12

Great question. This is a very open position (pawns are not obstructing pieces). As a result, each player has enormous choice on each move (in this case, more true for White). So, 'planning' is very hard, because predictability is very low. That said, you can make progress after the initial development of your pieces in a few ways: I find it useful in open ...


12

you next moves as white will be 7. Ng5.. and you will activate your Queen - dependig of the Blacks move it may be 8.Qf3 or 8.Qd5 Attack the King and use weakness for f7 Some exmaples: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bb4+ 5.c3 dxc3 6.O-O cxb2 7. Bxb2 Nge7 8. Ng5 O-O 9. Qh5 or: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bb4+ 5.c3 dxc3 6.O-O ...


7

The issue is that 4. d5 is a much better move; White establishes a strong center with tempo and drives the c6 knight to a bad position. Besides, 3... Nf6 isn't that popular either (probably because of 4. d5); 3... exd4 is the main line of the Scotch Game.


7

Bg4 could be annoying to meet in this position for a few reasons: It would force white to move the queen to an awkward square, play f3 opening the g1-a7 diagonal or play the passive Ne2. White would prefer not to trade light squared bishops (with Be2) here as Bc8 is black's worse piece. Ne2, Qd2 and f3 all allow Bh5 with the idea of Bg6 essentially forcing ...


7

I think you are on to something, and statistically, there is a very good reason to play the Scotch over the Ruy Lopez, but that might not be all there is to it. I think that the main reason is that we are taught that the Ruy Lopez is THE most classical opening, and is the best. I have seen that mindset in SO many books written by the top players over the ...


7

The queen move threatens the d4 knight. Also keep in mind that your opponent might play Bc5 later to get another attacker on the knight and pressure f2. Bc4 or Nc3 don't protect the knight, so they lose a piece. You can reject those moves. Be3 seems OK. Moving the d4 knight to b3, b5, or f3 seems fine, as does Nxc6. I wouldn't want to play an immediate c3 to ...


6

My first thought would be to transpose back into the main line with 5. Be3 Bc5. Upon further investigation, since there's no (indirect) pressure on f2, I would play 5. Nb3. This move prevents ... Bc5 and makes Qf6 look misplaced. (Prevention of development for your opponent can be considered part of your development.) Black would remain cramped (probably ...


5

I only see three alternative moves to defend the f2 square: 6.Be3 Bxe3 7.fxe3 results in doubled isolated center pawns, not something I would like to play with. 6.Qd2 and 6.Qe2 block the bishops. I guess it's a matter of what you like to play with. If you block one of your bishops, you can later play the queen again or fianchetto the bishop. 6.Qd2 and then ...


5

I know this is a 2 year old post now, which I've visited a few times before now but now I couldn't resist posting my comment. The Scotch has been my favorite White opening for the last 3-4 years. I really like it and it helps me that top players(including Kasparov play it..not that I am anywhere near that standard!!). It can give an opening advantage, but ...


4

I suggest you also have a look at The Scotch Game by Yelena Dembo and Richard Pallister. This is not a book for people wanting to discover and learn the ideas of the opening, but rather a complete repertoire for white to play it. Thus, it offers several possible continuations for white in almost every variation, all explored in depth and detail (which suits ...


4

I'd recommend Starting Out: The Scotch It covers everything the Scotch has to offer, and it is written by an expert player in it. Like the rest of the Starting out Series, it explains everything you will ever need to know on the opening. It offers great tips on whatnot. There are lots of sources for minor stuff. Chess Caffe is a great source. Also ...


4

I religiously play scotch in e4/e5 games. Sergei Rublevsky is the star I follow.


3

After 4....Qf6, both 5.Be3 and 5.Nxc6 are likely to transpose to 4....Bc5: 5.Be3 Bc5 and 5.Nxc6 Bc5. Instead, 5.Nf3 seems to be an interesting alternative, with chances to obtain an advantage. It worked quite well for Giri, as he was pressing the entire game. After 5.Nf3, black should probably be able to equalize. Andreikin played the precise 5....Bb4+ and ...


3

Fundamental Chess Openings - FCO, by Paul van de Sterren. Good explanations on planning and ideas, light on deep lines.


