Hot answers tagged

29

I am not an arbiter, but here's what the rules say: Rule 4.3 (emphasis added) if the player having the move touches on the chessboard, with the intention of moving or capturing I think it should be clear to any reasonable person that picking up a piece that was knocked down by a spectator does not imply intent to move. Perhaps the arbiter went with an ...


20

When FIDE tournament rules apply: If you displace one or more pieces – knocking off the board, intentionally or unintentionally, is a displacement – you have to re-establish the correct position on your own time (Art. 7.4.1). While it is not specifically mentioned, I would say that you have to do this at once; if you wait, that could be regarded as an ...


18

According to the Laws of Chess: 7.4.1 If a player displaces one or more pieces, he shall re-establish the correct position in his own time. Of course, in this situation, it is not the player who displaced one or more pieces. I believe that another rule would therefore be in effect: 7.6 If, during a game it is found that any piece has been displaced ...


13

When did this happen? Because there is no reasonable interpretation of the current rules by which a TD should have upheld the touch-move claim. I went back and looked at the 3rd Edition rulebook, and it doesn't say that a piece has to be "on the chessboard" to count for touch-move. So in 1987, a TD who was being a "strict constructionist" about the rules ...


9

Is it OK per the rules to adjust your opponent's pieces? YES The rules are clear: 4.2.1 Only the player having the move may adjust one or more pieces on their squares, provided that he first expresses his intention (for example by saying “j’adoube” or “I adjust”). 4.2.2 Any other physical contact with a piece, except for clearly accidental ...


6

You don't have grounds to demand the time control you like. In practice I suppose that if your opponent agrees, you could get away with using whatever time control you both want as long as the game finishes on time, which is the main point the organizers care about. One thing that the USCF rules do cover is what to do if the stipulated time control has a ...


5

You are close, but not quite right. I just spoke with a friend of mine, who has been a tournament director for over 40 years, USCF Senior TD Henry L. Terrie III (Hal Terrie). He told me that when you post a USCF tournament, you need to specify the delay, or it is assumed to be 5 seconds. So, while you cannot demand G/25 d5, you can demand G/30 d5 since it ...


3

I am not an arbiter, but I find existing answers lacking in detail. This particular rule became stricter on July 1, 2017. Until then, the relevant rules read: 4.2 Provided that he first expresses his intention (for example by saying “j’adoube” or “I adjust”), only the player having the move may adjust one or more pieces on their squares. 4.3 ...


3

If the tournament advance publicity specifies G/30 with no delay, then that is the time control. There is nothing in the USCF rulebook that would give you or your opponent either grounds to request a different time control, nor discretion to agree to a different time control. Per USCF rule 5B1c and 5B2, the time control really should appear in the ...


3

Probably not technically if everyone played a lot of rapid games, however, I have seen organizers do this before since the regular ratings usually have a more established basis. In other words, because people have usually played a lot more standard rated games, in that respect, they are more accurate. It helps prevent sandbagging. In reality, in rapid and ...


3

Years ago I worked with these as just a hobbyist. I downloaded a resource document about an old piece of software called Tournament Administrator. The source site is gone, but the Internet Wayback Machine still had it from 2006 (2008 corrupted): https://web.archive.org/web/20060622121352/http://www.georgejohn.bcentralhost.com:80/GeorgeJohn/Chess/USCF/...


3

Google turned up many ways to read or convert DBF files as well as detailed descriptions of the contents. See the gory details here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.dbf#File_architecture_overview and yet more gory here: http://www.dbase.com/Knowledgebase/INT/db7_file_fmt.htm with more details still at this site http://web.archive.org/web/20150323061445/http:...


3

But in practice what is the average encountered in all or most tournaments? Or even a distribution for high endish , low endish, middling value? And which of those is prevalent? This page will let you see every tournament that was rated in a particular state in a particular month. It takes a little effort from there to click through and see what the time ...


2

Rapid ratings cover a very wide range of time controls and bump up against regular (where games are dual rated) It is perhaps worth spelling these out for those outside the US who are unfamiliar with USCF time controls. According to the USCF's Official Rules of Chess (thanks, DM, for the link!): 5C. Ratable time controls. There are three rating ...


2

There's a tradeoff involved here. On the one hand, blitz ratings tend to reflect a player's strength in blitz (by definition). But on the other hand, most players play many more standard rated games, meaning that rating could be considered more accurate. In general though, standard ratings are a reasonable enough indicator of blitz results. Most players who ...


2

Depends on where you live. In US forget FIDE tournaments until you are very strong and like to travel. There are many USCF tournaments. To maximise your initial rating you should play in a national open not a local tournament. If the local players, which often happens, are low rated compared to their real ability then you will start out with a lower ...


1

You are permitted to adjust any piece when it is your move. If one opponent was careless and never centered a piece after a move there should be no problem if you adjust it. If the piece was reasonably placed and you did it anyway, or if you adjusted it for some quirk like wanting the horsies to face forward or sideways then the arbiter might consider that ...


1

No. They are used because too few people have faster ratings in many tournaments. They are generally as accurate for pairing as other rating would be although some players do play better at fast speeds so it would not be as good as truly VALID speed ratings for ALL players would be. They might actually be better as the speed rating bracket covers way ...


1

They are not really lower. That depends on the person. Most lower rated players train the wrong way to be able to play speedier chess well, or at least better than very slow chess games. GMs can play speed chess quite well and most would not have a lower speed rating than for slow OTB games. Exacerbating the problem is digital clocks with all their ...


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