Hot answers tagged

7

For shogi and xiangqi, the answer is no. There is no analogue for western Chess960 in those chesses. Disclosure: I'm a decently strong player in all three. The problems Fischer identified in those quotes you gave are that western chess favours the player with more opening preparation, and that there is no room for creativity. (Bear in mind that this is his ...


5

The character 砲 (pào) gives a significant clue: compared to 炮, which is homophonous, the radicals of these characters are different. 砲 uses the 石 radical, which means stone, and 炮 uses the 火 radical, which means fire. Although cannons were not yet invented until, as you say, the 12th century, trebuchets -- weapons of super long range that used stone -- ...


3

Randomizing variants of Xiangqi Xiangqi has numerous variants: here are three which involve randomization. Lucky Xiangqi When I lived in Hong Kong, I saw numerous old guys playing Xiangqi in the villages - while their wives played Mah Jongg back home, I conjectured. About half the time, they would play a randomized version of the game, where all the pieces ...


1

I don't really know either game that well, but I have played both. Xianqqi has lots of weirdly place specific rules. For example, the kings are restricted to a 3x3 square in the middle of the board and aren't allowed to move out of it. This makes it hard to do a chess960 type setup for it. On the other hand, with only 5 pawns for 9 rows, the restriction ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible