14

The WCC was the "World Chess Council". It was formed in 1998 by Kasparov after the collapse of the PCA (Professional Chess Association) in 1995. It was Kasparov's fourth attempt at an organization separate from FIDE. It organized the candidates match between Kramnik and Shirov in 1998, which Shirov surprisingly won (5.5-3.5), and he was slated to play ...


11

If it was only about the 1975 match, It could have been a mistake by the video editor. As far as many sources from the web, there were only 3. Not counting the draws, first to win 10 games wins the Championship. If the result is 9-9, then the title goes to Fischer but the prize money is split equally. There will be an unlimited number of games. The first ...


8

Short of asking a deceased man, I would say that the answer is "no way". He won the 5th World Correspondence Chess Championship in 1965. Computer chess, if it existed at all, was not strong at all. Even with mainframe-type hardware back then, it paled on comparison to the first Chess Challengers of the early 1980's, and they were only rated about 1200 then. ...


7

Yeah, in fact, the tournament has been put on a pause with the current standings, because they are not able to continue: https://www.chess.com/news/view/2020-fide-candidates-tournament-postponed


7

(this is my opinion, this is a purely opinion-based that some would say should be closed but I prefer to just give my answer) It seems unfair and discriminatory to allow someone into the Candidates just because they are a woman or junior. The recent winners of both championships are also so far off the level of the Candidates that they just wouldn't belong ...


5

I have been playing tournaments for 39 years, 34 as a USCF Master, so I follow chess closely; but other than Fischer, I have never heard of anyone doing it voluntarily DURING their reign. Alekhine is the only other male World Champion not to defend his title, but did it involuntarily (he died). :) Other cases of not defending their title include Hou Yifan, ...


5

Based on a similar list found on anusha.com, which is titled Combined July 1998 FIDE and WCC (PCA) World Chess Rating Lists This table enables comparison between the official FIDE Rating list and the WCC list (formerly known as the PCA list) developed by Ken Thompson. For example, Anatoly Karpov is ranked number 5 and is rated 2725 on the FIDE list but is ...


5

Capablanca's comments about the match can be found in this book.


4

One of Petrosian's greatest strengths was his prophylactic thinking; i.e., identifying threats before they arise and neutralizing them. A book which discusses this concept would be good. For example, "Recognizing Your Opponent's Resources: Developing Preventive Thinking". If you want to learn more about Petrosian himself, part 3 of Kasparov's My Great ...


3

This is not exactly the same thing, but on chess.com, they have allowed the women and the junior speed chess champion to be seeded into the open tournament. Well, the two women, who have played, Hou Yifan, and Elena Danielian have both been crushed by record scores, 27.-2.2 and 27-2 respectively. The other day, Wei Yi got destroyed by Maxime Vachier-Lagrave ...


3

A.N Other is not correct. Regardless of the fact that he still considered himself WC, he did, in fact, resign (renounce) his WC title. From the NY Times in 1974: “I resign my F.I.D.E. [Federation International des Echecs] world championship,” the American grandmaster said in cable received today by the federation, which is meeting concurrently with the ...


3

You have to understand the time. There was a cold war going on and chess was very important to the Soviets who saw chess as proof that their far-left system of government was better. The Soviets would spare no expense to win at chess and used innumerable armies of analysts to analyze every single move Fischer made from the time he was 15. Fischer was smart ...


3

Petrosian's Best Games of Chess 1946-63 by P.H. Clarke, published by Bell & Sons is the obvious place to start.


2

Shektman has a great two-volume set on Petrosian's games, but really, to play like Petrosian you need to get very good at tactics. One of the secrets to his playing style was the way he could sniff out the tactical possibilities inherent in the position and defang them before his opponent could take advantage of them. Daniel Naroditsky wrote a little ...


2

Kasparov's My Great Predecessors series covers all the world champions before him, including the world championship matches they participated in. The one you're interested in is dealt with in volume 1 of the series.


1

What does the chief arbiter do? Here is what the FIDE Competition Rules say about the role of the Chief Arbiter: 3 The Chief Arbiter (CA) 3.1 The duties of the CA are as specified in particular by the Laws of Chess, General Regulations for Competitions, Anti-cheating Guidelines and so on. During the event he also: (1) has to keep the record of each round (...


1

No, this was unequivocally not refuted. First, I would consider a line "refuted" if it led to a significant advantage, and there was nothing you could do about it...it is forced. That is definitely not the case. For a very brief moment in time, this appeared to be slightly better for white, but black has since found plenty of resources with Na5, and it has ...


1

This is a very old question, but the reason is that this is an easy draw at that level, despite the pawn minus for black. The main reason is that black is quite active, and has a monster B on d5. The eventual pa4 move by black will most likely lead to the liquidation of the queen-side, or the Ra1 will need to remain passive to defend a pawn. In addition, ...


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