Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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35

First of all I would consider the Preface: The Laws of Chess cannot cover all possible situations that may arise during a game, nor can they regulate all administrative questions. Where cases are not precisely regulated by an Article of the Laws, it should be possible to reach a correct decision by studying analogous situations which are regulated ...


26

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


25

Is this a breach? No. Article 4.7 of the FIDE Laws of Chess defines when a move has been "made". Basically when your hand loses contact with the piece moved/captured/promoted etc. Once the move has been made the opponent may make a move. This applies whether clocks are being used or not. If clocks are being used then the move is "completed" when the player ...


23

According to the FIDE rules, 6.6 At the time determined for the start of the game White’s clock is started. In over the board chess, it's usually Black who does this (you can't have an arbiter start all clocks simultaneously) after the players shake hands and wish each other good luck. If White isn't present, Black may start the clock anyway at the ...


22

Would it be sufficient here to write Ne4+ (meaning Nce4) only (i.e. without the "c" but with "+"), as Nfe4 would not be check? It depends on exactly what you mean by "sufficient". By "normal" definitions of "sufficient" the answer is obviously "yes". "Ne4+" disambiguates and leaves the human reader in no doubt which knight was moved. However it doesn't ...


21

It means Tournament Performance Rating. Very roughly a TPR of 2551 means that the results this player has achieved in this tournament would have been expected of a player rated 2551. That's always a bit problematic. Say you scored 100% against a group of 1500 players, what kind of player would have expected to score that? Well, a 1900 player probably, but ...


20

Most chess sites use some variant of the Elo rating system If you have a much higher rating than your opponent, the expectation is that you will win. So if you do win, then we haven't gained that much information, so the change in rating for both you and your opponent will be small. If your opponent wins, there will be a much larger change in rating as ...


20

Unless this is a trick question, I'd say never: 3.8.2 [] This is a move of the king and either rook of the same colour along the player’s first rank, counting as a single move of the king and executed as follows: the king is transferred from its original square two squares towards the rook on its original square, then that rook is transferred to the ...


18

The FIDE Laws of Chess 2018 are unambiguous: you should write Nce4, and the + sign is optional and not disambiguating. Ne4+ is not sufficient. Appendix C (algebraic notation), article C.10 basically tells you to write Nce4 to distinguish it from Nfe4. It does not mention check or other ways to disambiguate. Article C.13 notes that writing "+" to indicate ...


18

Yes. [Event "Northumbria Masters"] [Site "Newcastle"] [Date "2018.02.18"] [Round "8"] [White "Britton, Richard L"] [Black "Hebden GM, Mark L"] [ECO "C89"] [WhiteElo "2255"] [BlackElo "2454"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [fen ""] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. c3 d6 9. h3 Nb8 10. d4 Nbd7 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Bc2 Re8 13. Nf1 ...


17

In this case, is it allowed to warn your opponent of the potential danger of flagging? Yes. The rule which limits talking to your opponent is the one which forbids annoying the opponent, article 11.5 - 11.5 It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. This includes unreasonable claims, unreasonable offers of a draw or ...


17

It is not a drawn position according to the rules, since there is sufficient mating material. It may be a draw from the point of view of endgame theory, but given players who make lots of mistakes, it wouldn't be all that surprising for one to lose to a tactic. I would let them play until the player who wanted a draw can claim it based on the 50-move rule ...


15

Article 4.3.2 clarifies this - 4.3 Except as provided in Article 4.2 [j'adoube], if the player having the move touches on the chessboard,with the intention of moving or capturing: 4.3.2 one or more of his opponent’s pieces, he must capture the first piece touched that can be captured In the scenario you describe you touch your knight and your ...


15

First, we cannot tell you what the arbiter should have done because we were not there and certainly don't have all the facts. We only have your version of events. What you say was very disturbing may not have been perceived as so disturbing to others there at the time. We weren't there, so we just don't know. We can't judge. As to what you should have done, ...


14

Yes, you should promote to a Queen forcibly. From the article 4.4d of the FIDE laws of chess, we can see that (emphasis mine): 4.4 If a player having the move: ... d. promotes a pawn, the choice of the piece is finalised, when the piece has touched the square of promotion. It's like the capture rule: if you touch an opponent's piece that can be taken ...


