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11

The advantage White gets in a game is so small that it becomes completely irrelevant at low levels. What is the point of having such edge on your opponent if you at least are going to make an inaccuracy in the opening or middlegame? Furthermore, in blitz games that small advantage is probably negligible since a greater deal of mistakes are made. My online ...


10

No, it's not racist; it's just a convention. Or like the famous chess saying goes: "White begins, Black wins". There are other board games like Go where Black begins, or games where it depends on which variation you play. The main problem with changing who moves first (or alternating it) is that many diagrams which have been printed (especially in opening ...


7

Is it racist that white moves first? No. According to MoveForEquality.com: The rule was originally developed to make annotation easier, and has never been considered in the context of prejudice. The goal of this movement was never to permanently change the rules of chess. The reversal of the rule for who goes first was simply a way "to inspire a ...


5

How you respond depends on your tastes. If you like tactical play then 3. e4 is the Morris Gambit. This is basically the Albin Counter Gambit with colours reversed and an extra tempo. It can lead to very exciting play. If you are more conservative and prefer a quiet life then 3. e3 is the normal move when play can quickly return to more normal lines.


3

In the Grandmaster Repertoire series, there are three books covering the English opening from white's perspective, written by GM Marin in 2009 and 2010: Volume 1, Volume 2 and Volume 3. More recently, in 2016, IM Cummings wrote a repertoire book based on e3 systems, rather than fianchettoing the bishop with g3. Update: In 2018, a new repertoire series from ...


3

Yes, after 2...g6 black is only a bishop behind and not immediately checkmated. But that doesn't matter much for the result -- being a full piece behind is also enough to resign. And, that he stays a piece behind is immediately obvious -- white takes a bishop, black doesn't take back. So that doesn't really need to be explained. On the other hand, what ...


2

I thought you'd be playing something quiet like the London System. It explains perfectly well why your win rates with Black and White match. Not because the London is not "sound and solid". It is. But too solid. Solid is fine as Black when the main aim is to equalize White's first-move advantage. However, if you are playing White yourself, you can strive ...


2

Maths64's answer is fine. I would like to add: "Don't change your opening repertoire based on some silly irrelevant statistics! Play what feels more comfortable with you" It could be the case that you faced stronger players more often as White. It could also be the case that you made some random mistakes more often as White due to pure chance (or maybe ...


2

For many years the standard work on the English was the four volume series written by John L Watson - "English I: ...P-K4", "English II: ...N-KB3", "English III: ...P-QB4", "English I: ...Other Lines". Written in descriptive notation and republished a few years ago by Harding Simpole.


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