10 votes
Accepted

Hanham Variation Philidor Defense

No. Black cannot reach the Hanham variation (e.g. the Philidor setup with Nd7, Nf6, e5 and sometimes c6) by force. The modern move order to reach the Hanham variation, however, is 1. e4 d6! 2. d4 Nf6 ...
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8 votes

Marshall Defense 1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nf6 — transpositions

If you don't take on d5, I think the only advantage black has gained is flexibility. That means he can choose his opening according to your move. But you can be almost 100% sure that the opening will ...
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  • 1,608
8 votes

How this game is denoted as French Advanced Variation?

I apologize for posting a comment as an answer, but this is the only way for me to include diagrams, which I find helpful. You have entered Advanced French defense by transposition. After 1.e4 d5 2....
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7 votes
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Why is 5...Be7 played before ...b5 in the main line of the Closed Ruy Lopez?

After 5....b5 6.Bb3 Be7, white has the strong option to play 7.d4. Now, 7....exd4 is a mistake, as white obtains a big advantage after 8.e5 Ne4 9.Bd5, which was played in Grischuk-Nepomniachtchi (...
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  • 5,428
7 votes
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Transposition into KID

It is a matter of choice Many grandmasters (e.g. world champion Viswanathan Anand) have consistently played 1.c4 e5 with Black. Others favour the KID or other defenses : Hedgehog (with b6), ...
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  • 12.8k
6 votes
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How to understand which positions result from certain opening

the absence of Black's C pawn and the fight against the D5 square That's more or less it. This kind of position is most probably the result of a Sicilian. Could it be something else? It can, but the ...
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  • 21.3k
6 votes
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1. e4 e6 2. d4 c5 - is this opening worth it?

You need to realize that just because someone gave it that name on move two, that it is certainly going to transpose to another opening with a different name. When determining what opening is played, ...
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  • 31.9k
5 votes

Marshall Defense 1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nf6 — transpositions

Another possible transposition after 3. Nc3: After 1. d4 d5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 we arrive at a variation of the Chigorin Defense. A particularly tricky line is the following. [FEN ""] [Title "...
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5 votes
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Transposition Tables

When you shut off the engine and turn it back on, its transposition table has been cleared. In order to continue using the saved positions, a database of some sort would be needed. This would keep ...
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4 votes
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Marshall Defense transposition to Gruenfeld

Black can only transpose to the Grunfeld if you play Nc3, so there are other candidate moves you can try to prove Blacks play is unsound. (The idea being that we want to play e4 against Nxd5 and Black ...
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  • 6,073
4 votes

How this game is denoted as French Advanced Variation?

As explained in the fine answer by AlwaysLearningNewStuff, you have transposed into the Advanced French. Such transpositions are common in chess. That's why, if you are assigning an opening to a ...
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  • 20.3k
4 votes

Three-fold repetition and null move

No. You shouldn't count null-move in repetitions because: Null-move is fake Null-move artificially creates a repetition when there is none Your implementation is correct, but you might want to ...
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  • 21.4k
3 votes

Why is it said that beginning with 1. Nf3 2. c4 avoids the Benoni but beginning with 1. d4 2. c4 does not?

With both move orders white can avoid the Benoni. The difference is all about which sidelines you allow and which ones you don't. 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 is generally considered the most flexible move order ...
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2 votes

Can the Nc3+e3 Chebanenko Slav, the Exchange Slav and the 4...Bg4 Slow Slav transpose into each other?

No, they don't transpose to Exchange Slavs. In the Slow Slav and the Chebanenko, white plays e3 to prevent trouble with the c4 pawn. The bishop stays inside the pawn chain which is somewhat passive, ...
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  • 25.8k
2 votes
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Is there any transposition available in between QGA and other openings?

One transposition white can try is from the French Exchange variation (if you know your opponent plays the French). [FEN ""] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. c4 dxc4 (4... Nf6) 5. Bxc4 It ...
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2 votes

What are all the most common transpositions between the Caro-Kann Panov–Botvinnik Attack with 5...e6 6. Nf3 Bb4 and the Nimzo-Indian Defence?

There are indeed a couple of transpositions from the Nimzo-Indian to the Panov variation of the Caro-Kann and they occur sometimes in practical games. Using a database of chess games, they can be ...
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  • 5,428
2 votes

Marshall Defense 1.d4 d5 2.c4 Nf6 — transpositions

Playing 2...Nf6 requires black's willingness to play 3.cxd5 c6 lines, because black really needs a pawn recapture on d5. If he is ok with that and is prepared schematically for the lines arising after ...
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  • 1,908
2 votes

Most different openings by transpositions?

Another well-known example is the following: [fen ""] 1. f4 {Bird's Opening} 1... e5 {From Gambit} 2. e4 {King's Gambit} 2... d5 {Falkbeer Counter Gambit} 3. exd5 exf4 {King's Gambit Accepted} A ...
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  • 3,924
2 votes

Is there a root tree of openings based on response by Black and vice versa?

I think what you are looking for is something like https://chesstempo.com/opening-training/ or https://openings.chessbase.com/ In both cases, you can build opening move trees (either for White or for ...
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  • 5,774
2 votes

Marshall Defense transposition to Gruenfeld

This is effectively a pawn-down gambit line for Black. If you're going to play it, be psychologically prepared. White does not have to go for the Grunfeld if they don't want to. The key line is 4. Qa4+...
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  • 21.3k
2 votes
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Transposition Tables Bug, implementation produces different results

I am not sure I understand your exact code but my guess here is that you return a transposition table result, no matter the depth of the entry. So if you encounter a position and calculate it one ply ...
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  • 2,532
2 votes

How to understand which positions result from certain opening

The biggest clue is the pawn structure. Allure's first diagram hints that is was a Grunfeld due to the queenside pawns. (Although since there are so many transpositions that the opening can change on ...
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  • 5,123
1 vote

How to understand which positions result from certain opening

Some positions have clues which at least rule out certain openings, even if they don't identify one specific opening. For example, if a pawn is still at home, then the opening wasn't one in which that ...
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  • 5,562
1 vote

Transposition into KID

A lot of players play a setup similar to their main response to d4 in order to narrow their rep. Maybe the positions are objectively a little inferior but it gets the player a position they know and ...
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  • 3,963
1 vote

1. e4 e6 2. d4 c5 - is this opening worth it?

I've toyed with this idea in the past but never played it seriously. If you're okay with the transpositions there is nothing wrong with it at all. After 1.e4, e6 2. d4, c5 white has three main ...
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  • 3,963
1 vote
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Are there any sources of massive transposition tables?

What you're talking about is basically opening books. If an engine has access to hard-set evaluations of common positions fairly early on in the game, then it can play better. But having a pre-made ...
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1 vote
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Opening classification and transpositions

Your question has two different nuances, that is, how to classify an opening and how to classify a game. The Encyclopedia of Chess Openings' only aim is to classify the first moves of a chess game, ...
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1 vote

Why is it said that beginning with 1. Nf3 2. c4 avoids the Benoni but beginning with 1. d4 2. c4 does not?

The simple version, with no variations: With 1 Nf3 2 c4 White is basically declaring the desire not to play Benoni. And if Black decides to go for it willy-nilly, Black knows they will quite likely ...
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  • 5,164
1 vote

Why is it said that beginning with 1. Nf3 2. c4 avoids the Benoni but beginning with 1. d4 2. c4 does not?

One of the main ideas of hypermodern defenses such as the Benoni is to chisel away at white's 'big' centre with moves like 2...c5 after 1.d4 Nf6, and 2.c4 (chewing away at the d4 pawn). A move order ...
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