55

I feel like you somewhat misunderstand the concept of a time control. The clock is a part of the game. If you are up a piece in a complicated position with five seconds left on the clock that may well be a losing position for you. Sure, the engine may show you +4, but the clock is an important part, especially in blitz. Importantly, if you spent all your ...


46

K+R vs. K+R is a draw, but K+R+10 sec vs. K+R+20 sec is not a draw. Your opponent won because they had an advantage brought on by having better time management. Nothing to complain about -- time is an essential resource (sometimes more important than material) in blitz (or similar) chess. The only real answer to your question "How could I have better ...


25

For example 3|2 means each player starts with 3 minutes and gets 2 seconds added to the clock for making a move (this is called an "increment"). When there is no "|", you do not get any time for making a move, and each player gets the displayed time in minutes at the start of the game. Another notation you might see uses a "+", ...


25

Let's look at the title question from the perspective of engine chess, which is more objective in the sense that you can get two engines to play tens of thousands of games against each other at whatever time control you desire. If you look at the latest season of the unofficial world computer chess championship, you'll find that the strongest engine is ...


25

Of course there are times when it is correct to calculate on your opponent's time and times when it is not. What you need is some guidelines because sometimes it is even correct not to calculate on your own time! Don't calculate while you are in your opening prep Don't calculate when your move is completely forced. Be aware that recaptures are not forced. ...


22

Play starts when the arbiter announces the start of play, usually by saying "Start white's clock". A good arbiter will then walk round the tournament room making sure that all clocks have been started. If both players have yet to arrive at a table then the arbiter will start white's clock. If a black player has not started white's clock then the ...


20

Because not having it would result in some perverse incentives. In particular, in any game where a draw is an acceptable outcome, the optimal strategy without flag drops being losses would be to never make a move and simply wait for the flag. With any partial approach like you propose, the optimal strategy would instead be to try to force such a situation (...


20

Is there any established system for evaluating positions taking into account time for both players? No, there isn't. This is for two main reasons: There is no objective measure for how time affects a player's ability to play any given position. Such evaluations would be useless. They would literally tell you nothing useful Let me give an example from a ...


17

It depends on what you mean by "increments". If you are referring to something like "playing a game in 10m + 4s", then the main reason is preventing that a player with a huge material advantage (v.g. king plus rook versus king) doesn't lose on time. With the increment of 4 seconds after each move is made, the player with the advantage ...


14

It depends. There are two likely sets of rules: FIDE (which governs international events) and USCF (which governs United States events.) These rules differ slightly. Under FIDE rules, the default time is 0 minutes unless otherwise indicated. This means that, rather than start the clock of a missing White player, Black could simply claim immediate victory if ...


14

If you are sure not to make it over 50 moves for a draw, another option not yet mentioned is to try to trick your opponent. Likely they will also premove. For example if in a R+K vs R+K you are both moving the king around at some point prepare to move your rook to attack their rook even in an undefended way. Chances are they will have premoved the king and ...


13

Since you specifically asked for historical reasons: Think about your two proposed criteria in the context of the year 1800 or 1900. Using engine evaluation is obviously out of the question. So is "asking a better player", because you may often not have one at hand (physically, due to limited means of telecommunication!). Using material count is ...


11

Why this game does not end immediately as a draw by insufficient material? Two reasons. There is no rule regarding ‘insufficient material’. What there is is a draw due to a ‘dead position’. This is defined in article 5.2.2 of the FIDE Laws of Chess: 5.2.2 The game is drawn when a position has arisen in which neither player can checkmate the opponent’s ...


9

Except for exceptional circumstances, only three results are considered valid for a chess game (and the corresponding rating change): win, draw or loss. Your suggestion would come with a huge problem: what exactly counts as flagging? How big should your advantage have been for your opponent's victory to not count as a "real" victory? Who should ...


8

I have spent far too much time on this as is, but here we go. Time control phase X/Y means X moves in Y minutes for each player, + means increment per moves (in seconds). Steinitz's era An idiosyncratic era with matches decided by direct negotiations. 1886: Steinitz-Zukertort, FT10 wins with 8-8 or 9-9 declared as draw 30/120 then 15/60 1889: Steinitz-...


