13

Against a white d4-e5 pawn formation, Black wants to play c5 (see e.g. the French opening). In the Caro-Kann, that will cost two moves (c7-c6-c5), while in the Scandinavian, it's only one move since the pawn is still on c7. That's one tempo, and as @Qudit notes in the comments, in the main line Scandinavian White usually wins a tempo by chasing the black ...


11

This is a bit trivial as an answer, but too long as a comment. You claim that you can develop "as good as White" but that is simply not true. White begins by interposing the Bishop 4.Be2. You play 4..Bg4. It is now a mistake to play 5.Nf3 because 5..Bxf3 spoils whites Pawns and makes his King insecure. But 5.d4! also gains a development tempo, and forces ...


9

Seems to me some players have a critical opinion about the Scandi mostly based on the fact that White gains time on the queen with Nc3. Actually, White only recovers the tempo "lost" on his second move (exd5). Someone even called it "theoretically inferior" based on the first few moves. The Scandi is perfectly playable, and there are several strong GMs ...


8

Spielmann Gambit [Event "?"] [ECO "B02"] [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/ b - - 0 1"] [Setup "1"] 1. e4 d5 2. Nc3 (2...d4 {Probably the best move} 3. Nce2 {And probably the only reasonable retreat. White is losing the advantage of playing as White side here, that's true. That's why this is an 'unusual' reply. Both sides gonna fight for e5 square ...


8

If you really must, because your friend bet a wager that he can beat you as black in this position, here are the imbalances, concrete and possible, that you must look out for (as white): [FEN ""] 1.e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 Black's open d-file Active LSB Kingside pawn majority Still, this is not without its weaknesses: A delay in ...


7

1.e4 d5 2.d4 tranposes to the Blackmar-Diemer gambit (1.d4 d5 2.e4 dxe4 3.Nc3)


7

This is what I try to accomplish as white, but I play Nf3 first. Although your can't take advantage this early, there are good moves depending on your temperament. Qe4+ forces Qe2, else a pawn hangs, and the trade of queens. Qa5 pins the d-pawn which gives you the opportunity to get in c5 (e5 is more drawish) and get a central majority. With a normal game ...


7

First, black is hardly busted here, and Stockfish 11 confirms this with both 10...Be7 and 10...b5 being 0.00 at a depth of 30. 10...Bb4 is also reasonable. That said, as I force in the moves it believes are best, it eventually sometimes thinks white has a slight pull, which is not surprising given the clear space advantage. At the same time, in practice, per ...


6

I heard from everyone that only beginners do it for a reason but I can't exactly figure out why nobody else would use that defense. It's not true that nobody but beginners use the Scandinavian - I use it, and my rating is in the 1700s. The opening is, however, somewhat rare; I've only seen it about 4% of the time when I've played 1.e4 in tournament games. ...


6

The pawn structure in the Caro-Kann Classical Variation and the Scandinavian can be the exact same. The optimal pawn breaks are either pushing the c6 pawn to c5 or pushing the e6 pawn to e5. The differences are in the positions of the pieces, which is why far more people play the Caro-Kann than the Scandinavian. In the Scandinavian, black spends many tempi ...


6

For a Computer, White is Better. For a Human, it's unclear. White has quite a few advantages here - notably more space and superior development. Black has one major advantage, though. White's king is exposed and shall remain so for quite some time. Computers excel at positions in which perfect defensive play is required - that is, positions such as White ...


6

A very uncomfortable position [fen "r3k2r/pp1n1ppp/3bp3/q2p3P/3P2P1/3B4/PPP2P2/R1BQ1RK1 w kq - 0 6"] I have analysed this resulting position several times with some great Lc0 and 80+CPU stockfishes. My verdict from that is that white objectively has some advantage, but for humans it is so difficult to understand that they will mess it up. Also the ...


5

I don't think there is a coverage for this line, but if you don't mind, I have been playing this line for years, so here's my thought. In this position, black generally takes on f3. The reason is that the move Bg4 per se is aiming to trade off the knight at f3, if not, black will have no reason to play this move among others. What if black doesn't exchange ...


