53

I feel like you somewhat misunderstand the concept of a time control. The clock is a part of the game. If you are up a piece in a complicated position with five seconds left on the clock that may well be a losing position for you. Sure, the engine may show you +4, but the clock is an important part, especially in blitz. Importantly, if you spent all your ...


28

Draw with insufficient material is covered in article 9.6: The game is drawn when a position is reached from which a checkmate cannot occur by any possible series of legal moves, even with the most unskilled play. With a given material, it is possible to construct a checkmate (assuming your cooperation or horrible blunders), so it is not a draw.


28

As I commented, there are several reasons why people play fast, among them: One of the reasons I often see is fear of time trouble. Many amateurs are not really aware of whether the time they have left will "be enough", so start to move way too fast early on. They won't feel confident to play faster games either for that same reason. It could be the case ...


23

Worst-case scenario: Upgraded all your pawns to knights Your king is at Ka8 Your knights surround your king, so at Nb8, Na7 and Nb7 Opposition knight is at Nc7# - checkmate! So it is indeed possible to lose, thus not a draw.


23

Let's look at the title question from the perspective of engine chess, which is more objective in the sense that you can get two engines to play tens of thousands of games against each other at whatever time control you desire. If you look at the latest season of the unofficial world computer chess championship, you'll find that the strongest engine is ...


21

Play starts when the arbiter announces the start of play, usually by saying "Start white's clock". A good arbiter will then walk round the tournament room making sure that all clocks have been started. If both players have yet to arrive at a table then the arbiter will start white's clock. If a black player has not started white's clock then the ...


20

It is important to realize that chess is a zero-sum game*. In other words, everything that gives advantage to one player gives an equal disadvantage to the other player. So if adding 2 minutes to your opponent's clock benefits you, then it would be harmful to your opponent. It is not possible for any decision of the arbiter to give an advantage to your ...


18

Because not having it would result in some perverse incentives. In particular, in any game where a draw is an acceptable outcome, the optimal strategy without flag drops being losses would be to never make a move and simply wait for the flag. With any partial approach like you propose, the optimal strategy would instead be to try to force such a situation (...


17

I see it all the time on the net It also happens a lot over the board. There are two main reasons players play the moves very fast when they have a lot of time: They are in their preparation and the game may conclude (with a win or pre-arranged draw) before they leave their preparation. You often see this at the highest levels. They are sufficiently far ...


16

This is opinion based and therefore not a great fit for the Stack Exchange format, but here are my thoughts anyway. The lower the time limit, the more acceptable it is from a sportsmanship view. In standard long time controls, this is really poor form. In 1-minute ("bullet"), anything goes, including this. The reasoning is that in these really fast forms of ...


15

That indicates slightly more than just the time control: 6SS indicates a 6-round Swiss system tournament. 40/120 indicates that each side will have 120 minutes to make the first 40 moves of the game. sd30 indicates that after the first 40-move time control is met, each side will have an additional 30 minutes for the remainder of the game ("sd" = sudden ...


15

but that will not affect the game due to his/her hopeless position Well, if your opponent has a hopeless position, they would be better off accepting the 'automatic' draw offer which is implied whenever you make this request: "This constitutes the offer of a draw." Therefore, invoking this III.4 rule is only beneficial if you have a worse position and very ...


14

It depends. There are two likely sets of rules: FIDE (which governs international events) and USCF (which governs United States events.) These rules differ slightly. Under FIDE rules, the default time is 0 minutes unless otherwise indicated. This means that, rather than start the clock of a missing White player, Black could simply claim immediate victory if ...


12

I think the biggest reason is that using your time efficiently is an acquired skill just as learning tactics is. When you are not as strong, you do not know as much, and thus, you do not have as much to think about. As you acquire more overall chess skill, you have more to think about, and thus, you spend more time thinking. It is also a matter of practice. ...


