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10

In general, it is not easy to develop rooks during the opening per se. Not only it's not easy, it rarely is a goal of the sound opening. In some references, the opening ends, when minor pieces (bishops and knights) are developed and rooks are connected. Therefore, it is highly likely that you are already talking about the middlegame rather than the opening. ...


8

Essentially, you should ask yourself a broader question: where should both of my rooks go in this position? There might be another (half-)open file which can be used by the other rook. If there's only one open file and little chance of another one opening or a pawn needing extra protection, it might not even matter which rook you use, since it's rather ...


8

The FIDE laws of chess say nothing about upside-down rooks. However, starting with upside-down rooks is silly and if your opponent complains that it is annoying, I would expect the claim to be upheld. 11.5 It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. https://handbook.fide.com/chapter/E012018 The proper way of dealing with ...


7

Have a look at the wikipedia article on relative chess piece values, it provides an extensive discussion on the matter. To see how you can compare two given pieces, let's consider your bishop vs rook question at a basic level: A rook's movement is not restricted to a color, unlike the bishop's. This makes half of the board squares inaccessible to a bishop. ...


6

Try to determine which rook will be better off, if left on its current square. Here are some examples (for these I'll assume you have rooks on f1 and a1). As you mentioned, a rook could be defending a weakness right now. Could the file the rook's currently on end up being opened? For example, if White's f-pawn has a good chance of being exchanged, maybe it'...


6

can I force a draw if I am running out of time? Of course! Just swap the queen for the rook. There are two basic possibilities. He keeps the king and rook very close (normal best practice when trying to draw this difficult endgame). In that case every time you threaten the rook with your queen he must move the rook and keep it close to the king. It should ...


5

Quoting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pawnless_chess_endgame#Queen_versus_rook A queen wins against a lone rook, unless there is an immediate draw by stalemate or due to perpetual check, ... (or if the rook or king can immediately capture the queen) The same article also says With perfect play, in the worst winning position, the queen can win ...


4

That's a good question, very difficult. I used to spend a lot of time on such a decision. I remember once when a similar question was asked to GM Vachier-Lagrave, something like why did he put the f1 rook in the open file d1 instead of the a1 rook. He replied: I don't think much about it because most of the time in complex positions we don't know which one ...


4

Article 2.3 of the FIDE Laws of Chess says this: 2.3 The initial position of the pieces on the chessboard is as follows: and is followed by a picture which looks like this: [fen ""] Notice that all four rooks are the right way up. Can I place my rooks upside down at the beginning of the game? Of course you can. However if one of the arbiters sees ...


4

Moving your queen next to your king and moving your king in a diamond around your queen for up to 30 moves seems like it’d be decently fast and not need much thought if you’re really low on time. Every move up to and including the draw is as short as possible, distance-wise.


3

Some general advice about kings cut off on the 7th(or2nd) rank in rook endgames. Involve your king or get your N to f3. 1.Kg1 Nf5!? {going after the f3 pawn.} 2.Rxc5 Nd4 (2...Kg6 also comes into consideration but is not tricky enough. although it is my personal fave) 3.Kf1! (3.Ne5?? Rxe5! -+) Rh2= Involve a pawn! 1.Kg1 h5! {in order to get a pawn to h3 or ...


3

White needs to find a way to make use of his extra pawn, because it is hard to see any other plan. His dream would be to play d4-d5-d6, but this is not yet possible because a) d5 is under Blacks control, and b) the Pe5 would hang. Having the Rooks on e1 and d1 would address both of these issues, and that would be a motive to choose Rad1, but there is still ...


2

A better answer in response to the general question being asked might be as follows: It is often strategic to position the rooks on the d1-e1 squares, which allows them both to support the center files. Naturally the Queen's Rook must be moved to d1 - and the King's Rook to e1, remembering that only the Knights have an ability to jump pieces.


2

Getting the rooks to the middle usually consists of: Developing all the knights and bishops Castling Developing the queen Now that the bank rank is clear, the rooks can use it to go to whichever file they like. If you want the rooks to get to the center slightly faster, castling queenside puts one rook on the D-file without it needing to move again, saving ...


1

It sounds like you have all the tools to do the job, you just need to put it all together. And yes, you can use the magic numbers you found. When your engine initializes (or any time before you begin the search, really) you'll need to pre-compute the move board for every possible permutation of blockers you might encounter during the search. Initialization ...


1

White hasn't lost his castling rights. It's just not a legal move right now. There is a distinction. White would still be able to castle king-side, if the bishop were to move.


1

From experience, you possibly make too many pawn moves, or move light pieces (or the queen) twice or even more often. It is a common error for weaker players to make moves that the opponent can defend and counterattack by developing a piece, and then you need to move the piece again. Try to verify for each move: is the field you are moving to not a good ...


1

It is interesting that you identify this as a weakness. It is often not clear initially on which file the Rooks belong. It becomes clearer as the pawn structures take shape, in particular when you can see which pawn breaks will lead to an open file. One question to ask yourself is, if I open this file, will my rooks be able to use it as an avenue for attack? ...


1

In Michael Steans excellent book "Simple Chess" he introduces the idea of each stable Pawn structure having the "capacity" to support a certain number of pieces. If your pawns lack capacity, your pieces will feel cramped. They lack mobility and "step on each others toes". Obviously you should work to bring about exchanges. Perhaps even more importantly, if ...


1

I find Secrets of Pawnless Endings (Gambit, 2002) by John Nunn (pages 49 to 69) to be the ultimate reference about the KQvKR ending. All steps needed to force Philidor's 1777 position are described precisely, each position showing how to reduce to a previously seen position. The book of course covers stalemate cases (which are all obvious) and what I call "...


1

There is more on the condition to consider The King and Rook have to be on the same rank, otherwise Pam-Krabbe castling would be possible. Pam-Krabbe castling is basically a vertical castling, where the king would castle with a promoted pawn. This is not allowed anymore.


1

Here is a problem I've made that demonstrates how the rook can move through squares that are attacked. The squares a1 and b1 are maximally attcked. If it were on a board, it would defintely frustate a few people, which is the exact point of this little excercise! [Title "Mate In Two Moves"] [FEN "8/8/8/8/pppbbp1r/nr2pppB/q2n2Pp/R3K2k w Q - 0 1&...


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