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55

I feel like you somewhat misunderstand the concept of a time control. The clock is a part of the game. If you are up a piece in a complicated position with five seconds left on the clock that may well be a losing position for you. Sure, the engine may show you +4, but the clock is an important part, especially in blitz. Importantly, if you spent all your ...


45

From my experience (small to medium central European Opens), offering a handshake without words is a commonly accepted form of resignation. The handshake is not part of any official rules. However, there is some reasoning behind it: You shake hands after the game ended (just as you do before it starts). So you only start extending your hand once that end ...


25

Let's look at the title question from the perspective of engine chess, which is more objective in the sense that you can get two engines to play tens of thousands of games against each other at whatever time control you desire. If you look at the latest season of the unofficial world computer chess championship, you'll find that the strongest engine is ...


20

Because not having it would result in some perverse incentives. In particular, in any game where a draw is an acceptable outcome, the optimal strategy without flag drops being losses would be to never make a move and simply wait for the flag. With any partial approach like you propose, the optimal strategy would instead be to try to force such a situation (...


18

Most probably White resigned. This is a common decision to be made in a desperate position such as this one, where there is no doubt Black will be able to win anyway and the 10 or 20 more moves technically needed before checkmate are merely a waste of time. My hypothesis can only be confirmed if you give us some informations about where the found this game ...


14

Look at the diagram. The engine tells you the best move (Rd8). The idea behind that move is that it pins the white knight to the queen and at the same time attacks the knight a second time. Moving the knight white would lose the queen (for a rook). If white tries to defend the knight (with c4, Bc4 or Bf3), black would play c6 attacking the pinned knight ...


13

Since you specifically asked for historical reasons: Think about your two proposed criteria in the context of the year 1800 or 1900. Using engine evaluation is obviously out of the question. So is "asking a better player", because you may often not have one at hand (physically, due to limited means of telecommunication!). Using material count is ...


9

I am sorry to say that the answer is "no", there is no "easy way" to apply pressure and win a pawn in the opening, otherwise, at the top level of chess, the game would be won every time. That is what positional chess is about: You gradually improve your position until the opponent can no longer save all of the material. A theorem of chess is that you must ...


9

The short answer is no. In 25 years of chess experience I have never heard such a term. There isn't unless there is some definition somewhere in a shady club packed with sadists who love to mate with several knights!


9

In a winning position, the best move is the one with the shortest depth to mate. So, the “worst winning move” would be the one with maximal depth to mate. So it seems reasonable to call it the move with maximal depth to mate. However, there are two important caveats: If you repeatedly play these kinds of moves, then your depth to mate may increase, rather ...


9

Except for exceptional circumstances, only three results are considered valid for a chess game (and the corresponding rating change): win, draw or loss. Your suggestion would come with a huge problem: what exactly counts as flagging? How big should your advantage have been for your opponent's victory to not count as a "real" victory? Who should ...


8

I followed the profile of Thunder_Penguin in chess.com and found a blog post about this: some variation. Ady and I made this. Rules: To win, get your king to your two corners (a1 and h1 for White, h8 and a8 for Black) You can't capture pieces* You can't put pieces on the last rank (1st or 8th) You can't castle* You can capture if it's mate in 1 You can't ...


8

In the picture, it could be either the two simply agreeing to the draw, or black resigning, depending on who has the move. Both are typically followed by a handshake. White to move is a draw. [FEN "8/3k4/5p2/3K1P1p/7P/8/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kc5 {The only move} Kc7 {Again the only move.} 2. Kd5 Kd7= {Both sides are forced to repeat here, and it is a draw.} ...


8

It's considered a win because that is what it is by definition from the rules of timed games. When you enter a game you commit to its rules; in this case one of those rules is that the time you have to force mate or other result is constrained by the clock, and you must adapt your strategy to meet that constraint. In the example you have given, you have not ...


7

It's possible to win a pawn in the opening, but because it is the opening (i.e. heavily analyzed), you can't do it by force. You can only do it if the other side lets you. The Two Knight's Defense with 4. Ng5 is effectively a pawn-up opening for White, although it's not obvious. You might want to take a look. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/...