12

Since you specifically asked for historical reasons: Think about your two proposed criteria in the context of the year 1800 or 1900. Using engine evaluation is obviously out of the question. So is "asking a better player", because you may often not have one at hand (physically, due to limited means of telecommunication!). Using material count is ...


11

The way ratings are mathematically defined, they don't express the absolute strength of players, but only the strength of players in a pool relative to each other. So there is no meaning in trying to compare blitz rating and standard rating, the way you are trying to suggest. For the same reason you cannot compare computer ratings with human ratings, ...


10

The FIDE-approved classical time control is: (taken from the handbook) 07 Time Control There is a single time control for all major FIDE events: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move starting from move one. This time control is used in many major chess events such as the ...


10

This question will receive more opinionated answers regarding the time control, I will answer in perspective of an advanced beginner Chess player. Since you have said you are a beginner and never played in a tournament before, I would suggest you to have 1 hour or 45mins + 45sec increment time control. This is because of my previous answer here: Do longer ...


9

The earliest Armageddon games I can find go back to the Women's World Chess Championship 2001, and the FIDE World Championship in 2002, which GM Ruslan Ponomariov won. This is probably a fairly complete list since Armageddon really only lends itself to knock-out tournaments or matches, and the question did ask primarily about GMs and Armageddon. There might ...


9

From FIDE Laws of Chess (2018 version): 6.9 Except where one of Articles 5.1.1, 5.1.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 applies, if a player does not complete the prescribed number of moves in the allotted time, the game is lost by that player. However, the game is drawn if the position is such that the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible ...


9

It's also a possible strategy to play with the opponent's mind by playing quick and ideal (or unexpected) moves, though it can be very risky and backfire. Depending on how mentally strong a player is, seeing a few quick and ideal moves done in a succession by the opponent may pressure their mind. If they cannot cope up with the pressure, a blunder may be ...


9

Except for exceptional circumstances, only three results are considered valid for a chess game (and the corresponding rating change): win, draw or loss. Your suggestion would come with a huge problem: what exactly counts as flagging? How big should your advantage have been for your opponent's victory to not count as a "real" victory? Who should ...


8

I am currently doing some research on the subject and hopefully can provide a more complete answer later, but apparently Capablanca did not invest much time. As he said (extracted from this compilation) about his tenth move: I thought for a little while before playing this, knowing that I would be subjected thereafter to a terrific attack, all the lines ...


8

Not only does lichess.org has the option to berserk in 1m bullet-games, but after a recent update you are able to to start a 30sec game. You will learn nothing though.


8

On Lichess there is a button that allows you to give 15 seconds to your opponent. You could use it to just give a bunch of extra minutes to your friend at the start of a game.


8

The clocks would start at 90 minutes, with 30 seconds added per move, starting at move one. When move 40 (not 20 - we're counting full moves, not half moves) is completed, 30 minutes would be added (along with the 30 seconds that's added for every move.) Events would ordinarily state what time control they are using. If it's not on the list of major ...


7

Yes. A grandmaster or a team of grandmasters can hold a draw or win against an engine when given time odds. I think that there is a minimum time control at which an engine can perform equally good or better than a grandmaster (without time odds). I guess this number is somewhere around 2 or 3 minutes for the whole game. Let's say for simplicity that it is ...


7

lichess gets it wrong. As it happens, White would lose all three games. With all white pieces still on the board, black has still "enough mating material" - it would actually help if White had no pieces at all! I guess we all agree in the following position black is checkmate: 5k1K/5n1P/8/8/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1 But this position can be reached from the ...


7

You don't have grounds to demand the time control you like. In practice I suppose that if your opponent agrees, you could get away with using whatever time control you both want as long as the game finishes on time, which is the main point the organizers care about. One thing that the USCF rules do cover is what to do if the stipulated time control has a ...


7

Interestingly there are two FIDE documents specifying these. Fortunately they don't contradict each other. First, FIDE Handbook - General Rules and Technical Recommendations for Tournaments / 07. Time Control / says: There is a single time control for all major FIDE events: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game ...


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