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26

However, if black takes with Rook, then Knight takes' white's rook, white rook to take knight, then black rook to take white rook. This prevents the Qe8 mate, doesn't it? No, it accelerates it. Let's look at what happens if black takes with the knight instead of the rook [fen "1r1r2k1/6pp/2n4q/2p1p2Q/pp2N2P/5P2/PPPR2P1/1K1R4 w - - 0 1"] 1. Rxd8 ...


25

Stockfish isn't a perfect chess-playing entity, and you've found a position where it's unable to tell is a draw (at least until the 50 move rule kicks in and helps it prune). These positions are called "fortresses". You can tell this is happening because even if you input the solution, Stockfish still evaluates the final position as -10 or more. These ...


18

Generally speaking, the side with the most pawns will win. The tempo provided by the extra pawn is usually enough to gain opposition and access to the key squares. Doubled pawns don't matter for this, unless they're blocked. The extra pawn can also limit the movement of the opponent's king, resulting in the possibility of a triangulation maneuver. Another ...


17

The objective is not to eliminate the rooks. The objective is to remove black's defense of the e8 square so that Qe8# can be played. After Nxd8, does black still control e8?


16

In reading your question, I can't help but think you aren't asking your real question, which I read as, "When I'm out of my book I get abused. How do I stop this from happening?" I'm assuming that, like me, you're a USCF player rated under 1800. I offer the following advice: Learn two openings with White and two with Black. Choose white openings begin ...


15

While there are general rules, these rules have many exceptions and nuances. In the following position with White to move, both sides have a passed pawn, but the fact that Black's passed pawn is so much better means White is dead lost: [FEN "6k1/8/6p1/2p5/1pPpP3/pP6/2P3P1/2K5 w - - 0 1"] But it's precarious. Remove Black's A-pawn from the starting ...


15

20 years old is not that late to start. Any amount of time spent can help improve or maintain skills. Consider how much time you would like to spend and commit to it. Adjust to ensure you are enjoying your chess time. Easy to improve when having fun. An hour a day is fine to start. How you spend you time is also important. There is much good advice on ...


14

In my experience it is likely that kids get interested in whatever you are interested in. So, play a couple of chess games with a friend or set up some chess problems and work on them yourself at a time where your kid can see what you are doing. It is quite likely that your kid will start asking questions what you are doing and wants to play as well. ...


14

I don't know which person you are referring to, or if the exact word "coach" was used, but GMs like Carlsen don't really have coaches in the sense you are probably thinking of; they have seconds, who have the following functions: Opening research. This might mean performing general research, or looking for particular weapons that are likely to be useful ...


14

There is a lot of argument over the 10,000 hour rule, which is said to be the amount of practice required to attain mastery of a skill. With today's tools, learning can be accelerated quite a bit. But even if we knock it down to 3000 hours it would take you nearly a decade at 1 hour a day. You say you love the game, so I say just go for it at an hour a ...


13

Coaches at that level are analysers rather than teachers. They prepare openings for a specific opponent, investigate opponent's weakness, help to analyse games during tournament after each round to find mistakes, perform official things such as registering, following results, mental encouragement ... High chess rating and practical abilities don't mean ...


11

I'd like to start with this comment of yours: "I fear that without this abusive online playing my abilities OTB will be damaged." I know where you are coming from, because I've been there, too. I used to be ridiculously addicted to chess - and I wasn't even very good lol. Now it's a hobby, which is much more healthy. I also know that fear you ...


11

It helps to understand that engines don't really go off of "strategy", so much as they look several moves into the future, evaluate the score of the position, and find the optimal move set. The great weakness of that approach is that if nothing can happen quickly, the engine's going to have problems. This used to be a huge problem with endgames. If you've ...


11

There are a variety of reasons: Regardless of when they were played, there is always a lot to learn in analyzing better players's games. Players from a century ago often used simpler strategical themes that are easier to understand and apply. Opening theory was not that well developed back then, so the "actual game" starts earlier on. You also wouldn't find ...


10

Write your opening down somewhere . Read it every day. Play it against real opponents / engine. Analyse your opening games, did you move the wrong piece? Try to figure out the plans of the opening. For example in c5 sicilian, one plan might be playing d5 if white played f3, because f3 is really weak after the trade-off on d5. Just play nearly every variation ...


