17

I like your question a lot. Though I don't play either side of any 1. e4 e5 openings, it got me thinking about the motivations behind playing the Scotch Game. Though you were clearly happy with the answer you accepted, I'm adding another answer because I don't personally understand how that one addresses the question as you asked it, and I think some further ...


13

As you say, each of the options 5. ... Nxd8 and 5. ... Kxd8 has its own drawbacks: the former drops a pawn and the latter gives up castling rights. In this situation Kelley is right that losing the pawn is significantly worse than giving up the right to castle. In a typical middlegame that features a lot of firepower on board for both sides, a king stuck in ...


13

First, I'd note that the most popular move after 4... Bc5 (according to the game databases of both Chess Tempo and Chess Games) is actually 5. Be3, and I suppose there's an argument to be made that it's both the more ambitious and the more principled move because it attempts to maintain control and/or occupation of the d4 square rather than immediately ...


12

Great question. This is a very open position (pawns are not obstructing pieces). As a result, each player has enormous choice on each move (in this case, more true for White). So, 'planning' is very hard, because predictability is very low. That said, you can make progress after the initial development of your pieces in a few ways: I find it useful in open ...


12

you next moves as white will be 7. Ng5.. and you will activate your Queen - dependig of the Blacks move it may be 8.Qf3 or 8.Qd5 Attack the King and use weakness for f7 Some exmaples: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bb4+ 5.c3 dxc3 6.O-O cxb2 7. Bxb2 Nge7 8. Ng5 O-O 9. Qh5 or: [FEN ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Bb4+ 5.c3 dxc3 6.O-O ...


8

Often losing the right to castle is OK for Black if queens are of the board. Take the Berlin Defense for example: rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1 [StartPly "16"] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4.O-O Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 Kramnik used this opening to win the title from Kasparov in 2000.


7

This is indeed the Scotch game. It is my favourite White opening. Why? It is really easy to learn as a beginner but has a fantastic pedigree of top level GM games to back it up! So it offers great possibilities and I enjoy it (Kasparov & Blackburne have enjoyed playing it too so it really cannot be bad! Paul Morphy played the closely related Scotch ...


7

I think f6 is an uninspiring move. It doesn't force anything, blocks the Knight on g8, and exposes the King. 365chess.com says that Black's win percentage is wretched after f6; in fact it's the weakest reply with Black winning only about 16% of the games. Good continuations include the trade of Knights in the middle with 5. Nxd4 Nxd4 6. Qxd4 or 5. O-O. ...


7

Bg4 could be annoying to meet in this position for a few reasons: It would force white to move the queen to an awkward square, play f3 opening the g1-a7 diagonal or play the passive Ne2. White would prefer not to trade light squared bishops (with Be2) here as Bc8 is black's worse piece. Ne2, Qd2 and f3 all allow Bh5 with the idea of Bg6 essentially forcing ...


7

The issue is that 4. d5 is a much better move; White establishes a strong center with tempo and drives the c6 knight to a bad position. Besides, 3... Nf6 isn't that popular either (probably because of 4. d5); 3... exd4 is the main line of the Scotch Game.


7

I think you are on to something, and statistically, there is a very good reason to play the Scotch over the Ruy Lopez, but that might not be all there is to it. I think that the main reason is that we are taught that the Ruy Lopez is THE most classical opening, and is the best. I have seen that mindset in SO many books written by the top players over the ...


6

Basically, f6 is a blunder, hands down. Take the pawn in the middle, keep your light bishop on the diagonal preventing Black from castling, and ride that positional advantage into the home stretch. Here is what stockfish sees after a few (note that it is important to wait and allow stockfish to get to at least 20 moves of analysis - it can make a difference)...


6

If you are interested in the history of this opening, there is a very interesting article here on the Edinburgh Chess Club's website. It tells of the series of correspondence games between Edinburgh Chess Club and London Chess club commencing in 1824, when it is believed the Scotch opening was first played. In the 1820's, the moves had to be relayed by ...


5

I know this is a 2 year old post now, which I've visited a few times before now but now I couldn't resist posting my comment. The Scotch has been my favorite White opening for the last 3-4 years. I really like it and it helps me that top players(including Kasparov play it..not that I am anywhere near that standard!!). It can give an opening advantage, but ...