13

but that will not affect the game due to his/her hopeless position Well, if your opponent has a hopeless position, they would be better off accepting the 'automatic' draw offer which is implied whenever you make this request: "This constitutes the offer of a draw." Therefore, invoking this III.4 rule is only beneficial if you have a worse position and very ...


13

The rules for this and how it works are spelled out in articles 9.3, 9.4 and 9.5 of the FIDE Laws of Chess. They don't mention whether or not you are allowed to check your scoresheet to do this because you are always allowed to check your scoresheet. You would be very foolish to not check your scoresheet first because there are penalties for an incorrect ...


12

"Tournament performance rating". An approximate measure of the strength that a player performed/played at in the tournament. The calculation of such a performance rating varies, but one method is as follows: If you beat someone at rating X, your performance for that game is X + 400. If you lose to this person, your performance for that game is X - 400. If ...


12

The second part of the question is more straightforward, so I'll look at that first. Is castling with a "ghost" rook like this legal where there was a rook on a1 at the start of the game but it was captured before it could move? Article 3.8.2 of the FIDE Laws of Chess describes how castling works: 3.8.2 by ‘castling’. This is a move of the king ...


11

FIDE Laws of Chess 7.4a If during a game it is found that an illegal move, ..., has been completed, the position immediately before the irregularity shall be reinstated. If the position immediately before the irregularity cannot be determined the game shall continue from the last identifiable position prior to the irregularity. The clocks shall be ...


10

No, Player A cannot do this. FIDE rules of chess article 9.1.1: A player wishing to offer a draw shall do so after having made a move on the chessboard and before stopping his clock and starting the opponent’s clock. An offer at any other time during play is still valid but Article 12.6 must be considered. No conditions can be attached to the offer. ...


10

Take your pick. Conventionally in computer chess, we express your idea of phases as "plies", or half-moves, where 2 plies is one "turn". You can detect checkmate in the ply where the checkmating move is made, but it is more common for checkmate to be detected in the following ply, where your program generates legal moves for the mated player, only to find ...


10

Per FIDE Chess Laws, rule 3.1, a piece is said to attack an opponent’s piece if the player’s piece can make a capture on that square (and in one more special case not relevant here). In full: It is not permitted to move a piece to a square occupied by a piece of the same colour. If a piece moves to a square occupied by an opponent’s piece the latter is ...


10

No, not really. Some problemists might use your case 1 as a joke, but it's not really legal. Your case 2 is certainly not legal (even if the rook had never moved).


10

The 2019 Champions Showdown: Chess 9LX (aka Chess 960) currently taking place in St. Louis should have been a clue. Here is the relevant extract from the FIDE Laws of Chess: Guidelines II. Chess960 Rules II.3 Chess960 castling rules II.3.1 Chess960 allows each player to castle once per game, a move by potentially both the king and rook in a ...


9

No, it's not racist; it's just a convention. Or like the famous chess saying goes: "White begins, Black wins". There are other board games like Go where Black begins, or games where it depends on which variation you play. The main problem with changing who moves first (or alternating it) is that many diagrams which have been printed (especially in opening ...


8

This is a better question than it seems at first glance. Intuitively it seems possible to claim a draw, since the position appears to have occurred three times. However, according to a strict reading of the rules, the position after 4...Ng8 has appeared only for the second time. The relevant clauses are 9.2: [...] Positions are considered the same if ...


8

No, you cannot claim. In fact your right to claim ends as soon as you touch a piece. Here's what the rules say, emphasis in bold mine: 9.2.1 The game is drawn, upon a correct claim by a player having the move, when the same position for at least the third time (not necessarily by a repetition of moves): 9.2.1.1 is about to appear, if he ...


8

According to Article 12.2.3 of the FIDE Laws of Chess it is one of the roles of the arbiter to - 12.2.3 ensure that a good playing environment is maintained Your first course of action should be to bring the matter to the attention of the arbiter. It is not a pleasant thing for him or her to deal with but it is part of the (usually unpaid) job of the ...


8

At this point you should report the Arbiter to FIDE and if applicable the USCF. You could even try to get the result of the game changed. They should have implemented Article 12.9 penalties followed by loss of game if it continued. Now that you have read the articles, you probably see that you could have pressured the Arbiter to implement the rules. [...


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