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31

I am not an arbiter, but here's what the rules say: Rule 4.3 (emphasis added) if the player having the move touches on the chessboard, with the intention of moving or capturing I think it should be clear to any reasonable person that picking up a piece that was knocked down by a spectator does not imply intent to move. Perhaps the arbiter went with an ...


23

Would it be sufficient here to write Ne4+ (meaning Nce4) only (i.e. without the "c" but with "+"), as Nfe4 would not be check? It depends on exactly what you mean by "sufficient". By "normal" definitions of "sufficient" the answer is obviously "yes". "Ne4+" disambiguates and leaves the human reader in no doubt which knight was moved. However it doesn't ...


18

I took the following data from the September 2013 Golden Database1 and "active" players are players with a USCF membership expiration date later than January 1, 20132. All ratings are regular ratings. Note that players have an established rating after completing 25 games. USCF Active Players Established Ratings 46,574 Players 1315.99 Mean Rating 1390 ...


18

There are actually three different distinctions in the USCF system that have to do with a 2200 rating. First is the National Master title. It is awarded to anyone who has ever had an established (not provisional) rating of over 2200. Once a player is a National Master, they have the title for life no matter what happens to their rating. The NM title has no ...


18

The FIDE Laws of Chess 2018 are unambiguous: you should write Nce4, and the + sign is optional and not disambiguating. Ne4+ is not sufficient. Appendix C (algebraic notation), article C.10 basically tells you to write Nce4 to distinguish it from Nfe4. It does not mention check or other ways to disambiguate. Article C.13 notes that writing "+" to indicate ...


18

When FIDE tournament rules apply: If you displace one or more pieces – knocking off the board, intentionally or unintentionally, is a displacement – you have to re-establish the correct position on your own time (Art. 7.4.1). While it is not specifically mentioned, I would say that you have to do this at once; if you wait, that could be regarded as an ...


17

According to the Laws of Chess: 7.4.1 If a player displaces one or more pieces, he shall re-establish the correct position in his own time. Of course, in this situation, it is not the player who displaced one or more pieces. I believe that another rule would therefore be in effect: 7.6 If, during a game it is found that any piece has been displaced ...


14

When did this happen? Because there is no reasonable interpretation of the current rules by which a TD should have upheld the touch-move claim. I went back and looked at the 3rd Edition rulebook, and it doesn't say that a piece has to be "on the chessboard" to count for touch-move. So in 1987, a TD who was being a "strict constructionist" about the rules ...


11

After white plays the first move in the forced sequence, black's best move (with USCF rules) would be to let the clock run out because it would be a draw. No, it wouldn't be a draw if there was a forced mate and the losing side ran the clock out. Under USCF rule 14E: The game is drawn even when a player exceeds the time limit if one of the following ...


10

Per FIDE rules 6.10a and 6.10b (I am including the latter since it is so closely related in that it can require the arbiter to adjust the times based on judgment): 6.10 a. Every indication given by the clocks is considered to be conclusive in the absence of any evident defect. A chess clock with an evident defect shall be replaced. The ...


9

The FIDE rules say this: 7.5 If during a game it is found that an illegal move has been completed, the position immediately before the irregularity shall be reinstated. If the position immediately before the irregularity cannot be determined, the game shall continue from the last identifiable position prior to the irregularity. Articles 4.3 and ...


8

The USCF has two independent systems for naming players' levels: 1) Rating-based: Senior Master (2400+), National Master (2200-2399), Expert (2000-2199), Class A (1800-1999), Class B (1600-1799), etc. This describes your current rating; you can be Class A today and Class B next week. The one exception is that once your rating gets to 2200, you are a master ...


8

The correct decision here is to send the players back to finish their game. There's a very good rule of thumb that TD's use in situations like this - if the two players don't agree on the result of the game (there's no "meeting of the minds" between the players), they should go back to the board and continue the game. It's up to the TD to set the clock ...


7

You don't have grounds to demand the time control you like. In practice I suppose that if your opponent agrees, you could get away with using whatever time control you both want as long as the game finishes on time, which is the main point the organizers care about. One thing that the USCF rules do cover is what to do if the stipulated time control has a ...


7

Can you resign in a stalemated position? No. Stalemate ends the game. Nothing further is possible after that. According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 5.2.1 The game is drawn when the player to move has no legal move and his king is not in check. The game is said to end in ‘stalemate’. This immediately ends the game, provided that the move producing the ...


