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15

As far as I can see there is no fundamental difference between chess and xiangqi that would make xiangqi more difficult for a computer. The state space complexity of chess is somewhat higher, whereas the game tree complexity of xiangqi is higher. Also the branching factor of xiangqi is 38 compared to 35 for chess, not much of a difference. I suspect that ...


12

Douglas Crockford has written an accurate overview of Chinese Chess (or Xiangqi) from the perspective of a chess player. I quote the following: The Board Xiangqi can be played on a 9 by 10 uncheckered board. The board is separated into two territories by a river running horizontally through the center of the board. Bishops are unable to cross the ...


7

For shogi and xiangqi, the answer is no. There is no analogue for western Chess960 in those chesses. Disclosure: I'm a decently strong player in all three. The problems Fischer identified in those quotes you gave are that western chess favours the player with more opening preparation, and that there is no room for creativity. (Bear in mind that this is his ...


6

I learned Shogi from these videos. It goes from absolute beginner to analysis of grand-master games.


5

The character 砲 (pào) gives a significant clue: compared to 炮, which is homophonous, the radicals of these characters are different. 砲 uses the 石 radical, which means stone, and 炮 uses the 火 radical, which means fire. Although cannons were not yet invented until, as you say, the 12th century, trebuchets -- weapons of super long range that used stone -- ...


5

You can try PlayOK, it's free and has quite a lot of players for Xiangqi, and supports westernized pieces (though I'd recommend just learning the chinese characters, it doesn't take long). It also has some players for Shogi (japanese chess), which I personally find to be a much more interesting chess variant, though if you want to play more of that there are ...


5

Xiangqi symbols are now in Unicode 11.0, in the block Chess Symbols: U+1FA00–U+1FA6F.


4

I learned shogi from this book. http://www.amazon.com/Shogi-Beginners-John-Fairbairn/dp/4871872017/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446638715&sr=1-1&keywords=shogi+for+beginners snippet: http://www.bromsgrove-abstract-games.org.uk/shogi.pdf I bought a shogi set from The Shogi Association (A UK group). The fellow running it at the time (...


3

Randomizing variants of Xiangqi Xiangqi has numerous variants: here are three which involve randomization. Lucky Xiangqi When I lived in Hong Kong, I saw numerous old guys playing Xiangqi in the villages - while their wives played Mah Jongg back home, I conjectured. About half the time, they would play a randomized version of the game, where all the pieces ...


2

Chinese chess appears to be more difficult, or at least more subtle, because the powers of the pieces are generally less than in western chess. Only the Chinese chariots are the equivalent of the western rooks. The Chinese horses are almost equal to the western knights, except that they can be "hobbled" in certain instances. The "jumping" properties of ...


2

I played International chess in childhood rather well, now I play only Japanese shogi and Chinese xiangqi. Xiangqi has triple and even quadruple check and many new tactics connected with Cannon. Cannon can make double threat by moving other piece on the board, Cannon makes double pins, can protect or attack pieces like X-ray through two pieces, double checks ...


2

Since XiangQi symbols are Chinese characters and Chinese characters are part of Unicode, you can certainly identify and use these characters to specify XiangQi symbols. For example by copying the characters from the XiangQi wiki page into this translation tool.


2

It could be as simple as the relative popularity of playing blindfolded. In chess playing blindfolded goes very far back. There are reports of islamic scholars playing blindfolded chess of three games simultaneously more than a thousand years ago. In modern times blindfold exhibitions have been a staple of chess events. As records tend to be improved in ...


2

The book I learned from is Chinese Chess: An Introduction to China's Ancient Game of Strategy by H. T. Lau. The book is mostly examples and exercises. There could have been more explanatory text.


2

Xiangqi is less "connected" than western chess. For instance, the five pawns cover only every other file; they're not side by side. There is no "queen" that unifies both lateral and diagonal movement. And the defensive pieces are either limited to the palace (advisors) or to patrolling the surround countryside (elephants); they cannot be used to help attack ...


2

Xiangqi is very tactical, not positional, doesn't have chains or pawns for a long time. The difficulty to computers is the many positions available to the pieces, and the board is 10 x 10. I think makruk or international chess is more more positional than xiangqi and shogi.


2

You can also try www.vietson.com. You can also try www.vietson.com. Variations of Chinese Chess are also available such as Dragon Chess, Shuffle Chess and Blind Chess


2

Xiangqi has more theoretical complexity mainly due to larger board. So if you need to do exhaustive search, it has larger search space. Xiangqi is also more positional. For attacking each side has two rooks, 4 knight-strength pieces, and 5 pawns. So for a crude comparison with western chess, Q+3P are replaced with 4 purely defensive pieces. We know ...


1

I don't really know either game that well, but I have played both. Xianqqi has lots of weirdly place specific rules. For example, the kings are restricted to a 3x3 square in the middle of the board and aren't allowed to move out of it. This makes it hard to do a chess960 type setup for it. On the other hand, with only 5 pawns for 9 rows, the restriction ...


1

While it is possible to write engines that can play different chess-family games, doing so generally yields an engine that are only "competent" at each one, at best. The best engines for each individual game incorporate specific knowledge and optimisations for that game, and are usually incapable of playing the others. Many standard chess engines are not ...


1

I would have to answer no in my opinion. The four forms of chess are different. Shogi from what I remember is a form of chess where capturing an opponent's piece allows you to, at a time of your choosing, put one of that piece on the board as yours. Now that is a level of tactical complexity that surely gives any engine a huge advantage over any strength of ...


1

Try below Ebook, all free for download. http://xiangqielephantgame.blogspot.my/p/download-free-ebook.html?m=1


1

PlayOK and Vietson, both are nothing for Beginners. Vietson is today the Strongest App to play Offline. while Online PlayOK became very popular among skilled Chinese and Vietnamese , so it is too late for western players to join. As level of play is extremely high. Graphics of PlayOK is excellent, except that the grid of lines showing rather rectangles ...


1

Great answers so far. There's a few factors that I want to add as a Westerner who has played occasionally in China. (1) Stalemate doesn't exist. Power to the strong! The resource of pat which makes western endgames interesting right to the end doesn't exist in Chinese Chess. (2) The analogies to western 50 move draw rule are very complicated and ...


1

I played international chess a lot, learning chinese chess now. Here is my impression. Intl chess peices are much more mobile. Queen in intl chess has no matching piece in chinese chess. Rooks are equal. Knight in intl chess is better (at worst - equal) than in chinese chess. King in chinese chess is way less mobile. "Defending pieces" (king, advisors and ...


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