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18

9.dxc5? is a horrible positional blunder. The Grunfeld for black allows white a big center, and his idea is to chip away at it, or force it to advance, and then chip away at it. That center controls a lot of nice squares, and is very desirable. 9.dxc5? by white voluntarily does what black is trying to achieve in a very bad way, and worse, it turns the Bg7 ...


16

Taking a look at the comments in your link, I came across a post quoting GM Edmar Mednis: A move which was invariably given two exclamation marks - 14.Nb1!! after the game. May I respectfully suggest that if Spassky had proceeded to lose this game it would have read 14.Nb1?? If we look at the nature of the position, it should be apparent that ...


11

There is no real definite answer for this question. Many people have floated different theories, most of which borrow bits and pieces from each other. It is quite possible that his mental struggles just got the best of him or that he lost interest after attaining the summit of the game. Psychologically, it must have been hard to cope when you get the ...


9

King's Gambit is not really a horrible opening. Just after all the theory that has been amassed since Spassky has shown that it loses white's advantage. There are other openings that create a good amount of initiative without the possibility of falling into a losing position.


9

The King's Gambit has been "refuted" at several points in the past. Most have later been proven incorrect, IIRC only two lines at this point seem suspect. But that's not the point. The point is: how many of your opponents know enough about those lines to play them as accurately as required to win? (John Shaw in his book on the KG noted analyzing one of the ...


8

it's actually impossible to keep the material advantage since after 9.dxc5 black has the move 9...Qa5 which puts a second attacker to the c3 pawn and also prepares to recapture the c5 pawn. All that white would be doing is giving up the strong center which is a huge deal in this line of the Grunfeld. Black, on the other hand, would be left with a more active ...


7

Spassky had an entire squad of Soviet grandmasters trying to find holes in Fischer's repertoire. So it made a lot of sense to surprise them. He also avoided the sharp King's Indian and went for the Nimzo instead. There are other examples for this strategy. Peter Leko, a 1.e4 player, switched to 1.d4 for his match against Kramnik. Changing the black ...


7

He had mental problems. But he is still one of the greatest chess players of all time. Joseph Ponterotto has even written a book about Fischer's mental problems - A Psychobiography of Bobby Fischer Ponterotto believes the evidence is strongest for paranoid personality disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by unrelenting paranoia and ...


6

Spassky did not play it "often" and you'll notice he also didn't play it in any of his 3 world championship matches. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessplayer?pid=21136 Black can very quickly equalize, for example 2...Bc5 or 2...exf4 3.Nf3 d5. Among many others. Black can also try to maintain his opening advantage with lines like 3.Nf3 d6, among others. In ...


5

I'd actually argue that the drawbacks of g3 are worse than Black getting a knight on f4. White permanently weakens the kingside light squares and blocks in his dark-squared bishop. Meanwhile, Black getting a knight on f4 is a bit unpleasant, but it's not necessarily a permanent problem. Spassky probably thought that after 26...Nf4 27.Qc2, he was holding. ...


5

No two people are alike, and no two chess players are alike either. To begin with, world class grandmasters study chess all the time, and they can play just about every opening under the sun and score incredibly well. However, in order to get the very best results possible, most grandmasters will study and memorize moves and plans for a handful of ...


4

Fischer declared in several media channels that his goal, all of his life, had been to become World Chess Champion. Once he had accomplished that, he concluded that playing chess competitively was no longer a challenge, and that if he did not have something significant to gain, there was no longer any reason for him to play.


4

Another idea is that it was strategy at it's deepest. He waited until the most important match of his career to use this part of his opening repertoire. In "Fischer-Spassky, Reyjavik 1972" C.H.O'D Alexander writes of game six. "This game was notable for two things. First, Fischer played the Queen's Gambit for the first time in his life in a serious game; ...


4

Fischer objected to the proximity of the spectators, the intensity of the lighting, and the noise of the cameras. He did not request a separate venue. It was the organizers who suggested the ping-pong room as a compromise to address his objections. They then set to work modifying the conditions in the main playing hall to meet his demands. By the start of ...


3

After beating Spassky in 1972, Fischer laid out terms that were deemed unreasonable for his title defense in the next world championship against Karpov. With no resolution, Fischer's title was forfeited and Karpov became the new WC by default. Fischer subsequently fades into obscurity. Nevertheless, Fischer never accepted his title loss, and still ...


3

You have to understand the time. There was a cold war going on and chess was very important to the Soviets who saw chess as proof that their far-left system of government was better. The Soviets would spare no expense to win at chess and used innumerable armies of analysts to analyze every single move Fischer made from the time he was 15. Fischer was smart ...


3

With 9. dxc5, you are giving up your central pawn duo, taking on doubled pawns, fracturing your queenside pawn structure, etc. Obviously this is not ideal, and you would only do this if you get some kind of material compensation. But you don't get any material compensation. After 9...Qa5, you can't simultaneously defend the c3- and c5-pawns. You'd be stuck ...


2

White has completed his development, and Black has not, giving White an advantage. The reason this is true is because of Black's queen moves. Therefore, the way to prevent Black from completing his development is to harass the queen. When the smoke clears, White will have a clear advantage in development, going into the endgame, making him a heavy favorite.


2

I think he also may have just lost interest in chess. He did invent fisherRandom chess later after his resignation to karpov, saying that normal chess had become really bland for him. This and his mental issues combined led to him quitting. I think it's a shame.


1

When you get more experience and appreciate positional play instead of just slash and burn tactics and material advantage then you would see that the move is terrible bad and has no advantages for white. When the dust settles black will have the initiative and material will be even and white has a weak isolated pawn.


1

Yes. Fischer was in dire straits for money. And he was a little less an arrogant kiddie brat at that age.


1

Fischer was noted for his attacking play derived from Kingside openings. He had to figure that Spassky (and other Soviet masters) would analyze this play. Therefore, he played variations, particularly queenside games, where he didn't have much of a "footprint," where people couldn't prepare as well. In essence, he was "starting from scratch, and relying ...


1

That is all very silly. It the KG is as fine in most lines for top players as much as for amateurs. The computer gives equal or tiny negative in most lines, plus in others. But does so when white is down a pawn. That means that it considers that White has an attack advantage that is equal to a pawn. Equal from a computer when you have gambited a pawn means ...


1

The King's Gambit has been analyzed to the point, where White fails to retain his advantage with proper play by Black. That's why it is inadvisable to use it against opponents as strong as you. But it is an aggressive opening that works well against weaker opponents. Spassky may have won more games against weaker players using it than players of equal ...


1

The idea Nc3-b1 has gradually become well known. In general, the idea is to get the knight to a better square, e.g. the c4 square. Another consequence is that the a1-h8 diagonal opens and can be controlled by the white queen at some point. The third is that the c2-pawn can move forward. In this position, white wants to attack, but has to mobilize the forces ...


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