8

The information is hidden away in Standards of Chess Equipment and tournament venue for FIDE Tournaments section 13.4. 13.4. Buchholz System 13.4.1. The Buchholz System is the sum of the scores of each of the opponents of a player. 13.4.2. The Median Buchholz is the Buchholz reduced by the highest and the lowest scores of the opponents. 13.4.3. The ...


8

The current algorithms are deterministic. I have no idea why you would want a non-deterministic algorithm. The advantage of the deterministic ones we currently use is that they can be easily done by hand (and were done by hand until quite recently), so if a TD changes them manually that can be detected. Gender of the players is not an input to the algorithm ...


4

is there any good and free software available for setting up swiss tournaments? All of those I've tried have very few options and little functionality available. Vega is a swiss pairing program which has been approved by FIDE. It is free if you install it on Linux and if you install it on Windows it is free up to 30 players in the tournament. It is a ...


4

It says the exact opposite. C.04.2 A It is not allowed to alter the correct pairings in favour of any player. So no, you can't. Where it can be shown that modifications of the original pairings were made to help a player achieve a norm or a direct title, a report may be submitted to the QC to initiate disciplinary measures through the Ethics ...


3

One sure-fire way is for you to buy your own copy of Swiss Manager, the pairing software used in this particular case, and reproduce the tournament and then do the next round pairing once all the results are in. The light version of Swiss Manager, which you could use since there are fewer than 60 players, costs 75 euros. Alternatively you could try and do ...


3

There is a tradeoff between making the pairings that "should" be made according to the strict pairing rules, and attempting to prevent collusion. Imagine this scenario: Russia 1: 8.5 Russia 2: 8 India: 8 Peru: 7.5 Which is more unfair: to have Russia 1 play Russia 2 and have a possible prearranged result, or to prevent Russia 1 and Russia 2 from ...


3

Surely we can create opt out for gender pairings which occur consecutively? Yes, we could. We can make whatever rules we like, after all. But I don't think we should. Such a rule would have to come at the expense of some other pairing rule. We currently have rules that players cannot play each other twice, that players with equal scores should play ...


2

Swiss system has nothing to do with time controls. It is a tournament pairing system based on the principle that in each round players with so far similar results are paired together, and that each player has approximately as many games with white and black. Details can be found in wikipedia.


2

Is there an option in the pairing program to set this? Of course. Different approved Swiss pairing programs will do this is different ways. You should check out the User Manuals for the different programs to see how this is done. For instance, in the Vega program go to the File menu, Round Manager, Avoid Pairs option and you can specify groups of players ...


2

In the first round, it should go to the player with the lowest initial ranking. After that, it depends, but it would ordinarily go to a low ranked player in the lowest score group. According to rule A.2: For pairings purposes only, the players are ranked in order of, respectively (a) score (b) pairing numbers assigned to the players accordingly to ...


2

Note:   Independently from the route followed, the assignment of the pairing-allocated bye (see C.2) is part of the pairing of the last bracket. https://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=170&view=article In simple terms, this means that the bye normally goes to one of the players currently tied for last place, but there may be complications if ...


1

There's a Python library called PyPair, that allows to easily generate the pairings, a short example: Players = { 1:"Tim", 2:"Jeff", 3:"Kristi", 4:"Jacob", 5:"Doug", 6:"Karen", 7:"David"} to = Tournament() for player in Players: to.addPlayer( player, Players[player] ) pairings1 = ...


1

The difference is in the scale of the tournament / match you need to handle. If you plan a tournament with maximum of 60 participants and 11 rounds (or a team championship up to 6 teams), the light version is enough. If you plan to grow big, then choose the full version. You can read this on the official site (last paragraph).


1

Just use the "Berger" Pairings/Tables. If there are an odd number of players, then a "dummy" player is added. When creating the pairings each round, whoever is playing the "dummy" player is simply receiving a bye. Then you run it again with colors reversed. If your program has no major issues, you should be able to manually enter people into your program, ...


1

What would be a minimum set of parameters that needs to be specified in order to avoid ambiguity in pairings? The minimum would be to have just one rule. Do your first round pairings by sorting players according to their ID number... and then, in the second round, do it again. If you don't have any rules about repeating colors, scores, or meeting the same ...


1

Is this question prompted by Hou Yifan's unfortunate experience at Gibchess this year? The point for her was she was expecting to be paired with less women and 7 out of 9 pairings was rather high. However the pairing rules made no provision for her gender and have a small but finite probability that this would happen. How can you make pairings gender ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible