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44

From my experience (small to medium central European Opens), offering a handshake without words is a commonly accepted form of resignation. The handshake is not part of any official rules. However, there is some reasoning behind it: You shake hands after the game ended (just as you do before it starts). So you only start extending your hand once that end ...


13

Look at the diagram. The engine tells you the best move (Rd8). The idea behind that move is that it pins the white knight to the queen and at the same time attacks the knight a second time. Moving the knight white would lose the queen (for a rook). If white tries to defend the knight (with c4, Bc4 or Bf3), black would play c6 attacking the pinned knight ...


10

I think that the position is a theoretical draw. While Freeman's answer is quite good, but I think he has overlooked that 1. Qxd2 leads to a clearly drawn position because of Black's amazing response 1 ...Rb3!! [FEN "8/3Q2pk/5p1p/5P2/5K1P/p3r3/b2n2P1/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qxd2 Rb3!! 2. Qxa2 Rb2!! 3. Qxa3 Rxg2 Now I don't see any way for White to win. Black ...


8

I followed the profile of Thunder_Penguin in chess.com and found a blog post about this: some variation. Ady and I made this. Rules: To win, get your king to your two corners (a1 and h1 for White, h8 and a8 for Black) You can't capture pieces* You can't put pieces on the last rank (1st or 8th) You can't castle* You can ...


7

Note: I'm an average player, who learnt chess about 2 years ago, maybe I'm not the right guy to answer such question but I will try. I wanted to ask a similar question, maybe I will today or tomorrow. As for your question. Top level players do make mistakes, maybe they underestimate the opponent, maybe under time pressure, maybe they just don't see the ...


7

Because the queen is protected by the bishop on A3. Therefore its checkmate.


7

It's possible to win a pawn in the opening, but because it is the opening (i.e. heavily analyzed), you can't do it by force. You can only do it if the other side lets you. The Two Knight's Defense with 4. Ng5 is effectively a pawn-up opening for White, although it's not obvious. You might want to take a look. [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/...


6

I think the only alternative would be in match play or comparing a player's score across multiple games against another player or players. For example, in a 12 game match between two players: (+3 =8 -1) would be worse than (+5 =6 -1) even though the first player won both matches. Scoring by material count or number of moves played would not be beneficial....


5

If player B is checked in two different ways, then there is by definition no way for player B to block both attackers with a single move. The only way to get out of double check is to move the king. If there's a square for player B's king to move to that is safe, then he can get out of the check. If player B simply doesn't see it, then in a friendly game ...


5

I occasionally see annotations/commentary where a move / line is said to make (for example) white win "by force". I am unsure if it has the general sense of "this move initiates a forcing sequence where white will come out on top" or something more specific, say, "with this move, white exerts indefensible pressure ('force') on a particular square / ...


5

"Wins by force" means that the move leads to a series of moves that makes it impossible for the losing side to defend the position. Here, the definition of "winning" can vary between annotators. Checkmate is the extreme case of winning. Having an advantage of two pawns without any compensation for the opponent is somewhere at the low end of a winning ...


5

USCF and FIDE rules state that a draw should be made after the move but before hitting the clock. If those conditions have not been met, then the handshake could considered a resignation offer. https://new.uschess.org/news/just-rules-draw-offer-blues/


4

Sometimes the media would report the number of moves the game lasted as some kind of indication of how badly an opponent was "crushed". If Magnus was to lose in less than 20 moves, that could be considered "badly beaten" by whomever he was playing, and I'm sure anybody reporting on it would mention that fact. To make it more sophisticated, you could count ...


4

Almost by definition, the advantage needed to win gets smaller and smaller, the higher level the players get. Between two rank beginners, the loss of a pawn or even a piece means very little, because such players will lose pawns and pieces to each other almost at random. One of them wins after the the other has made several mistakes, and gotten several ...


4

Each tournament has its rules, but what I was taught as a child when I played was that the agreement of the players was the end of the game; if you weren't checkmated, it was treated as though you resigned because you thought the position was a lost position. Shake on it, and the game is decided. As the winning player, it was considered unsportsmanlike to ...


4

The 7-piece tablebase says that the position without the pawn on h6 is draw, so I believe this position is also a draw (by perpetual check). A typical winning attempt in queen+pawn vs queen endgames is to find a position where white can block a check with his queen while at the same time giving check. This is not possible here since the black king is ...


4

Assuming it's black to move this is a very simple win. White has the opposition and a strong king position. I would recommend reading up on the opposition. White can effectively "push" the black king back because black has no alternative. A decent endgame player will see this as a win almost instantly.


3

I guess the question is what to do if one player doesn't find a legal move, but it is not checkmate. In a tournament game he would lose on time, lose because of repeated illegal moves or possibly resign. In a friendly game between amateurs you can handle the situation any way you like. It depends on whether you value the competitive or the social side of ...


3

Congratulations on a fine win. I see you have dominated the center with your knight which is backed up by doubled rooks on an open file. Your king is in a safe position, compared to black's drafty King position. Black's queen is passive though not poorly placed. One of black's rooks is still in the box and is undefended. It's vulnerable. The other rook is ...


3

Black seems to be able to get away with a draw by perpetual check. The usual way for White to escape that, is to advance the pawn, or interpose his/her own queen while giving check (thereby forcing the exchange of queens). The latter is impossible because black's king is well protected. The former is impossible as well, as long as black remembers to give ...


3

If you don't count forfeits (including time forfeits) then yes, the two possibilities for losing a game are resignation or checkmate. There may be other reasons for resignation than material or positional inferiority, however. In 2017, GM Hou Yifan resigned after 5 moves in protest over perceived manipulated pairings. (The pairings were later analyzed ...


3

Simply, at the top-level, a player has enough technique to exploit every little advantage. That's not always true at lower levels. Thus, losing a pawn without compensation may be a little blunder in a match between two beginners, since the opponent could make a bigger blunder on the next moves, and lose the advantage. In a match between 2 pros, a blunder ...


3

The goal of chess players is, ultimately, to create a threat that cannot be stopped. But chess is a famously balanced game. There is no way to create an unstoppable threat unless one of the players errs. In the simple case, one player moves, the other counters, etc. No one makes any headway. At the higher levels, players drop material so rarely that it ...


3

FEN (Forsyth-Edwards Notation) is a way of recording the current position on the chess board - piece positions, active colour, castling possibilities, en passant target, half move clock, full move number. The result of the game is not included.


3

Yes, after 2...g6 black is only a bishop behind and not immediately checkmated. But that doesn't matter much for the result -- being a full piece behind is also enough to resign. And, that he stays a piece behind is immediately obvious -- white takes a bishop, black doesn't take back. So that doesn't really need to be explained. On the other hand, what ...


3

Based on what @Annatar said, it may be interesting to know what was the situation on the board : 1 - Was white obviously winning ? 2 - Was there an obvious draw, such as a pat a few moves down the line ? If 1, Black is either inexperienced or tried something fishy by asking for a draw while losing. So White wins. If 2, then maybe it was reasonable of Black ...


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