3

It's better to castle on move 7 and sacrifice the knight next move. Black will have a hard time defending against this. The variation with 5.Ng5 is called the Perreux Variation and is extensively analysed at the following site: The Perreux Variation of the Two Knights Defense A critical line begins with 6...Qe7+! [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 ...


3

White has the better position because of superior development. After Black's forced move, White's next move should be Nc3. It will head to d5 and join the kingside attack unless Black plays BxNc3. Then White gets the bishop pair to compensate for his fewer pawns. In any event, White has cleared his first rank so that his queen and two rooks can get into ...


2

The book the scotch game explained by Gary Lane has a chapter that covers the variation in question. Looking here Qf6 is played in the majority of games from the line up until that point. If you are not happy with the line maybe look at a different reply to the scotch.


2

First of all, 4...f6 is not the strongest option for black. The move f7-f6 weakens the light squares around the black king (e6, f7 and g6). Also, it occupies the f6-square where the Ng8 is headed. Having said this, my advice is to grab on d4, castle kingside and attack the black king. White has a solid plus after f7-f6. For instance, how will black castle ...


2

One very popular beginners book about openings from the black side is this one. The focus isn't on grandmaster level opening theory, but on keeping everything understandable and manageable.


2

"An Attacking Repertoire for White" by Sam Collins has a chapter on the Scotch which does cover many of the offbeat variations. After 4. ... d6 he writes "No one does this, for the simple reason that it fails to pressurise White's center and allows him a free hand in developing. After 5. c4 Nf6 6. Bc3 Be7... 12. b4! White has a clear advantage." "e4 White is ...


2

Quality Chess will publish a book on 1.e4 (hopefully in a few month) which will feature the Scotch as far as I know. It is part of a two book repertoire and will be about 1…e5, Caro-Kann and minor lines. This will be a "Grandmaster Guide" and not a "Grandmaster Repertoire" so it is aimed at slightly weaker players. It should contain the Scotch and the ...


2

You're making it harder for black to make his bishop a good piece that does work. To accomplish that objective you have to make that move right then (timing being an important factor here) whereas other improving moves like Re1 or Qf3 can be played then or a few moves in the future. If black played 9. Bg4 instead of castling white could get a nice tempo and ...


2

Magnus Carlsen has some games as White you might look for. GM Parimarjan Negi authored a DVD on the Scotch and has himself played it on many occasions. Fischer loved the Ruy Lopez so didn't have much need for the Scotch, and in general fashion has favored the Ruy Lopez. Then Kasparov resurrected the Scotch (he even had an affair with the Evan's Gambit) and ...


2

After 6.Qf3, black can Not initiate Q trade 6... gxc6 7. Be2 or Nd2. In this case black's N has some develop problem as Q is blocking its natural f6 square. Trade Qs 6... Qxf3 7. gxf3 bxc6 8 Be3. And normally after that 8... Bxe3 fxe3. In this case, white has better central control. White's K normally stays behind and guards the e/f pawns. Black's weak a ...


2

3...Nf6 is inferior, so white's possibilities thereafter are not seriously analysed. 4.Bg5 is probably not popular among players who do reach this position, because there are at least 5 better moves (4.d5 in particular), and it doesn't really achieve anything as Black can just play ...Be7. Bg5 works better when Black has already played ...Bc5 and ...d6 ...


2

I generally prefer GM Negi Parimarjan, who is the master of the Scotch Opening and, as mentioned above, he has created a DVD series. He has played Scotch lots of times.


1

I don't think white minds gxf3. He gets a half-open g file for his rook and he is capturing towards the center. I suppose black will respond with bxc6 and I would play Nd2 going for Nb3 next move and asking black where his bishop will go. If it goes back to b6 then pawn a4 seems like a very nice position for white, while other moves he will play f4 anyways ...


1

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 Nxd4, both 4.Nxd4 and 4.Nxe5 seem to lead to an advantage for white. However, it's hard to tell which of the two options is best. Therefore it's a matter of taste. 4.Nxd4 exd4 5.Qxd4 transposes to the Scottish main line, where black played the inferior 4....Nxd4. This option is the easiest for white: white stays in his ...


1

They're playing on the extremely high level and opening preparation is amongst the things they invest the most of their time so they're always searching for the new ways to spice the game up and thus increase their chances for the victory.I don't think there's a deep idea behind Nf3.


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