68

That only works in blitz time controls with no increment. If you accept games with no increment you are basically agreeing that flagging is part of the game and sportsmanlike. If you personally find it unsporting then always play with an increment and decline challenges with no increment.


41

In blitz, time is a major factor in the game, and it is fine to try and win on time. If you used too much time, and your opponent thinks he can flag you, there is nothing wrong with that. It is part of the game.


37

Time is a resource in blitz chess, as much as or even more so than material. If it isn't unsportsmanlike to capture your opponent's material, how is it unsportsmanlike to capture their time? In blitz chess, there is often a time-endgame. Otherwise pointless checks and random-looking moves are part of this endgame. From my perspective, this is part of what ...


28

As I commented, there are several reasons why people play fast, among them: One of the reasons I often see is fear of time trouble. Many amateurs are not really aware of whether the time they have left will "be enough", so start to move way too fast early on. They won't feel confident to play faster games either for that same reason. It could be the case ...


24

waste their time If it's clear that they are able to win within the time they have left, this could be considered bad sportsmanship. However, in those situations the number of remaining checks is usually quite low. win the game on time If that's a possibility, I'd say it's perfectly fine to play on if you're losing on the board. At the beginning of the ...


18

Who better to answer this question than the legendary former World Champion and master of opening preparation Garry Kasparov himself? I quote In June 2005 in New York I gave a special training session to a group of the leading young players in the United States. I had asked them each to bring two of their games for us to review, one win and one loss....


17

I see it all the time on the net It also happens a lot over the board. There are two main reasons players play the moves very fast when they have a lot of time: They are in their preparation and the game may conclude (with a win or pre-arranged draw) before they leave their preparation. You often see this at the highest levels. They are sufficiently far ...


12

I think the biggest reason is that using your time efficiently is an acquired skill just as learning tactics is. When you are not as strong, you do not know as much, and thus, you do not have as much to think about. As you acquire more overall chess skill, you have more to think about, and thus, you spend more time thinking. It is also a matter of practice. ...


11

FIDE rules allow you to record the time: 8.1.4 The scoresheet shall be used only for recording the moves, the times of the clocks, offers of a draw, matters relating to a claim and other relevant data. https://www.fide.com/fide/handbook.html?id=208&view=article USCF rules also allow you to record the time: 20C. Use of notes prohibited. The ...


10

Blitz is a bit of a different chess "animal". In order to play blitz well, you need a few things, and that is great tactical vision, good time management, and some positional skill so you can make decent moves quickly in quieter positions. It also helps to be young because you think faster when you are young. The first part to getting better is obvious, and ...


9

I had the same thought myself. For a couple tournaments, I started playing lines which I had calculated out with about 10 seconds of thought on each move. My results were terrible. The reason, I think, is that the extra move being played on the board gives you quite a bit of added calculation power. I now take more time on the moves following a long think ...


9

What improves your chess is the time you spend thinking on chess and solving chess problems (either during a game or when doing exercices). As a consequence, if your concern is to make progress, a 5' blitz is better than five 1' bullets. What you will play will look more like a real chess game; at 1300-1400 I suppose you seldom drop pieces in blitz, but ...


9

It's also a possible strategy to play with the opponent's mind by playing quick and ideal (or unexpected) moves, though it can be very risky and backfire. Depending on how mentally strong a player is, seeing a few quick and ideal moves done in a succession by the opponent may pressure their mind. If they cannot cope up with the pressure, a blunder may be ...


8

It sounds like you were breaking the rules on several fronts. According to the FIDE Laws of Chess: 6.2.3 A player must press his clock with the same hand with which he made his move. It is forbidden for a player to keep his finger on the clock or to ‘hover’ over it. You would probably be punished under the illegal move rules: 7.5.2 If the player ...


7

There is some truth in what you say, time management obviously plays a role. I often feel that I can compete with IMs if I have twice the time. (Incidentally in my last game against an IM this theory was put to the test, he spent half of his time smoking and I managed to win the game). But, if the difference in playing strength between you and your opponent ...


7

Brian's fine answer already established you were breaching some rules, but here are some more basic FIDE rules: 4.6 [...] The move is then considered to have been made: a. in the case of a capture, when the captured piece has been removed from the chessboard and the player, having placed his own piece on its new square, ...


7

Seconds, and the players themselves, absolutely use engines to help them find moves, but you cannot just let an engine run and think that it will spit out useful things. There would be too much information, and most of it useless. First, nowadays, more and more, elite players are resorting to using Leela and Fat Fritz (neural network type programs) since ...


6

The two main things I do to avoid time trouble are: I write down the remaining time for each player after every move. This both keeps me very aware of the amount of time I have left, and lets me know how much time I have spent thinking so far on the current move, so I can take appropriate action if I've already been thinking for 5 minutes. I also try to ...


6

I'd nominate all of NM Dan Heisman's famous Novice Nook articles on Time Management (go to the link and search by subject). The *Two Move triggers* article is pretty insightful and most applicable to your posted question. In addition, the best way to learn how to manage time is to make "time taken" a part of your post-mortem review. In other words, don't ...


6

can I force a draw if I am running out of time? Of course! Just swap the queen for the rook. There are two basic possibilities. He keeps the king and rook very close (normal best practice when trying to draw this difficult endgame). In that case every time you threaten the rook with your queen he must move the rook and keep it close to the king. It should ...


5

This is a very bad habit you are getting in to. Of course it doesn't really matter if you lose to the computer in this situation but you will face something similar in OTB play with clocks. If you have 10 minutes left to finish the game and your opponent has less than 2 minutes then this is a very big advantage for you. If you are not playing with ...


5

Although replies by Brian Towers and StudentT are the right ones (both players would be disqualified) from a theoretical points of view it would be possible that a game has not ended in time for the next round to begin. I would even say that it's possible that it could actually happen in a tournament with 3 rounds per day. I case it would happen I guess the ...


5

Don't try to blitz him by playing fast; now you both are playing without thinking much and you've lost the point of the time advantage. In general, you should still just try to play the best moves. But if there is any general strategy, it is to avoid forced moves on both sides, so that he has more to consider on every move. Unless it is advantageous, don't ...


5

Chess has far too many possibilities to calculate. It also has time constraints, so at some point you always have to stop thinking and make a decision based on imperfect information. Barring forced moves and forced wins, you always have imperfect information and so you have to rely on judgment all the time. When Carlsen was considering Bxf7, he had to think ...


5

Is memorization necessary in modern chess? Depends highly from the opening you play. Should I do memorizing to saved time in middle game? Yes you should, but not in the way you assume it. If you play an opening that has volumes and volumes of lines to go through then you must memorize the lines. If the opening is playable only by playing "only moves"...


5

I know this is a very difficult situation to handle. It took me quite a long time to overcome this problem. The best thing is to think as fast as one can. Also try to increase your concentration and keep thinking even if it is your opponent's move, as this might reduce some of time. Study your games and make out which part (opening / middle game/ endgame) ...


5

At those timescales, communication between computers becomes a problem. For instance, it takes more than a millisecond (10-3 s) for me to ping my router. Even if you install a sort of timekeeper program on the computer itself, CPU clocks aren't reliable on such small timescales. Instead, it might be more interesting to run them on slower hardware.


5

For the 1300-1400 level, none are useful if you want to improve. More often than not, blitz and bullet (especially the latter) just develop bad habits, such as moving too quickly or having little patience for in-depth analysis. If you want to work on improving in 10 minutes, I'd suggest doing a few tactics, solving a study, or playing through a master game. ...


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