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73

According to the 2017 version of the Laws of Chess, rule 11.10 says: Unless the regulations of an event specify otherwise, a player may appeal against any decision of the arbiter, even if the player has signed the scoresheet (see Article 8.7).


72

Yes, you can, as long as the king doesn't pass through or end up on an attacked square. From FIDE Laws of Chess: The right to castle has been lost: if the king has already moved, or with a rook that has already moved. Castling is prevented temporarily: if the square on which the king stands, or the square which it must cross, or the ...


58

The official procedure to castle is (Schiller 2003:19–20 from Wikipedia): first move the king with one hand and then move the rook with the same hand. By using both hands the player can save time, as would by as using different hands for moving (like promoting a pawn to queen) or moving with a hand and hitting the clock with the other.


48

Disclaimer: this is probably not the answer, but it makes for interesting thinking. This reminds me of a string bet in poker. String bets are illegal, because they can be used to gain information – “I’ll see your $5”… < watches opponent’s face> "… and raise you $20”. By moving the king first, you are making what would otherwise be ...


42

Yes. Besides making sense, it's also explicitly stated in the rules of the game: 3.9 The king is said to be 'in check' if it is attacked by one or more of the opponent's pieces, even if such pieces are constrained from moving to that square because they would then leave or place their own king in check. No piece can be moved that will either expose the king ...


41

Yes, if the rook is threatened, you may still castle. The threatened squares rule only applies to squares where the king passes (starting and final position included). For example, in the case of white castling queenside, for instance, a threat to a1 or b1 does not prevent the castle from taking place.


38

You are right, this is nonsense. From the FIDE laws of chess, article 5: The game is drawn when the player to move has no legal move and his king is not in check. The game is said to end in ‘stalemate’. If capturing en passant is possible, it is a legal move so if it is the only option, Black is required to play the move. (Or not to move at all and lose ...


38

Executive summary: Black actually can castle, but if he does castle he will lose the knight and the game (due to material loss). Detailed answer: Black and White have equal material. The black knight is protected by two pieces: the king and the queen. The black knight is attacked by two pieces: the queen and rook. If the king castles, the knight will ...


36

Dummy Pawns Today, it is little known that for forty years at the height of the British Empire, Dummy Pawns were the scourge of tournament play, and even grandmasters ran scared. (Possible exaggeration here.) The heresy raged from 1862-1904. See Eminent Victorian Chess Players: Ten Biographies by Tim Harding. Timeline of known events (+/- indicate ...


35

I think the reason becomes more apparent when you consider why the rule is in place for OTB games - an opponent constantly moving their hands around the board and moving the pieces around can be very distracting while the other player is likely still trying to concentrate on the position. By contrast, in online chess both players are using their own ...


35

Edward Winter cites Owen J. Clarkin (Ottawa, Canada) who quotes from The Modern Chess Instructor by W. Steinitz (New York, 1889) which in turn cites this example from Lowenthal's Book of the London Chess Congress, 1862: [Title "Dummy pawn motivation"] [fen "r/1Pp5/2P3p1/8/6pb/4p1kB/4P1p1/6K1 w - - 0 1"] [StartFlipped "0"] 1.bxa8=Q gxh3 If 1 bxa8 and White ...


35

First of all I would consider the Preface: The Laws of Chess cannot cover all possible situations that may arise during a game, nor can they regulate all administrative questions. Where cases are not precisely regulated by an Article of the Laws, it should be possible to reach a correct decision by studying analogous situations which are regulated ...


33

I know in general the rules say the hand you move your piece with has to be the one that hits the clock. If you castled with two hands which one would you use to hit the clock? This might be part of the reason for the rule saying you can only castle with 1 hand.


32

According to the 2018 FIDE Laws of Chess (emphasis mine): 4.2.1 Only the player having the move may adjust one or more pieces on their squares, provided that he first expresses his intention (for example by saying “j’adoube” or “I adjust”). 4.2.2 Any other physical contact with a piece, except for clearly accidental contact, shall be considered ...


31

The basis of your question comes down to whether a piece is truly in position to execute an en passant if it is otherwised pinned. The answer can be found in the FIDE rules stated just before the explicit mention of the en passant: "Positions as in (a) and (b) are considered the same, if the same player has the move, pieces of the same kind and colour ...


