25

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


16

It is not a drawn position according to the rules, since there is sufficient mating material. It may be a draw from the point of view of endgame theory, but given players who make lots of mistakes, it wouldn't be all that surprising for one to lose to a tactic. I would let them play until the player who wanted a draw can claim it based on the 50-move rule ...


11

There is an article by Geurt Gijssen on Chess Cafe (4th question asked) that touches on the event that the clock's initial time control being incorrectly configured, but only noticed much later in the game. He quotes the FIDE rules: The Laws of Chess cannot cover all possible situations that may arise during a game, nor can they regulate all ...


10

The situation is not very different to two training partners or tweo friends being paired. The dilemma between sportsmanship and friendship is the same. Are you allowed to "misuse" personal information about weaknesses of your opponent? Should you pre-arrange a result to fit the needs of each other? The keyword is sportsmanship here. You are playing in a ...


7

In a nutshell, current rules allow pretty much any sort of "spontaneous" agreement to a draw at the board, even if one side is staring at a forced mate in 6. If money changes hands or the results were agreed to before sitting down to play, it's a violation of the rules, but it's hard to enforce because folks who do that do it without witnesses to the act. ...


6

It's better to let them play it out a bit and ideally only draw once reaching 50 moves. But if one of them is low on time (and their opponent is clearly just trying to flag them) then you should claim the draw.


6

When my club attended tournaments, we'd just ask the TD to not pair us if possible. We'd explain we played each other every week and would prefer new opponents. The TDs were always understanding and accommodating.


5

The biggest thing that caught me was the new clock "delay" style. I had to buy a new clock to be able to use mine in a tournament, after taking a break from 2000 to 2010. My old, somewhat expensive digital clock only had "bronstein", where you add time each move. The newer digital clocks all support the "delay" setting, where you can delay starting the timer ...


5

It is difficult to say what the exact rules should be if you aren't affiliated with a group that publishes rules for such situations. But I think your actions in this case were reasonable. USCF rule 14H used to state that a player with less than two minutes on the clock (with no delay or increment being used) could make a claim of insufficient losing ...


4

You do not get moved out of your bracket. If you're a B-player in the Expert section, expect to finish at the bottom. I'm not even sure if you're allowed to 'play up' unless you play in the open section.


4

I don't really see the problem, and if I had a brother, I'd probably keen to compete. Just try to play your best game, and ask your brother to do the same. Maybe you should try to play against the position on the board, not against the person. And in the end, chess is still "just a game". It would be sad if one of you couldn't deal with this.


4

The most brazen example of this occurred in a tournament in 1975 in Luton, England when Tony Miles (Britain's first native born over the board IGM) and Stewart Reuben (now a respectable member of the FIDE rules commission) agreed a draw without playing any moves. Miles needed a draw to win the competition and for Reuben a draw against a much stronger player ...


3

Yes. But most players are much smarter with how they do it by using other ways than you suggest. Two GMs could agree to play a tame opening that is known to be drawish then settle for a draw after 20 moves or whatever the current rule limit is. Personally I think they should have to play at least 40 moves if not the whole game until a draw is the ...


3

Relevant FIDE rule, appendix G.5: If Article G.4 [a player may claim extra time for both sides] does not apply and the player having the move has less than two minutes left on his clock, he may claim a draw before his flag falls. He shall summon the arbiter and may stop the chessclock (see Article 6.12 b). He may claim on the basis that his opponent ...


2

The one I like is Vega - http://www.vegachess.com/tl/index.php. This is free on Linux. The guy who wrote it is an open source supporter who welcomes feedback and is willing to make changes. He is also an active FIDE arbiter. It is also free on Windows for up to 30 players and 50 euros for unlimited use. There is a review by an English arbiter here - http://...


2

The US Chess Federation Official Rules of Chess 5th Edition has a section (section 33, if you have a copy) that has some guidelines about prizes. These are specifically described as recommendations and not rules. A ratio of 10 to 1 between the top prize and the entry fee for serious tournaments is suggested (and perhaps even more if you want to attract top ...


2

The answer to this question depends at least in part on what rating system you want to use when running an event, as well as what your definition of "good" is. It's worth noting that pairing programs require a lot of time, testing and maintenance. So, if you see "good" as synonymous with "cheap" or "free", there probably isn't anything available that will ...


1

The FIDE's software Swiss manager has a free demo version. It contains many options for different types of "tournaments". But you will need a bit of time to learn how to use it. I have already used this program with success.


1

There are no official guidelines for how big the prizes should be or even if they should even be money. As an example our club winter swiss starting in January is offering $500, $375, $250, $175, $100 in the open section and $150, $100, $50 in under 1850 section. The amounts of the prizes for the different places is not something you should obsess about. ...


1

I am not proud about it, but I am gonna confess once at last round of a 3rd cathegory regional tournament I was virtually classified with a draw for playing in 2nd cathegory and my oponnent also classified, needing both the 1/2 point, and we agree a draw before the game. We were from the same club and another player I met on University ask me directly to do ...


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