14

The easiest way depends on age. If they are really young, just start simple with how a plain board and introduce the pieces one by one (where they go on the board and how they move). Then put all the pieces on the board and show how the pieces move together. If they are a little older, I would play show them short games with tactical ideas and mating ...


14

It is taught together with the rest of the rules of the game. You playing for years without knowing about it has nothing to do with that, either you learn the rules or you don't, you won't self-discover them no matter how many years you play, specially not when your playing pool is limited solely to your friends who may not know certain rules either. So you ...


12

Does it make most sense to just start playing with setting up all the pieces, or are there smaller "games" that one can/should start with? It doesn't really matter the age of the person learning to play, there is no point in starting with a full set. There is just far too much to take in and make sense of. The first thing to do is to teach them how to win!...


11

There are some fundamental differences between adults and children. Namely, the attention span to focus on a long game of chess might not be there. There are also some psychological differences: An adult (most likely) already knows what it means to win and lose, where children may not have grasped that concept yet. Adults also probably can grasp the concept ...


11

Bill Kilpatrick and I wrote a book, which was recently published called, Chess Is Child's Play: Teaching Techniques That Work. This book teaches a parent to teach a child as young as four to play chess. We made the lessons super simple, allowing the parent to learn the game along with their child, if the parent isn't familiar with chess. We employ a “mini-...


11

In my experience it is likely that kids get interested in whatever you are interested in. So, play a couple of chess games with a friend or set up some chess problems and work on them yourself at a time where your kid can see what you are doing. It is quite likely that your kid will start asking questions what you are doing and wants to play as well. ...


11

I tend to disagree with the other answers that suggest starting with just a few pieces. Kids absorb so much, so quickly. When my daughter was 4, she used to just watch me so she got some familiarity with the shapes of the pieces, but there was no teaching at this time. When she was 5, I taught her the names of the pieces, and then how they all moved. I did ...


9

This problem does vanish with time, but it takes longer depending on the person... Personally when I teach others about the knight movement I explain it with the "L" letter. If they draw the letter L horizontally and vertically they will get all the squares he can go to. This is in my opinion simpler to understand as they will be using a letter they already ...


9

Many old endgame books are like encyclopedias, they have sections about one type of endgame and then a lot of analysis about all the various situations one might encounter in that endgame. I find those boring and very hard to remember. Let's forget about those. I can think of three things to mention that might be helpful: Jeremy Silman's endgame book is ...


8

Have you tried lichess studies ? They can be used exactly like that. Let me give you an overview of how it works. First you need to create a study, which you can do by heading to https://lichess.org/study/ and clicking in the green plus button. Multiple Members As the What are Studies page explains, you can invite people to your study: Let me quote the ...


7

My 5 cents to Wes' answer. I disagree about understanding of "turn-based game". From my experience it's easily possible. I agreed about duration of game. Long game will be broken! About win / lost, all children understand this, then tend to win of course and don't like to lost, tested :)! Children are small people. As adult they like playing. I think ...


7

1) Unwarranted resignations happen on occasion even in tournament play, sometimes even in a won position. If your student does this in an instructional game, it's a teachable moment. In the present game, you might learn too: saying "haha, now I get a free rook" during the game is distracting the opponent, which is against the rules whether or not you in ...


6

What are the advantages of teaching chess at schools? That depends. If you like chess, the advantage of having chess classes for free from good teachers (assuming they are good) is that you play your favourite game / learn something you like / have people to play with / all of this is free. It is really good for average chess players (who will be able to ...


6

The rule I teach kids which seems to work is that the knight can go to the closest squares the queen can't go to.


6

Teach him by showing example positions that you can play out against each other. There is a big difference between being told that two rooks are often stronger than a queen and really experiencing the power of the two rooks. You could maybe play out a position from the Kramnik-Leko match 2004.


6

I'd explain nothing about openings to a 6 year old, except maybe something about using all your pieces (but it'll fall to deaf ears, most likely). I assisted at a local school tournament recently, where players of about seven had a lot of trouble playing legal moves, or checkmating their opponent when being up almost everything. Checkmate is often not ...


6

If you're question is: What job can I get if I put "strong chess player" on my CV, the answer is probably nothing. Although a difficult game to master, the skills you acquire with chess has very little resemblance to the skills prospective employers are looking for. Employers value real world experience in their domain - they are not usually too interested ...


5

The Benefits of Chess in Education Take a look at The Benefits of Chess in Education (original link) from the Kasparov Foundation, which gives a detailed overview about the benefits of teaching children to play chess. The document describes among other things the following points: Academic benefits Focusing: Children learn to concentrate, because they ...


5

Maybe starting with endgame theory is the wrong approach. Learning stuff by heart and then reproducing it isn't much fun for most people. To productively study theoretical positions you ideally already have the interest and motivation to do so. So I would recommend to start with two other aspects of endgames: Endgame tactics: If he likes the middle game, ...


5

When coaching young kids, I have found that they love doing the simple checkmates (King and Queen v. King, etc.). They like beating the coach. There are some good books out there as well that are written at the kids level, but I even use some so called "adult" books that start at the beginning.


5

Searching for Bobby Fisher maybe. Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8khmNiamBxo http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108065/


5

[Corrected: most of the alternative solutions I suggested fail to g4+] There must be some mistake in the diagram, because R(either)xR+ is a non-quiet move that forces mate in 2. Quiet moves don't work because of the defense Rc8+ or Rxh8. Except that the FEN indicates that the wP is on g2, not b7 as it seems, and that makes Qa8! a quiet solution (Zugzwang: ...


4

My little brother learned chess with a video game called "Learn To Play Chess With Fritz and Chesster" (OT "Fritz und Fertig"). It teaches kids the basic moves of the pieces with mini-games, moving on to games with only some pieces, and finally with all of them. The sequels go more in-depth into basic, and then more advanced strategies. He went from not ...


4

Start by playing with only pawns on the board. First person to the opposite side of the board wins the game. This was Magnus Carlsen's training method used by his father when he started to learn chess. It's much simpler for a child to understand this, and it's a highly effective method to learn about sacrifices, pawn structures and zugzwang. My experience ...


4

I learned to play chess when I was 3. My biggest challenge was learning the starting positions of the pieces, and I also remember mixing up the bishop and Queen because of the shape of the point. At that age, I wouldn't think language acquisition would be a big challenge, as I've known kids of that age (2-5) to pick languages up faster than teenagers. You'...


4

The following study holds that chess in schools helps students with low-level gains in intelligence, but no high level gains. In other words, if I'm correct in my memory of the study it can teach "life lessons" like sports, but with no gains in intelligence versus sports. So, knowledge of the game would only lead to knowledge in the overlap of fields. Of ...


4

I also use the "L shaped method (facing either frontwards or backwards) to explain the move to my students and show them all 8 squares that it could move to in one step on an open board, emphasizing that it is the only piece that can jump over another. I think this visual method is easier to understand than counting. Any problem with this will vanish with ...


4

The approach I use (also with older kids) is that the process of mating involves putting the king in jail and making the walls smaller and smaller ... For something like smothered mate it is the pieces on the king's own side which build the walls! But when there is not much material left on the board you have to build the walls with your pieces. You can ...


4

Quite frankly it's because most people don't care enough about chess to grasp the motivation behind the rule, so, because it comes into play so rarely, they forget the rule even exists. I would bet that at least half of the players at my local library's chess club (which is a very casual club) couldn't tell me what a passed pawn is or why it's important. It ...


4

I have a few. Chess Kid is part of chess.com, which is the largest chess site in the world. There are both free and paid memberships. Another great site is ChessKids Academy. They have come very basic lessons for newcomers, and the best thing is that it is free. Kid Chess also has some nice material that is free. All of these sites have components for ...


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