New answers tagged

4

There is no "official" definition because there's no ISO standard for chess terminology, so the term means whatever the author wants it to mean, but I'd say the essence of it is that it is a "safe" and "advanced" square for a piece, where "advanced" typically means at least the 5th rank. As an analogy consider common non-chess definitions of outpost such as "...


3

No, it does not have to be a knight. It is really any forward square (5th rank or 6th rank), occupied by any piece (knight, bishop, rook, and more rarely since it can be chased away by less-valuable pieces, but even a queen sometimes). The piece usually applies uncomfortable influence over the opponent’s position. For example, I have seen rooks planted ...


Top 50 recent answers are included