New answers tagged

-2

Position counts just as much as material. Often more. Like Brian Towers said you played a patzer. Play some good players and learn to appreciate position more than material if you want to improve.


5

on move 22 Stockfish 12 gives me +7 at depth 22 being only one pawn up even though black's pieces are out Black's pieces are not all out and the ones that are aren't on the right squares. Black is still several moves away from being able to castle safely. Meanwhile you have completed development, including the queenside castling safety move Kb2, and some of ...


-1

Wrong answer: "Depth 10 means the algorithm checked all moves in 10 node distance." Right answer: "It doesn't mean it looked at all the moves possible to that extent thought, it trims what it analises, otherwise it would be unable to reach such depths, this means a mate in 10 for example may only be found when stockfish searches in greater ...


6

[1] Your understanding is correct, with one slight adjustment. Instead of thinking about it as "King on a1, Pawn on a2", you should think of it as two things: "King on a1, Friendly Pawn on a2", and "King on a1, Enemy Pawn on a2". The input layer knows the colors of the pieces. Note that I do not say White/Black, but Friendly/...


1

There are many elements that a computer looks at to determine how the computer plays. A more defensive computer would place more value on the pawns around the king. A more attacking computer would place more value on retaining pieces, to maintain the attacking possibilities. The choice of opening and the central pawn structure affects the overall playing ...


12

Besides Mike Jones' correct positional explanation, Black is also losing material at once after the simple 8.Ndb5. White attacks the d6 pawn, whose capture would also deprive Black of castling rights. 9.Nd5 followed by a fork on c7 is an even bigger threat ensuring that there is no defense: 8...Bf8 9.Nd5 Rb8 (what else ?) 10.Nbc7 Kd7 is awful, when the ...


12

This move creates several weaknesses, at f6, d5, and d6, and restricts the movement of the Bg7. The outpost weakness is usually shown by the game https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1257953. The d6 weakness is basically using all you pieces to attack the pawn and, once all of black's pieces on defending it, to shift the attack to another point and, ...


1

I am rated 1410 USCF. I played all 8 Stockfish levels this past weekend, once with each color. My record was 11-5. I was 2-0 vs Stockfish 1-5, 1-1 vs Stockfish 6, and 0-2 vs Stockfish 7 and 8.


1

I kept misreading the question and thought you asked why black was pinning, but now I understand better. I, and most high-ranked players, would accept the doubled pawns to get a pawns on e5. This would provide a decent kingside attack, which would be better if you still had your light square bishop (LSB). I do understand that your dark square bishop (DSB) ...


2

In this particular position, it's not so much that the pin is anything special; there simply aren't many squares where you can put your bishop that don't let your opponent double your pawns. The only other option would be Bxd6, which gives your opponent the pleasant choice of either developing their queen for free with Qxd6 or opting for controlling some ...


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