20

According to the FIDE rules, it is not forbidden; clock times are actually explicitly stated as one of the items that a scoresheet may contain. See the following excerpt (emphasis mine): Article 8: The recording of the moves 8.1 a. In the course of play each player is required to record his own moves and those of his opponentin the correct ...


13

The rules for this and how it works are spelled out in articles 9.3, 9.4 and 9.5 of the FIDE Laws of Chess. They don't mention whether or not you are allowed to check your scoresheet to do this because you are always allowed to check your scoresheet. You would be very foolish to not check your scoresheet first because there are penalties for an incorrect ...


5

I used to keep scoresheets in the past, but it's tedious to keep them. Firstly, you may not recognise the writing that you recorded in hurry during the game. Besides, it is hard to be systematic with them: a single shuffle will make your games jumble up, and it will waste a lot of time. Therefore, instead of doing it manually, I do it electronically. The ...


4

A cigar box is one way that I've heard of in the past. Those scorebooks are totally 100% absolutely worth it btw. It's vastly more organized than having hundreds of loose sheets.


4

Yes you're absolutely allowed to look at the score-sheet. What you're not allowed to do is make special symbols/notes on the scoresheet to remind you of things. But that's non-applicable here.


3

I don't know of any proven method but here's one idea: you could try to imagine writing the move. Translate your move into algebraic notation, imagine the text on your scoresheet, maybe even trace it with your finger. Hopefully that will be enough of a pause in your train of thought to enable you to see the move from a different perspective, which I think is ...


3

Does anybody have a (larger) body of scoresheet images + respective PGNs or knows which persons/entities could potentially provide those? All FIDE rated tournaments where norms are available (so must have a minimum number of GMs, IMs and federations playing in the tournament) are required to submit PGNs of games played to FIDE to ensure the integrity of ...


3

According to an annotated version of the FIDE rules, it's banned in some tournaments, which presumably means it's not banned in all tournaments. The relevant annotation says: Article 11.3.1 has resulted in some tournaments banning the use of scorebooks. Where these are allowed arbiters should ensure that players do not refer to earlier games. I've ...


2

I've built some software that makes it possible to 'scan' your paper scoresheet into electronic .pgn format just by taking a picture of it with your phone after the game (you have to use a particular format for it to understand). The website, then keeps an electronic copy of the game on your behalf. Let me know if you are interested in trying it out-> www....


2

Generally speaking the answer is "No". The reason being this section of the FIDE Laws of Chess - 11.3.1 During play the players are forbidden to use any notes, sources of information or advice, or analyse any game on another chessboard. In practice it will depend on the competition. If it is your local chess league or internal club competition where ...


2

2c: Seems logical to use the symbol for zugzwang (no good move) and checkmate next to each other: ‡# (zugzwang is usually a circle with a dot at the centre.)


2

On your scoresheet you are required to record the result which 99.99% of the time will be one of 1-0, 0-1, ½-½. In the very rare cases when it is not one of those somebody will almost certainly be appealing the arbiter's / organizer's decision ;-). You are not required to put how that result was achieved, e.g. flag dropped, resigned, defaulted, draw by 3-...


2

Is there a substitute for this strategy that still uses the scoresheet, but is legal under Fide rules? According to 12.3a FIDE: 12.3a During play the players are forbidden to make use of any notes, sources of information or advice, or analyse on another chessboard. Therefore, if any performed action is considered as making use of notes, it is a ...


2

I know there is such a rule but in practice, even if in serious tournaments it's not necessarily enforced. I had a game in World Open at Philadelphia a few years ago and my opponent wrote on his score sheet before making any move. I was debating if I should report and finally I reported to TD and TD warned him. The next time he did that I reported again and ...


2

It's pretty obvious that his name is absolutely no and his opponent's name is shorts allowed.


1

Of course it is very hard to remember how many moves have passed. Is white allowed to look at the scoresheet and count the number of moves during the game? In a serious tournament game, you would stop the clocks and ask the arbiter to come and check your scoresheets. I remember there was a recent incident between Russian GM Alexandra Kosteniuk against ...


1

Stalemate is so rare that it doesn't seem to have it's own notation symbol. It is not listed in the FIDE Handbook, section C.13, which is the official source on these kind of rules. Even the symbol for mate (#) is optional. I would just go for the word 'stalemate' like you did.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible