29

Hovering your hand over the pieces does not violate the touch-move rule, but it is bad etiquette and arguably violates the rule against annoying your opponent ("It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever.", say the FIDE Laws of Chess, §11.5 in the 2018 edition.) Here's the explanation given in Chess for Dummies: ...


27

You are absolutely allowed to call the arbiter when it is your opponent's turn. There are any number of reasons why this would be necessary. To start with the most prosaic, you have filled your scoresheet and need another one. You are feeling unwell and need medical assistance Your opponent has picked up a piece but isn't sure where to move it to. They are ...


27

There are a number of serious things wrong with what you describe: While they are thinking and holding the piece You may hold a captured piece while you think but you may not hold a piece that is part of the current position. Your opponent has a right to a full view of the current position on the board at all times except the second or two it takes you to ...


24

I haven't seen the series, but this was a quite common practice known as adjournment. It is indeed legal to ask for outside help, in the form of teammates and even computer programs during adjournment. However, they rarely happen anymore: With the advent of strong chess playing computer programs, which can be used to analyze adjourned positions, most ...


16

A chessgames.com user has made a compilation of consultation games. For example, it contains Lasker / Pillsbury vs Steinitz / Chigorin. According to a comment by user TheFocus, it was "played in St. Petersburg, Russia on January 29, 1896."


15

There still aren't as many OTB tournaments as there were in 2019, but they're starting to come back. You can find USCF rated tournaments at this link. Just make sure to set the "Online" option to "No" if you only want OTB tournaments, and then you can search by date range and either state or proximity. Bear in mind that that for these ...


14

Not exactly a prize, but answers your question in spirit: Immortal Losing Game Wikipedia's summary of the game is: The Immortal Losing Game is a chess game between the Soviet grandmaster David Bronstein and the Polish International Master Bogdan Śliwa played in 1957 in Gotha. The name is an allusion to the more famous Immortal Game between Adolf Anderssen ...


13

Sure why not! The important thing is to enjoy the game and learn whatever life lessons you can take from it along the journey. Chess offers tremendous companionship and fun and that is what is more important than focusing on results (which will inevitably follow as you keep improving learn from your mistakes). Make sure you keep a database of the games --- ...


12

How would FIDE handle a player with ADHD who is rightfully prescribed amphetamines? FIDE handles this in the same way as all Olympic sports handle such things. Anybody who follows such sports (particularly cycling) will be familiar with "Therapeutic Use Exemptions" or TUEs. They are covered in the FIDE Anti Doping Rules: 4.4 Therapeutic Use ...


12

Grandmasters are financially incentivized to play in GM-norm invitational tournaments. The incentive can take different forms depending on the organisers' choice. Most often, GM are invited (travel, hotel and meals paid, with no fee asked for playing) and they compete for the money prizes in the tournament (usually the top 3 out of 10 players get money ...


11

If the arbiter really signed with your signature, instead of his, then he just committed a crime (forgery of documents). He could have signed with his signature as proof that he confirmed the result of the game and everything on the scoresheet. If the arbiter really forged your signature, then as a first step you should lodge a complaint against the arbiter ...


10

FIDE 12.6 says: It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. This includes unreasonable claims, unreasonable offers of a draw or the introduction of a source of noise into the playing area. There is no mention of this applying only on one's opponent's turn. "introduction of a source of noise into the playing area" ...


9

Am I obligated to let an opponent see my game record so they can make corrections to theirs? According to USCF rule 15D3, it's suggested that you do so, but it's not mandatory unless the tournament director tells you to: The opponent is urged to comply with such a request, but this is not mandatory. If the opponent denies the request, the player may stop ...


9

It's not late. Starting early in only important if you aim at the very top. I've had a student who started in his forties and managed to enjoy hundreds of games of competitive chess, with somewhat decent results (he reached 1800 while having a full-time job and a family). Join a chess club and play your first tournament as soon as you can. Also, what is your ...


8

There is no rule saying that you can call the arbiter only on your turn, or that the opponent is allowed to distract you during their own turn. If you want a more specific answer, you may need to give more details of the situation, for example what the nature of the distraction was. It seems a bit unlikely, but one can imagine some behaviour by the opponent ...