10

Here is an outrageous mate in 57 puzzle which none of the top 3 engines are able to solve: [fen "8/6pp/5p2/k7/3p4/1Q2p3/3prpp1/3Kbqrb w - - 0 1"] 1.Qc4 Kb6 2.Qd5 h6 3.Qc4 Ka5 4.Qb3 h5 5.Qc4 Kb6 6.Qd5 h4 7.Qc4 Ka5 8.Qb3 h3 9.Qc4 Kb6 10.Qd5 h2 11.Qc4 Ka5 12.Qb3 g6 13.Qc4 Kb6 14.Qd5 g5 15.Qc4 Ka5 16.Qb3 f5 17.Qc4 Kb6 18.Qb4+ Kc6 19.Qa5 f4 20.Qe5 g4 21.Qf5 Kd6 ...


8

There are a number of ways to study, the most efficient route isn't always the one most people can commit to though. It's best to do something you can sustain consistently for a long time. Generally chess study can be broken up into sub categories. You can solve puzzles. Generally tactics puzzles are best since they have an easy to understand answer, ...


7

There are two paths you can choose and they both depend on the current pawn structure you play. You see, I understand exactly what you face here, as I have the same problem. When you work or have other reasons not to devote yourself to studying chess, you need to learn the least amount of openings possible in order to focus on more important stuff such as ...


7

The first paragraph of the RESULTS section on p. 155 says We applied log-10 transformations to three variables (cumulative study alone, cumulative tournament play, and chess book library size) prior to correlation and regression analyses. The log-10 (logarithm base 10) of a number is what power you have to raise 10 to in order to produce that number; e.g....


7

I feel that this is a troll post due to the language. I can say this immediately. The rating system that you are using is not a USCF or FIDE rated system with over the board play and/or you have a provisional rating and have not played a proper amount of game to accurately gauge your strength. It is possible to obtain almost a Class A strength in that time ...


7

Indeed such studies do exist, similar to the fortresses you speak of. In my experience timely underpromotions seem to be the Achilles' heel of most current engines, and I remember at least one example that I'll show in the annotated diagram below. It's a beautiful endgame study, with white to win (I strongly recommend trying it on your own before you see ...


7

Anything is possible. The real question is how likely are you and most people to do it that way. And it depends on what you call 'theory'. I read NO theory. But I read a lot of practical books on openings, tactics, end games, pawn structure, positional play, yada yada. They claim that an AI program learned to play Go by playing itself. I do not know ...


6

Studying Opening Chess theory is definitively not about memorizing long lines of theory where you'll get lost if you opponent diverges... Also what to do next once you're out of your book? The best way is....to practice! In a nutshell: Study Few GMs or important games for that opening and/or system you would like to play: you'll get a general feeling of ...


6

First, let's look at the origin of the term "study". In art, a study is a drawing, sketch or painting done in preparation for a finished piece, or as visual notes. Studies are often used to understand the problems involved in rendering subjects and to plan the elements to be used in finished works, such as light, color, form, perspective and ...


6

There is no general rule for multi-pawn endgames as they are much too complex. However I believe that most of the pawn only endgames that appear in regular games are readily assessed correctly by grandmasters (or even just masters). Sure there are pawn endgame studies that might be tricky, but on average assessing a pawn endgame is much easier than an ...


6

Personally, I think that you have a very solid plan. When I was up-and-coming, I would study a lot every day, but I would only play about two tournaments a year. Up to a certain point, I would pick up about 200 rating points per tournament in the beginning, and later about 100. Of course, as I got over 2000, that slowed down some. Back then, we did not have ...


6

I looked at my library, and opened up a number of books. The old Dvoretsky books really do not do this much, but the "School of Future Champions" and "School of Chess Excellence" series do have many sections that just say "white (or black) to play", and nothing more. Other Dvoretsky books that do that significantly are "Recognizing Your Opponent's Resources"...


6

A lot of endgame work is dry, and there is no getting around that. I learned endgames long before those books were available, and although it was a lot of work, I loved Ruben Fine's "Basic Chess Endings". In it, there would be a base example, but then often, many other similar examples. By going through it, I saw multiple examples that were similar, thus ...


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