7

If player B is checked in two different ways, then there is by definition no way for player B to block both attackers with a single move. The only way to get out of double check is to move the king. If there's a square for player B's king to move to that is safe, then he can get out of the check. If player B simply doesn't see it, then in a friendly game ...


6

Each tournament has its rules, but what I was taught as a child when I played was that the agreement of the players was the end of the game; if you weren't checkmated, it was treated as though you resigned because you thought the position was a lost position. Shake on it, and the game is decided. As the winning player, it was considered unsportsmanlike to ...


6

I think the only alternative would be in match play or comparing a player's score across multiple games against another player or players. For example, in a 12 game match between two players: (+3 =8 -1) would be worse than (+5 =6 -1) even though the first player won both matches. Scoring by material count or number of moves played would not be beneficial....


6

"Wins by force" means that the move leads to a series of moves that makes it impossible for the losing side to defend the position. Here, the definition of "winning" can vary between annotators. Checkmate is the extreme case of winning. Having an advantage of two pawns without any compensation for the opponent is somewhere at the low end of a winning ...


6

Based on the comments to the question above, there is no offical ruling body governing the rules, therefore, the guy running the tournament is the final authority. It is really up to his judgment. If I were he, and there were time, I would try to see if we could reestablish the position, and finish from there. If not, I would declare a draw. I would not ...


6

Yes, Ne6 staves off mate, but it does not stave off the loss for long, but more importantly, it does not demonstrate the main point of the tactic, which is why they continue with the "worse" gxf6 in the solution. Technically speaking, the computer thinks that after 1.Qxf6, that 1...Qc7 is the "best" move, in which case, black should just resign anyway after ...


5

I occasionally see annotations/commentary where a move / line is said to make (for example) white win "by force". I am unsure if it has the general sense of "this move initiates a forcing sequence where white will come out on top" or something more specific, say, "with this move, white exerts indefensible pressure ('force') on a particular square / ...


5

USCF and FIDE rules state that a draw should be made after the move but before hitting the clock. If those conditions have not been met, then the handshake could considered a resignation offer. https://new.uschess.org/news/just-rules-draw-offer-blues/


4

Sometimes the media would report the number of moves the game lasted as some kind of indication of how badly an opponent was "crushed". If Magnus was to lose in less than 20 moves, that could be considered "badly beaten" by whomever he was playing, and I'm sure anybody reporting on it would mention that fact. To make it more sophisticated, you could count ...


4

Assuming it's black to move this is a very simple win. White has the opposition and a strong king position. I would recommend reading up on the opposition. White can effectively "push" the black king back because black has no alternative. A decent endgame player will see this as a win almost instantly.


4

A possibility that jumps to mind instantly is 26..Qg4, with two threats: Qxg3+ Re2 followed by either Rxf2 or Bxf2+. The only move that prevents both these threats is 27.Kf1, but then black could e.g. play Qh3+ or Rd8. Both moves lead to an easy win. In the position you obtained the most important thing is to make sure white can not solve a threat by ...


3

The 7-piece tablebase says that the position without the pawn on h6 is draw, so I believe this position is also a draw (by perpetual check). A typical winning attempt in queen+pawn vs queen endgames is to find a position where white can block a check with his queen while at the same time giving check. This is not possible here since the black king is ...


3

Black seems to be able to get away with a draw by perpetual check. The usual way for White to escape that, is to advance the pawn, or interpose his/her own queen while giving check (thereby forcing the exchange of queens). The latter is impossible because black's king is well protected. The former is impossible as well, as long as black remembers to give ...


3

Yes, after 2...g6 black is only a bishop behind and not immediately checkmated. But that doesn't matter much for the result -- being a full piece behind is also enough to resign. And, that he stays a piece behind is immediately obvious -- white takes a bishop, black doesn't take back. So that doesn't really need to be explained. On the other hand, what ...


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