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12

Officially most of it depends on the team competition, it will have regulations. But I think these questions will have pretty much the same answers everywhere. Yes, you're sitting right next to them, and you can walk around as usual, so you can see their boards. Usually teams have a team leader also, whose role is to advise you about offering or accepting ...


9

Just from my experience playing in a lowly ECF English county league: Does not seem to be a problem. No problem - just check with your captain that he got your score and ask if he wants you to do anything else (perhaps he needs help with cleaning up the venue or such). Does not seem to be a problem in the county leagues, but I believe FIDE is now quite ...


5

In a low contest regional type tournament, I'm assuming you don't have to abide by FIDE or USCF rules. Given this, I would suggest the following: Warn them the first time you see this happening. Say that the next time you see this anytime in the rest of the tournament, their team loses whatever current match they're playing. So not only does one player lose ...


5

Well, in short, nothing. This (a tactical lineup) is actually quite common in team matches. There are basically two problems, the second of which is not a problem in the Olympiad because of the fixed board order. Chess isn't an exact science; a weaker player can beat a stronger player (the odds that this happens are just lower). Given the ratings, you can ...


5

There are two levels of team captain powers, official powers / rights and powers that his/her national federation confers. Examples of these would be that a team player may ask his team captain if he may accept a draw offer. The captain's advice is non-binding. This is an official power. Normally players are not allowed to discuss their games with anybody ...


5

How about this benefit? It is probably well known that Magnus Carlsen is sponsored by Arctic Securities. Being well known is the benefit. One minute ago I had not even heard about arctic securities. And now I know, as well as may be thousand of other people watching/reading about the game. Why Vodaphone or whatever is sponsoring football? Do they care, ...


5

A lot of questions with many different answers depending on the type of competition. Leagues can be either Swiss or round robin. I suspect most leagues are round robins but by no means all are. Perhaps the most interesting league from the viewpoint of pairings is the the UK's 4NCL (originally 4 Nations Chess League). There 4 main divisions with subdivisions ...


3

The tie-break rules are listed on the FIDE website, D.II.02 paragraph G.14: The position of teams that finish with the same number of match points shall be determined by application of the following tie-breaking procedures in sequence ... (a) the sum of Sonneborn-Berger points, which are calculated as follows: match points of each opponent, ...


3

My answer is based on my experience with the Dutch competition, both for chess and (where relevant) other sports. Is it deterministic once team gets its starting number? If for example two teams must play in early rounds (e.g. A, B from same club), is it always done by giving them appropriate starting numbers or are some leagues where rounds are done ...


3

This is, quite obviously, cheating. I'm going to assume that the teammate isn't asking for help, and the guy is just blurting it out. (Otherwise a forfeit would be a given.) But even if the teammate doesn't want the advice and is doing nothing wrong, it's still extremely unfair to his opponent. According to the FIDE Anti-Cheating Guidelines: In a Team ...


2

Assuming that the player in the ongoing game did nothing wrong (did not speak to team members about the game) and a spectator team mate just shouts a move, there is unfortunately not much you can do in the moment, apart from removing the spectator from the room. The player did nothing wrong, and you are only the arbiter of the current match, not of the whole ...


1

If I understand the question correctly, you would have to do a swiss style pairing and play by teams. The way our high school leagues organize the chess meets and tournaments is by high school with teams of 8 people (but this can be changed for your convenience of course). The players are put in an order of rank or their skill which determines their board ...


1

I think the standard way to treat a team tournament is like a normal tournament, only with teams instead of players. So there is swiss system pairing if there are too many teams for a round robin. A win gives you 1 point, a draw 1/2 and a loss 0. Sometimes that 2 points for a win, 1 for a draw and 0 for a loss, but that's equivalent. The number of board ...


1

Yes there is a chess league in the US, but it does not have the sponsorship you see in Europe. Check the USCF website, and this more specific site http://uschessleague.com/


1

I doubt there is any existing theory for four player chess, because it is not widely played or analyzed. I'm not sure if there even exists any serious investigation of the overall strategy or tactics of this variant, as it is mostly a novelty game played casually. It's pointless to analyze openings when even the basic strategies of a game are largely ...


1

My own experience (from high school, decades ago), is that balanced teams do better. That's because most opposing teams are unbalanced. I was first board on my team, and "league average" against other first boards. But my lower boards were barely worse than me. They "cleaned up" against their counterparts, few of whom were "barely" weaker than me. ...


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