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1

I don't know of any statistics to prove either way, but I think this is not true. I've seen just as many new players plod along with a passive pawn march as I've seen be very aggressive. New players may seem aggressive since they often trade immediately rather than leave pieces in threat, and in taking these trades they leave themselves (unknowingly) in ...


4

I think the under-looked consideration here is that you play blitz. Blitz (especially when no increment or delay is used) is much more conducive to aggressive playstyles than quiet ones. If Alice makes an aggressive attack against Bob, one of two things happens. Either Alice's attack is successful and she generally wins on the spot, or the attack fails and ...


7

In my view, most club players don't play aggressively enough. There is a pattern where someone who is good against non-club players joins a chess club, plays their first matches, tries wild attacks, that are easily defended against. New player drops a couple of pawns, the club player exchanges off to an endgame and wins by promoting one of them. Many new ...


12

Do most amateur players play aggressively? That's a very broad and sweeping generalization because, for a start, the vast majority of chess players are amateurs. Very, very few are professionals. Very, very few can actually make a living from chess by playing, coaching or teaching. Not even all grandmasters can make a living from chess. Then there is the ...


7

Do you know the German biologist Ernst Haeckel? "Ontogenesis recapitulates phylogenesis". I think this is as true in chess. History of chess, as well as development of an individual chess player, begins with tactics. Positional play only comes later (and would be rather pointless without some tactical knowledge). Exceptions are rare. (In my own ...


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