13

One of Black's development plans will include moves like Nd7 intending Ne5 hitting the Q and Bishop if the Q is on d3. This will cost White an important tempo in this dynamic opening. Black's plans revolve around control of the c4 square hoping to place a piece on this square. Depending on White's particular move order Black may play b5, Bb7, Nd7, Nb6, Nc4, ...


12

Besides Mike Jones' correct positional explanation, Black is also losing material at once after the simple 8.Ndb5. White attacks the d6 pawn, whose capture would also deprive Black of castling rights. 9.Nd5 followed by a fork on c7 is an even bigger threat ensuring that there is no defense: 8...Bf8 9.Nd5 Rb8 (what else ?) 10.Nbc7 Kd7 is awful, when the ...


12

This move creates several weaknesses, at f6, d5, and d6, and restricts the movement of the Bg7. The outpost weakness is usually shown by the game https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1257953. The d6 weakness is basically using all you pieces to attack the pawn and, once all of black's pieces on defending it, to shift the attack to another point and, ...


11

Qd2 is used in these lines to support the Be3, which is typically played to h6 to exchange for the Bg7, followed by a pawn attack on the king-side.


9

Typically you use a pawn storm to exchange pawns around the castled enemy king and thereby to open lines and diagonals for an attack. Most of the time you want a closed (to some extent) center in order to avoid counterplay in the center. In this sense your example 4 is not a typical use case for a pawn storm. It might make sense to push the pawns here as ...


6

The main purpose of a pawn storm is to exchange pawns and open lines. Therefore, in the ideal case you should push the pawn that can easily be exchanged. With a Black pawn on g6, it makes sense to play h4-h5. The only way White's g-pawn could be directly exchanged would be if Black had a pawn on h6 (as is the case in your first diagram). However, g4 can be ...


4

Without giving a long, drawn out explanation, the simple answer is that you're decreasing the mobility of the queen. The queen only has three legal moves from d3 and all of them waste time. Qd2 loses a tempo since you could have played Qd2 the move before. Same with Qe2. Qd1 wastes two moves. The value of moves comes from the value of the pieces and the ...


4

I'd play h4 in positions 3 and 4, without losing the g4 tmepo. As for 1 and 2, I'd follow the same criteria except if Black's ...h5 reaction is strong enough to give me a reason to play g4


4

For starters, 13.Kb1 is considered the main line and scores at 73% to only 51% for 13.h5. In general, I do not think it is very good to ever allow the Rc3 exchange sac there. In the main line, 13.Kb1 Nc3 14.Bc4 Rc4 15.g4 Rfc8, Karpov already would play 16.Nde2 there (or a very similar position), and he won some great games. 19.gf was already a big mistake ...


4

Something that instantly stands out to me is that 12. Bd4 challenges black's strong fiancettoed bishop. Black must submit to trading pieces or weaken his bishop. Also,12. Bd4 removes pressure from the c3 knight. This piece is in a bit of a weak position, especially since one of its defenders is a pawn next to the king that we don't really want to move, and ...


3

Fischer - Larsen, Portoroz 1958 also known as "Slaying the Dragon" in his book, 60 Memorable games is recommended required reading. The opening moves for the dragon, accelerated and hyperaccelerated dragon may be found in Parimarjan Negi's e4 vs. the Sicilian: Vol 2.


3

For a more meaningful answer, it'd be a great idea to know what your current skill level is. That being said: Knowing an opening is not about knowing "what's on the book". If you can't find the correct response when your opponent deviates, then to all practical effects it's as if you didn't know anything the opening, no matter how depth into the ...


3

Pretty much any open Sicilian when both sides have castled King-side Black can seek counter-play against the center by undermining the Knight on c3 with b5-b4 ideas or if allowed Rxc3 exchange sacs. Also thematic is trying to play d5. Bent Larsen said something to the effect that the Sicilian was a positional trick where you trade a wing-pawn for a ...


2

The queen on d2 allows for a future Bh6 exchanging the bishops and preparing a h4-h5 push with a strong attack for White. With Qd3, you are exposing it to attack (...Nc6-e5 is a typical maneuvre in this type of posiiton). You also prevent your bishop from going to c4 which is a typical square where it's placed. Also note that Black's ...e6 is a very bad move,...


2

In the line with 9.0-0-0 d5, by contrast with 9.Bc4 or 9.0-0-0 Bd7, the center gets open and White is more often aiming for play in the center than on the h-file. White wants to neutralize the strong Bg7 and any possible counterplay on the b-file and exploit the weaknesses on c6, c5, d6 and the open d-file. After the usual 12...e5 (12...Bxd4 13.Qxd4 Qb6 is ...


2

Karpov-Kortchnoi from the 1974 Candidates Final which turned out to decide the World Champion is a famous and appealing dragon game and part of chess history.


2

What are the plans for Black when White castles short in the Sicilian dragon Good news. Black's position is fine; a useful half-open c-file without risks being blow off on the king side. White's short castling is a weaker plan to fight for advantage. Black has decent chances to take over the board: Move your rooks to the c-file Prepare for thematic d5 ...


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