8

Interestingly there are two FIDE documents specifying these. Fortunately they don't contradict each other. First, FIDE Handbook - General Rules and Technical Recommendations for Tournaments / 07. Time Control / says: There is a single time control for all major FIDE events: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game ...


8

It's considered a win because that is what it is by definition from the rules of timed games. When you enter a game you commit to its rules; in this case one of those rules is that the time you have to force mate or other result is constrained by the clock, and you must adapt your strategy to meet that constraint. In the example you have given, you have not ...


7

Preface: When two players agree to play a timed game, they have agreed to take a loss if their timer ends before they can defeat their opponent. As such, time is a resource that affects every such match - time management should not be considered secondary to advantage on the board. Chess skill is not simply about being able to find the right moves, it's ...


6

Computers don't need infinite time to play perfectly. Nearly but not quite. They need exponential time according to Fraenkel and Licthenstein (Journal of combinational theory). Humans could theoretically achieve a similar result if they checked all positions and committed no errors in their calculations. Potentially having an extremely large number of ...


5

There is a big clue in the FIDE Laws of Chess in the section titled "Guidelines III. Games without increment including Quickplay Finishes" which deals with games or final parts of games with no increment in rapid and standard where one player is at risk of losing on time unjustified because they have a better or even winning position. A modified ...


5

I'm wondering if there is something of the sort for on the board games The closest thing to this according to the latest FIDE Laws of Chess is article 9.6: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five times. 9.6.2 any series of at least 75 moves have been made by each ...


5

Factually you ask two different things, "how" and "why", and maybe considering the "how" first makes things clearer. Obviously, the FIDE time control is recent. In early history of chess there was no time control at all, the problem with that should be obvious. I am old enough to have played 40 moves/2 hours + adjournment, thus ...


5

A bit late, but Miguel Ambrona recently developed an algorithm to assess whether a given position is a draw, or loss on timeout, under FIDE rules—in short, whether a checkmate is at all possible. https://github.com/miguel-ambrona/D3-Chess He wrote a complete version which finds the correct answer on all positions, at the cost of unpredictable computation ...


4

In a physical game, X and Y will normally just shake hands for the draw. However, if X insists on trying to "flag" Y, then Y can invoke the Quickplay Finish guidelines from the Laws of Chess (2018 edition), provided they are used in that tournament: III.1 A ‘quickplay finish’ is the phase of a game when all the remaining moves must be completed in ...


4

Because "that much longer" changes with the move count. You can't look at a 15+15 minute time control and say "why not make it an hour?" because scholar's mate exists, so you'd be overestimating, and the 50 move rule exists, so you'd be underestimating.


4

I think the following will happen at chess.com: If KNN runs out of time, KR wins. If KR runs out of time, it is a draw. If chess.com abides by the FIDE Laws of Chess then this is false. If the side with K+R runs out of time then they lose. K+R vs K+N will also lose. This is the relevant article: 6.9 Except where one of Articles 5.1.1, 5.1.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.2, ...


4

Exchange off all the pawns, and enough material to ensure that your opponent no longer has enough material to checkmate you (e.g. your opponent just has a king + bishop versus your king). Find a repetition of position and repeat it three times, e.g. a perpetual check, or a forcing sequence where your opponent can only break the sequence to their disadvantage....


3

Why does a football team lose when the clock runs out? Time is a key factor in playing chess. Else you would be back in the olde days when players could take days or weeks or longer before they moved. Even postal chess has time limits. Time limits is fair for both sides. If you played faster thereby not dominating you would not have won. Why should you be ...


3

Increments let you play endgames with time to think. Without them, the end of a game will usually be a time scramble.


3

Desperate to play 30 sec bullet in the chess.com app? Go to: More -> Watch -> Top games. If you're lucky you'll find some 30 sec games going on. If found, just click on it and wait for the game to end. A widget will then pop up showing stuffs related to the match. It will also have the button "New 30 sec". Yes! Click on that! Also, to play ...


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