17

In chess, "opening theory" or just "theory" means "established opening lines": usually lines that have been studied and judged to lead to more or less equal positions, and appear in books. It's unfortunate terminology since it matches neither the day-to-day meaning of the word (something that's contrasted to practice) nor the ...


16

There is indeed such a word for so called "half-moves." The terminology used is the word ply. To speak of multiple ply, plies is used. One would refer to the move "e4" as the first ply of the game. An example demonstration of it can be seen at work in CSE's very own diagram viewer. Sometimes, a user wants to add a game to their post, but ...


16

A dead draw is a position in which no player has any chance of winning. Sometimes erroneously used in a position where theoretically someone could win but both players believe it is so basic and simple that neither will make a fatal mistake so the other player would win.


15

The word for one move by one player is "move". This is the term used in FIDE's laws of chess. The exception is when referring to the move counts in chess notation, where "move" commonly means one move by each player, and to disambiguate from that, the term "half-move" or "ply" is then used to clarify that only one move ...


15

There is no general rule in naming openings or opening lines in general or gambits. Sometimes it’s the inventor, sometimes the place they lived, they were born, they played the line the first time, and so on. To make it more complicated, openings can have different names in different languages. In German, the Petroff defence is named Russian defence, and ...


15

As a chess composer, seeing most problems being called puzzles is rather frustrating. A while ago, I personally revamped the problem and puzzles tags. The problem tag says: Chess problems consist of a board position and a task. Most ask for a line of play that mates black in a set amount of moves, or a combination that results in a winning position. Many ...


12

In the context of game theory, perfect play involves playing truly optimal moves. Specifically, if the game state is a (theoretical) win for the player to move, perfect play would be a move that both preserves that state (eg keeps the game a winning state) and minimizes the number of moves remaining until victory. If the game state is a draw, perfect play ...


11

Other than the algebraic nomenclature: Two off the top of my head are Correspondence chess used 1:1 to 8:8 to label the squares. Descriptive notation predated algebraic: 1. P-K4 P-K4 2. KN-B3 QN-B3 and so on.


10

I might not understand the Chinese idiom correctly, but to me it sounds like-- "Lose the battle but win the war" --which has the meaning of, it is better to sacrifice some small thing for the bigger picture (to me, that sounds like the crux of the Chinese idiom you shared).


9

The Swedish Variation of the Tarrasch Defense is the move 6...c4 in the line below. The name is also used for the same plan in slightly different positions with the same pawn structure. [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 {Tarrasch Defense} 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Nf3 Nc6 6.g3 c4 {Swedish Variation} Its ECO code is D33. Black tries to capitalize on his queenside ...


9

The short answer is no. In 25 years of chess experience I have never heard such a term. There isn't unless there is some definition somewhere in a shady club packed with sadists who love to mate with several knights!


9

In a winning position, the best move is the one with the shortest depth to mate. So, the “worst winning move” would be the one with maximal depth to mate. So it seems reasonable to call it the move with maximal depth to mate. However, there are two important caveats: If you repeatedly play these kinds of moves, then your depth to mate may increase, rather ...


9

A "dead draw" position is an endgame neither side can make further progress. It's not an immediate forced draw, meaning that the "stronger" side does not have to play a line that leads to stalemate or insufficient material, three-fold repetition or anything like that. However, all attempts they have to win can be stopped with an accurate ...


9

tl;dr: Chess problems must meet defined quality standards. Chess puzzles need not. (Disclosure: I am a chess problemist.) Chess problems are all subject to rigorous conventions that are not that widely known, even among experienced chess players. Off the top of my head, the most important are: There must be a unique solution. For example, in a mate in 4 (...


8

Depends- there's no real rule outside of "convention" and when a name's settled on by the community at large, it tends to stay that way (as openings in general). Often, it'll be named after a person who played it a lot, developed the theory, a country related to it by the nationality of one or more people that played/developed it (or otherwise ...