5

I actually used to play the Scandinavian a lot in blitz a couple of years ago, then got bored with my line and never used it again. The starting position in your diagram is actually one of the typical positions one reaches in this opening, although with slight variations, (like same position with e6, c6 already played etc.) Since you said you've been ...


5

The 3. .. Qe5+ is not a great continuation for black. Because: It does not threaten anything really. White can block with developing (!) a bishop: 4. Be2. It places blacks Queen in the center very early in the game where it will be a target of the attack for many whites pawns and pieces. Square e5 is far from a permanent position for the black queen, and ...


4

In my opinion you should try other openings as well. The Scandinavian itself is sound, but it actually doesn't teach you many "basic opening principles". It breaks some of them, instead (like "avoid moving your pieces twice" and "develop your light pieces before your heavy pieces"). Since there's a strategy beyond the opening despite all these "side ...


4

I would say that the only obvious target for black (meaning a plan that's almost build into the opening) is applying pressure to the white d pawn, assuming white does play d4. Then of course he should try to break with either c5 or e5. I can recommend checking out IM John Bartholomew, he's got a Youtube channel and he's a huge fan of the Scandi Qd8 line, I ...


4

But why it's a bad move? You are moving your queen to a square where it is going to be attacked again soon and then you will have to move the queen for a third time. Meanwhile white is developing fast and you have no pieces developed.


3

If you are having trouble with it, maybe you need to slow down the aggression! My advice is to play 2.e5. It is theoretically a "bad" move because it allows your opponent to play an improved Caro-Kann or French. But at your skill level, nobody who goes for the Scandinavian will know anything about how to play those!


3

The pawn structures are the same, which means the typical pawn breaks are also the same. Black often tries for ...c5 and sometimes ...e5, while White always has a thematic d5 break in mind. However, in the Scandinavian Black must waste a few tempi moving his queen. This means that White's plan more often involves early attacks as opposed to the Caro-kann.


3

Fundamentally speaking, Black's position has no weaknesses, but is behind in development. Theory says if Black can solve his development, he will be equal. Magnus Carlsen has played this position as black (vs Fabiano, Tromsoe Ol, 2014, 0-1, 50), as have many other GMs, the likely reason because black has no weaknesses to speak of, and can draw equal. The ...


3

Keeping the queen in the center vulnerable to attack cannot be Black's best option. Be2 is the obvious move for reasons you gave. Black can't exploit it, and while e2 is not the best of squares for the bishop, it's still development. David Letterman played the 3...Qe6+ line against Kasparov in a televised game. Kasparov played 4. Be2, and after 4...Nc6 5. ...


3

I am still not sure whether this answers your question, but: Scandinavian tends to lead to more open/tactical games while the Dutch tends to lead to more closed/positional games. If you want to profile openings I suggest to take a database and check game positions of master players around move 10-15 and see whether you like any of those positions. But ...


3

I was not able to find an idea on how to generate long-term counterplay. How can Black generate queenside counterplay that gives him equality? It might be cruel for you but...answer is simple: in this position black can not achieve equality or counterplay at all. Your opening choice made you wait for him to kill you or if he's not able to (can't find as you ...


3

Qe5+ is not a blunder or a mistake but it is definitely inaccurate play. Qa5 (most popular line) keeps a check on 2 central squares as well as Qd8. Defending with bishop Also in the second line you mentioned (Bc2) after Bg4, white has an excellent move d5! Now white has a tempo in development, space as well as development whereas black is trying to ...


2

I'm a Candidate FIDE Master and I've tried the Scandinavian Defence, and Modern Variation, in the last 2 years. Against weaker opposition my results were very good. Black equalises easily, and quickly, and has very active pieces. The c4 move by white, taking the centre, is hardly a serious problem for the prepared player. After all, many defences concede the ...


2

First of all, let's see how this position is arrived at. This itself will help us evaluate the position and tell us whether Black can equalize, without even performing any detailed analysis. [Event "Queen moves around, wasting time"] [FEN ""] 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qe5+ 4. Be2 Bg4 5. d4 Bxe2 6. Ngxe2 Qa5 7. b4 Qxb4 If we see Black's play, ...


2

I play 1.e4 d5 2.d3 dxe4 3.dxe4


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible