"] [White "Paul Morphy"] [Black "Thomas Wilson ...

View answer
Why would one promote a pawn to a knight?
7 votes

Here is a fun tactic, involving underpromotion, to finish off the game if you are two connected pawns up in a rook endgame. I saw this in an endgame manual a long time ago, but cannot find the source ...

View answer
How should I play against the Philidor defense?
7 votes

To complement Daniel's answer: Black often aims for the solid Hanham setup with Nf6, Nbd7and Be7 without surrendering the center. The problem is to find a suitable move order from the position [...

View answer
Is there any benefit at all to a rooks' pawn opening?
6 votes

GM Hector once opened with 1. h4 and (with a bit of luck) won the game: [FEN ""] [Event "Dinard open"] [Date "1986.??.??"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Jonny Hector"] [Black "Paul Boersma"] 1. h4 Nf6 2. ...

View answer
From which top class game is the endgame motive?
Accepted answer
6 votes

You are probably thinking of the game Karpov - Kasparov form round 9 in their first World Championship Match in 1984-85. This match was later called off after 48 games before a winner was declared. ...

View answer
Developing a New Software Application in Chess
Accepted answer
6 votes

I don't know if it already exists, but a cell phone app to scan diagrams and chess notation from books and then store the information in a database in a re-playable format would be handy.

View answer
What is a "big pawn"?
6 votes

The term big pawn is usually used to mean an ineffective bishop trapped behind its own pawns. An example from the game Charousek-Maroczy, Budapest 1895: [FEN "6rk/1pp3p1/1r3p1p/p3nP1P/P1PpP3/1P1P4/...

View answer
Amazing chess feats while in altered states of consciousness
6 votes

I don't know if this counts, but here is a story (unfortunately only in Norwegian) about the former president of the Norwegian Chess Federation, Jøran Aulin-Jansson, who in his youth played blitz for ...

View answer
Can I buy IBM DeepBlue?
6 votes

I guess you have to ask IBM, but it's probably not for sale. Right now the custom made computer is on display at the Computer History Museum.

View answer
Position with the most (or many) distinct refutations?
6 votes

I make a separate answer for my own constructions. I'm not a problem composer and don't claim any artistic value. In the following position black has 18 legal moves, and white has a unique mating ...

View answer
Position with the most (or many) distinct refutations?
6 votes

EDIT: Here is another mate-in-two problem with five legal black moves leading to five different checkmates. [Event "Apprenti Sorcier, 1992"] [White "ACHBAR Selim"] [Black "mate in two"] ...

View answer
Could Karjakin have grabbed on g5 at move 56 against Anand in the Candidates 2014?
6 votes

The pawn endgame is a draw. Black doesn't play h3 until white plays f4, for instance [White "Karjakin"] [Black "Anand"] [FEN "8/8/8/4p1k1/4P1Pp/5P2/3K4/8 w - - 0 1"] 3.Ke3 Kh6 4. f4 h3! 5. Kf3 exf4 ...

View answer
What is the shortest known GM level OTB game to end with checkmate?
6 votes

Reti-Tartakower, Vienna 1910, must be a good candidate, although Tartakower resigned one move before checkmate. [FEN ""] [Event "Vienna"] [Date "1910"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Richard Reti"] [Black "...

View answer
French :: exchange variation - but not quite
Accepted answer
6 votes

The game has transposed to a standard exchange variation, a variation pretty well explained on Wikipedia. You could try a setup with 4... Bd6, 5... Ne7, with the idea that if white puts his best ...

View answer
Are there known opening gambit lines for black in the French defence?
6 votes

There is also the gambit from the game Capablanca-Alekhine (St Petersburg, 1914), but it's not very good. [fen ""] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 h6 (4...Be7;4...Bb4)5. Bxf6 Qxf6 6. exd5 Bb4 7. ...

View answer
Why buy Houdini?
Accepted answer
6 votes

Some interesting quotes from Maxime Vachiere-Lagrave in New in Chess (2011/5): About Rybka: ... Obviously, each new version improved the engines a little bit, but to my mind the general structure ...

View answer
Larsen Ideas in the semi-slav
Accepted answer
5 votes

Kasparov in My Great Predecessors, Part 4: Generally speaking, Larsen's contribution to the development of opening theory is not very great, since usually he aimed to lure his opponents into little-...

View answer
Castling during the endgame
5 votes

Here is a famous game between two famous players that ends with “30...0-0.” [Title "Timman-Kasparov, Eurotel Trophy, 1998"] [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.e3 b5 6.a4 b4 7.Nb1 Ba6 8....

View answer
Max Lange Attack - Materials to Study
5 votes

Two other sources: Dangerous Weapons: 1 e4 e5 (2008) by Emms, Flear and Greet has a chapter on the variation with 8. fxg7. Beating the Open Games (2007) by Marin also has a chapter on the Max Lange ...

View answer
Marshall Defense 1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nf6 — transpositions
5 votes

Another possible transposition after 3. Nc3: After 1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 we arrive at a variation of the Chigorin Defense. A particularly tricky line is the following. [FEN ""] [Title "...

View answer
Traps in the Owen's opening
5 votes

Owen's Defense is a bit passive, but quite solid opening, so there aren't that many traps to watch out for. Here is a primitive one: [FEN ""] [Title "Owen's Defense"] [Startply "5"] 1. e4 b6 2. Nf3 ...

View answer
In the endgame KQ vs K, can you premove your way to checkmate?
5 votes

Just to show it's possible, here is a position, without the opponent king trapped at the edge of the board, where you can premove the entire sequence. [FEN "8/6k1/4Q3/8/8/8/8/K7 w - - 0 1"] Move the ...

View answer
What advantage does black gain from this move?
Accepted answer
5 votes

There is no good way to stop Qg7 mate. Black has to give up their queen.

View answer
Creative chess puzzles!
5 votes

Here is a fun puzzle: Construct a legal chess game where white starts with 1. a3, white delivers checkmate on move 5, and the last move is made with the rook that started on a1.

View answer
Is pawn promotion obligatory?
Accepted answer
5 votes

Yes, it is obligatory. From FIDE's Laws of Chess §3.7e (Link): e. When a player, having the move, plays a pawn to the rank furthest from its starting position, he must exchange that pawn as part ...

View answer
Key-Squares in Pawn Endgames
5 votes

If the white king reaches one of the green key squares, then white will win. There is no rule determining those squares, just concrete analysis. However, once we have the key squares in place, we can ...

View answer
When to push centrals pawns?
5 votes

For your general chess education it's important to know the textbook example Tarrasch-Marco, Dresden 1892. [FEN ""] [Date "1892.07.18"] [Result "1-0"] [White "Siegbert Tarrasch"] [Black "Georg Marco"]...

View answer
Could black have taken the queen here?
5 votes

Versions of this question are regularly asked here at chess.SE. Notice that the rules of the game leave no room for ambiguity. Fide Laws of Chess, Article 3.9: The king is said to be 'in check' if ...

View answer
Playing the Queen's Indian. Which kind of players?
Accepted answer
5 votes

Many Nimzo players already have the Queen's Indian Defense on their repertoire to deal with 3. Nf3. Such players may transpose between the two defenses whenever they have the opportunity and feel like ...

View answer
Queen's Gambit Accepted, but Couldn't Capitalize
Accepted answer
5 votes

You can play 5. axb5 and transpose to the answers to this question (Queen's Gambit Accepted with black trying to defend the c file pawn with 4... Bd7).

View answer