7

The Oxford Companion to Chess says that the Noa Variation of the Nimzo-Indian was played regularly by Josef Noa, but that he reached the position after 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Qc2 Nf6.


7

As the other answers indicate, gambits - and openings in general - can receive their names from different factors. A few examples: The King's Gambit gets its name from opening with the king's pawn and gambiting the immediately adjacent flank pawn. The Queen's Gambit is similarly named, except the gambit is on the queen's side of the board. Although the ...


7

It is called a clearance sacrifice: In a clearance sacrifice, the sacrificing player aims to vacate the square the sacrificed piece stood on, either to open up lines for his own pieces, or to put another, more useful piece on the same square.


6

Time is money. It’s an idiom not typically used in the context of chess, but I think the meaning would be clear in context to a native English speaker. You’re losing “money” (a piece) in order to gain “time” (a tempo). You expect to gain an advantage because the latter is more valuable. In more formal economics lingo, there’s opportunity cost. For example,...


6

I am not aware of an idiomatic way of saying it. However, I would express it as "seizing the moment". For example, there is a book by Ivan Sokolov, "Sacrifice and Initiative in Chess: Seize the Moment to Get the Advantage," which I think talks exactly about the importance of the initiative vs material that you mean in your question.


6

Stockholm variation of the Grunfeld [FEN ""] 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bg5 With immediate threat of Bxf6 and wins the d5 pawn


6

Older players such as myself (I'm 83) learned with descriptive notation. Descriptive notation names the files based upon the piece standing originally on the 1st rank square, e.g. the QB file for what is the "c" file in Algebraic and the Q file for the Algebraic "d" file. I preferred it to Algebraic, which became popular later on, since ...


6

Sense of Humor There are several real but somewhat silly openings that gets its name. Sodium Attack (1. Na3), Ammonia opening (1, Nh3), Meadow Hay Gambit (1. a4 e5 2. Ra3 Bxa3), Picklepuss Defence (1. e4 h5 2. d4 Nf6). No one will actually play these in tournaments or something, they serves no useful purpose (except maybe training), but they're funny. ...


6

Not worth it. Tactic used by low rated players which might work against other low rated players but would fail to a halfway decent player. Run the position through an engine of your choice and see what it says. No official name but patzer fish rookie beginner could work. Can not comment. @David Bateman: If those ratings are online then they are barely ...


6

It definitely prevents Black from playing ...c5, at least temporarely. I wouldn't say Black pawns are "fixed" though. Anyway, isn't Re7 a much stronger move?


6

Does “juicer” mean bishop? This YouTube video of Hikaru playing the Beth Harmon bot gives some clues. First, at 3:06 he says "I think I can just throw in a juicer check" and indicates a bishop check with arrows on the board. This suggests that juicer does mean bishop for him. However at 3:33 he says "I don't understand. I'm just up a juicer, ...


6

What is a chess problem? The wikipedia definition is pretty good: A chess problem, also called a chess composition, is a puzzle set by the composer using chess pieces on a chess board, which presents the solver with a particular task. In constrast, problemists use the term “tactical puzzle" to describe the kinds of realistic positional chess ...


6

Your terms have been defined by GM Bien in his book https://b-ok.cc/book/869069/2e0f8a or https://archive.org/details/chessrecipesfromthegrandmasterskitchen. However, although mobility is a factor in many engines, it's no calculated by the method you're trying to accomplish. Common features checked with an evaluation function are pawn structures, isolated, ...


5

Yes, that's a "square". The word "cell" is never used. E.g. from the Wikipedia article: Chess is a two-player strategy board game played on a checkered board with 64 squares arranged in an 8×8 grid. The 64 squares alternate in color and are referred to as light and dark squares. Or, if you prefer a dictionary: 3 : any of the quadrilateral spaces ...


5

Excellent question. Translation is always a tricky business. There isn't an established chess saying, although Patrick McElhaney's answer "Time is money" comes closest in meaning, and is an idiom in English. So I would simply invent another phrase with the same meaning, if you want to convey the idea and keep the catchiness that it has in Mandarin. I ...


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