31

Really interesting question. I think the following shows that such a situation is sort of possible, depending on how you define the pin: [StartFlipped "0"] [FEN "7k/4p3/8/2KP3r/8/8/8/8 b - - 0 1"] 1... e5 and 2. dxe6 is illegal. The check would go from being stopped by both pawns, to being stopped by neither.


30

This only really applies to over the board games (since online chess servers prevent illegal moves). In a standard time control game, under USCF rules, when the illegal move is noticed by one of the players, a few things happen. First, the illegal move must have been made within the last 10 moves. If not, then the current position stands, and play ...


30

Can a piece put a king in check even though moving that piece would be an illegal move? Yes. One way to see why this makes sense is to imagine "checkless chess", a game that is just like chess, but you win by capturing the king, not by delivering checkmate, and no one is forced to move out of check. This game is exactly the same as chess except that it ...


27

If you drive an enemy king into a corner, you still need to control four different squares to checkmate him. Your king can control two of those squares (but cannot approach the enemy king), your knight can control the third, but there is no way of controlling the fourth. That is, it is impossible for the knight to control both the corner square and the one ...


27

From the FIDE Laws of Chess, article 7.6: If, during a game, it is found that any piece has been displaced from its correct square the position before the irregularity shall be reinstated. If the position immediately before the irregularity cannot be determined, the game shall continue from the last identifiable position prior to the irregularity. The ...


27

Chess rules are all about sequence. If you use two hands, you don't know which happened first. So you always use one hand. First, you make your move, then you hit the clock. As others have pointed out, the rook move alone could be one or two moves. Maybe, you were just moving your rook, maybe you were castling. The King move, however, does determine ...


26

You can declare a draw and in fact you are required to declare a draw but only after you have counted 75 moves by each side without a capture or a pawn move. This is according to the FIDE Laws of Chess article 9.6.2: 9.6 If one or both of the following occur(s) then the game is drawn: 9.6.1 the same position has appeared, as in 9.2.2 at least five ...


25

Is this a breach? No. Article 4.7 of the FIDE Laws of Chess defines when a move has been "made". Basically when your hand loses contact with the piece moved/captured/promoted etc. Once the move has been made the opponent may make a move. This applies whether clocks are being used or not. If clocks are being used then the move is "completed" when the player ...


24

The mere act of touching one of your pieces obligates your opponent to capture it (if legally permitted) on his current move (at least according to USCF standards), unless he explicitly declares his intent to adjust the piece beforehand. Assuming the clock continued running on your opponent's time and he did eventually choose how to capture the knight, I ...


23

I can think of two questions you might be meaning to ask, given the wording of your question. Maybe neither of these is what you're after, but just in case: 1. Is it possible to castle out of check or even checkmate? Here the answer is no. If your king is in check, then castling is not a legal move. 2. Is it possible to castle while checkmating your ...


23

Sometimes, choosing a bishop or a rook is the best move, because of stalemate possibilities. This happens most often with rooks, and very rarely with bishops. For instance, in this famous position from the Saavedra problem: [FEN "8/2P5/8/8/3r4/8/2K5/k7 w - - 0 1"] If white plays 1.c8Q, then black plays 1...Rc4+. White needs to take it or lose his queen ...


23

It is not checkmate if the other player has any legal move that gets them out of check. Capturing the checking piece is one such way; whether the capture is en passant or not is irrelevant for the purpose of this question. In this case, an en passant capture is the only legal move. If the other player didn't know the en passant rule, I suppose they might ...


23

According to the FIDE rules, 6.6 At the time determined for the start of the game White’s clock is started. In over the board chess, it's usually Black who does this (you can't have an arbiter start all clocks simultaneously) after the players shake hands and wish each other good luck. If White isn't present, Black may start the clock anyway at the ...


22

There are three ways to get out of check. Simply move the king away. Block the check, or place a piece in between the king and the opponent's attacking piece. Capture the piece that's checking the king. All of these cases are dependent on the fact that immediately after you make your move, the king is not in check. Therefore, you may capture the queen ...


22

The procedure is (FIDE rules): move the pawn to its promotion square, then replace it with the piece you want. You can take it from the captured pieces yourself, your opponent does nothing. If the piece isn't readily available, you can stop the clock and ask the arbiter to bring one. Your choice of piece is only finalized when it touches the promotion square....


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