7

You have misunderstood the rules. What you describe is incompatible with the FIDE Laws of Chess. There is no concept of "insufficient material". This is what they say: 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s king with any series of legal moves. The game is said to end in a ‘dead ...


6

According to my copy of US Chess Federation's Official Rules of Chess (5th Edition), rule 14B2 states: If a player offers a draw while the opponent's clock is running, the opponent may accept or reject the offer. A player who offers a draw in this manner may be warned or penalized for annoying the opponent (20G). Note that it says "may", not "must". ...


6

Is it OK per the rules to adjust your opponent's pieces? YES The rules are clear: 4.2.1 Only the player having the move may adjust one or more pieces on their squares, provided that he first expresses his intention (for example by saying “j’adoube” or “I adjust”). 4.2.2 Any other physical contact with a piece, except for clearly accidental ...


6

This was more of a problem with the earlier generation (early 2000's) of digital clocks. One of them had a fault which meant that if you gave it a bit of a smack then the battery might jiggle inside, momentarily interrupting the electricity supply and it would reset. The post 2010 clocks don't have this problem, probably they just fitted a small capacitor ...


5

I don't know about USCF rules, but according to FIDE Laws of Chess, article 9.1.b.1: A player wishing to offer a draw shall do so after having made a move on the chessboard and before pressing his clock. An offer at any other time during play is still valid but Article 11.5 must be considered. Where article 11.5 is about distracting the opponent and ...


5

I suspect it's a result of you not really knowing the rating of the player you're playing. Posted rating for a player in a tournament is typically already out of date. You can see it in more detail by checking the actual rating report of the event you played in (http://www.uschess.org/datapage/event-search.php) and you can see what the real rating of the ...


5

You are close, but not quite right. I just spoke with a friend of mine, who has been a tournament director for over 40 years, USCF Senior TD Henry L. Terrie III (Hal Terrie). He told me that when you post a USCF tournament, you need to specify the delay, or it is assumed to be 5 seconds. So, while you cannot demand G/25 d5, you can demand G/30 d5 since it ...


5

Is there any rule regarding having a lot of mistakes? Furthermore, what if you deliberately make mistakes such as writing in a random move every turn? There is no obvious rule against this. The obvious place to start for FIDE is article 8.1.1: Article 8: The recording of the moves 8.1.1 In the course of play each player is required to record his own moves ...


4

An updated rating distribution graph: The data is from the Golden Database. It uses data from just current members with established (non provisional) ratings. Note that only "regular" ratings are shown, not Quick ratings or blitz ratings. The overall shape of the graph, of course, is almost identical to the first one, with data from 2013.


4

You do not get moved out of your bracket. If you're a B-player in the Expert section, expect to finish at the bottom. I'm not even sure if you're allowed to 'play up' unless you play in the open section.


4

There is no way to directly compare ratings from distinct populations. However, it's not true that online chess and OTB populations are really distinct. There are players who have ratings in both OTB and online chess. So, you can compare your rating this way: Find players in Chesscube who has also OTB ratings, select two of them, both have ratings close ...


4

It seems that rankade, our ranking system for sports, games, and more, fits your needs. It's free to use and it's designed to manage rankings (and stats, including matchup stats, and more) for small to large groups of players. Rankade doesn't use Elo, but its algorithm (called ree algorithm), although more complex (here's a comparison between most known ...


4

If the tournament advance publicity specifies G/30 with no delay, then that is the time control. There is nothing in the USCF rulebook that would give you or your opponent either grounds to request a different time control, nor discretion to agree to a different time control. Per USCF rule 5B1c and 5B2, the time control really should appear in the ...


4

Per Chris Bird, the USCF's "FIDE Events Manager", the USCF only pays for GM, IM, WGM, and WIM titles. FM(WFM) and CM(WCM) are the responsibility of the player. The USCF still applies on your behalf, but you pay the fee. The fees are currently as follows: Grandmaster/WGM: 330 Euro International Master/WIM: 165 Euro FIDE Master/WFM: 70 Euro Candidate ...


3

This may be partially due to ratings floors. When a player hits his rating floor, his rating cannot go lower if he loses, but his opponent's rating can still go higher. This adds ratings points into the system. There is an absolute rating floor of 100 which nobody can go below. (For every event you play in and quarter-point you win over the board, this is ...


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