8

Junior tournaments in the US doesn't narrow it down very much. As a chess player living in the US your first stop should always be the US Chess Federation website. If you are looking for tournaments then the USCF has a webpage which allows you to search for "Upcoming Tournaments". You can apply filters for the dates, type of events (Junior Grand ...


8

From FIDE's arbiter manual: "11.5 It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever." I think picking up a piece and keeping it out of the board for a long time is quite disturbing. As far as I know there's no problem on picking up a piece and placing it back on its original square as long as it's the piece you finally move....


7

The rules FIDE use in calculating a player's first rating are outlined in the FIDE Rating Regulations effective from 1 July 2017. The relevant sections are: 6.1 If an unrated player scores zero in his first tournament, his score and that of his opponents against him are disregarded. Otherwise if an unrated player has played rated games, then this result is ...


7

Go ahead! A lichess rapid rating around 2000 is quite good, there must be a lot of players in national open (or club) tournaments not reaching that rating. But study some theory also ...


7

For invitationals generally the organizers will pay (or the invited players won't accept the invitation). For open tournaments it's a different matter, and the players themselves pay. An event like "Serbia open masters" might be funded by Serbia's chess organization, though (I have not checked).


6

It seems to be quite a lot worse than the Danish. Stockfish Nnue gives around -0.57 at depth 33 for the Danish (after 4.Bc4), while the Ryder has around -2.36 at depth 32 (in the position after 5...Qxd4 6.Be3). It's true these are just surface level engine evaluations. However, considering the book you're referencing on the Ryder came out in 2011, I highly ...


6

Incidentally I'm a national arbiter and a passionate player at the same time. Here is the rules side: FIDE rule 11.1 forbids the player to do anything bringing chess in miscredit. We have no yellow card (actually, I do have one in my arbiter kit, just in case :-) but insulting the arbiter definitely falls under 11.1 and is punishable by all the 12.9. ...


6

The first thing to note is that for low level tournaments there is not even a requirement for a qualified arbiter to be on site. The arbiter must be a licensed arbiter (International Arbiter, FIDE Arbiter or National Arbiter) but is not required to actually be there. They can be at home watching TV. If there is a problem they can be consulted on the phone. ...


6

All three. For top players, it's the organizer who foots the bill just to get the name value. For some countries, they'll pay for their players to travel to a well-known tournament to show the "greatness" of their country. The less famous tournaments couldn't afford a top 20 GM, but have been known to "bribe" lower GMs, hoping other GMs ...


5

There is no reason you can't get into competitive chess unless you hold yourself back. I played as a child and into my late teens and then stopped. It wasn't until around 8-10 years ago that I picked it back up and playing in competitively in tournaments only recently. I know the chances are really low that I'd become a GM but if I become a local good club ...


5

Suppose that, during a round of an official FIDE-rated tournament, I insult the arbiter privately (they notice), without distracting any of the other players. Could I get expelled from the tournament or lose that game? You are letting your solipsism get the better of you. As long as you have paid your entry fee for the tournament the officials don't care ...


5

The only difference is the sequence they are written down. Some like WLD so you can easily see the difference in scores. Some like WDL as that goes from best to worst in sequence, but makes it harder to compute the difference at a glance. Compare to TV channels showing football scores. some have score1 team1 score2 team 2 others have team 1 score1 score2 ...


5

Factually you ask two different things, "how" and "why", and maybe considering the "how" first makes things clearer. Obviously, the FIDE time control is recent. In early history of chess there was no time control at all, the problem with that should be obvious. I am old enough to have played 40 moves/2 hours + adjournment, thus ...


5

Never heard of. A few thoughts: As we all know :-), chess is a draw. win 3/draw 1/loss 0 tournaments do exist (same rule idea, less drastic). In Swiss tournaments, I say this would be an invitation to even more "Swiss gambit" (although evidently you can't overtake in the last round, as all scores are integer) It's also pointless for an 1:1 match, ...


5

Have there been any tournaments where a draw is 0 points for both sides? The answer is "Yes" and surprisingly enough the tournaments where this was the case were the very top world tournament, the world championships! After Fischer won the title in 1972 by the score of 12½–8½ in a traditional best-of-24 competition with draws counting, he demanded ...


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