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31

No, this is not possible. for example move the piece, don't press the clock and then resign? In particular, that loophole is explicitly covered by the rules: 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his opponent’s clock (that is to say, he shall press his clock). This “completes” the ...


6

The FIDE arbiters' Commission disapproves very strongly of arbiters playing in the same competition that they are arbiting in but does not ban it. My own federation told me when I was still qualifying as an arbiter that I may not play in any tournament at the same time that I am arbiting a FIDE rated event. So, for instance if there was a FIDE rated ...


5

I participated in a local, FIDE-rated tournament. In its first round, the chief arbiter paired the players 4 times This has happened to me too, although not as many as 3 repairings that I am aware. As an arbiter I've also done repairing in the first round although only ever in small local events. I would try very, very hard indeed to avoid doing this in a ...


4

Resigning immediately after a checkmate is not possible. HOWEVER, the FIDE rules do allow for a player to do another action, namely withdraw. Withdrawal can be done outside a match and for the most part has the same result, namely that the player is no longer part of the tournament. However, there are penalties involved with this action if the FIDE arbiter ...


4

He could try, but in a real FIDE tournament it would be illegal and not allowed. In a small local club with amateurs who knows how they would rule if nobody knew the real rules. If this were not a FIDE tournament their rules might allow some loophole which might permit it. No way to guess what oddball rules soem other group or club might use; so ...


3

The international chess federation has published the FIDE Laws of Chess which give the rules for playing chess. "Article 2: The initial position of the pieces on the chessboard" would be a good place to start, followed by "Article 3: The moves of the pieces"


2

There are many resources online, but one good start might be the beginner's course on Lichess: https://lichess.org/learn Lichess is free software and free of charge.


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