5

Other users have pointed out that this is called the Scotch Game. A simple google search would have provided that, but I just wanted to point out some of my experience playing as white since I have tried to play this opening every chance I get (well mostly every chance)? I don't believe it used as much on the professional stage, but more at an amateur or ...


5

I only see three alternative moves to defend the f2 square: 6.Be3 Bxe3 7.fxe3 results in doubled isolated center pawns, not something I would like to play with. 6.Qd2 and 6.Qe2 block the bishops. I guess it's a matter of what you like to play with. If you block one of your bishops, you can later play the queen again or fianchetto the bishop. 6.Qd2 and then ...


4

To answer your question, no, against a peer, the Scotch Defense will not give you an opening advantage. 3. d4 followed by standard positional play by white doesn't seem to do the trick. However, the Scotch Gambit is more daring. If accepted, it yields an asymmetrical advantage of time versus material. If you're tactically sharp you may score some points ...


4

This is one of my favorite openings, but unlike others here, I prefer the gambit lines. After 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 I (almost) always play 4. c3 dxc3 5.Bc4 ..., the Goering Gambit. I won't say this is a perfectly sound line, but it's a lot of fun and more threatening than you might think. In fact, I have read (though I can't remember where at the ...


4

Capture with the king and hang on to the pawn. The value of the "right" to castle is greatly reduced after queens are exchanged. If it goes into an early "endgame" (with the exchange of a couple more pieces), having the king in the middle of the board would even be an advantage.


4

Given the moves in your post, the position favors White. I think most White players would enjoy the seeing the Black King out there, suffering a pin, sitting on an open file, and flapping in the breeze on move 8 with Queens on the board. Here's what Stockfish thinks after a reasonably long think: [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.Ng5 d5 6....


4

According to the 365chess database, 5. Bg5 yielded a 6-2-0 record for amateur players. There were no master games. The pawn on e4 isn't too much of a liability as long as Black's King is in the middle of the board. Here's a game where White is a FIDE(?) 2095 player. White's cute little combination on move 12 ought to tell Black he's in for a long day. ...


4

I suggest you also have a look at The Scotch Game by Yelena Dembo and Richard Pallister. This is not a book for people wanting to discover and learn the ideas of the opening, but rather a complete repertoire for white to play it. Thus, it offers several possible continuations for white in almost every variation, all explored in depth and detail (which suits ...


4

I'd recommend Starting Out: The Scotch It covers everything the Scotch has to offer, and it is written by an expert player in it. Like the rest of the Starting out Series, it explains everything you will ever need to know on the opening. It offers great tips on whatnot. There are lots of sources for minor stuff. Chess Caffe is a great source. Also ...


4

I religiously play scotch in e4/e5 games. Sergei Rublevsky is the star I follow.


3

Fundamental Chess Openings - FCO, by Paul van de Sterren. Good explanations on planning and ideas, light on deep lines.


3

White has the better position because of superior development. After Black's forced move, White's next move should be Nc3. It will head to d5 and join the kingside attack unless Black plays BxNc3. Then White gets the bishop pair to compensate for his fewer pawns. In any event, White has cleared his first rank so that his queen and two rooks can get into ...


3

It's better to castle on move 7 and sacrifice the knight next move. Black will have a hard time defending against this. The variation with 5.Ng5 is called the Perreux Variation and is extensively analysed at the following site: The Perreux Variation of the Two Knights Defense A critical line begins with 6...Qe7+! [fen ""] 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 ...


3

After 4....Qf6, both 5.Be3 and 5.Nxc6 are likely to transpose to 4....Bc5: 5.Be3 Bc5 and 5.Nxc6 Bc5. Instead, 5.Nf3 seems to be an interesting alternative, with chances to obtain an advantage. It worked quite well for Giri, as he was pressing the entire game. After 5.Nf3, black should probably be able to equalize. Andreikin played the precise 5....Bb4+ and ...


2

First of all, 4...f6 is not the strongest option for black. The move f7-f6 weakens the light squares around the black king (e6, f7 and g6). Also, it occupies the f6-square where the Ng8 is headed. Having said this, my advice is to grab on d4, castle kingside and attack the black king. White has a solid plus after f7-f6. For instance, how will black castle ...


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