67

It is totally normal, and actually, I would consider it good sportsmanship, but that is a bit relative to your level of play. Among masters, if someone blunders even a piece, they know that their master opponent will have no problem converting, so to play on could be considered rude and a waste of time. That said, they have the right to, and if they do, you ...


52

Is it rude to ask my opponent to resign an online game when they have a lost endgame? Yes, it is rude, although you are in good company. In one Olympiad Victor Korchnoi is alleged to have asked his opponent - "Do you speak English?" When they said "Yes" he replied "Then please resign". I may be misquoting. He may not have said "please" :-) Strictly ...


45

From my experience (small to medium central European Opens), offering a handshake without words is a commonly accepted form of resignation. The handshake is not part of any official rules. However, there is some reasoning behind it: You shake hands after the game ended (just as you do before it starts). So you only start extending your hand once that end ...


35

Brian Towers answered the question, but to help you understand why people don't resign, I recommend you watch this lecture by GM Finegold Blunders, with GM Ben Finegold. The gist of it is: Never resign, and look for resources no matter how bad your position is. And when you are winning, don't let your guard down.


33

No, this is not possible. for example move the piece, don't press the clock and then resign? In particular, that loophole is explicitly covered by the rules: 6.2.1 During the game each player, having made his move on the chessboard, shall stop his own clock and start his opponent’s clock (that is to say, he shall press his clock). This “completes” the ...


31

It's always rude to ask your opponent to resign. They should resign of their own accord once they're convinced that you're overwhelmingly likely to win the game. In my case, that always meant you'd have to convince me that you knew how to play the endgame in question and that both of us knew how you would win it. If your opponent hasn't resigned yet, it ...


31

As a general rule, if something is not done out of malice then it's not bad etiquette in my book (especially if it's allowed in the rules). So if all you do is play on in a lost position, then I don't see how anyone could complain; for instance, should a novice not be allowed to play on until checkmate? That would be absurd, no matter who said novice were ...


25

The first thing to note is that the FIDE Laws of Chess are silent on this. Resignation at any time in any situation is allowed and immediately ends the game: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. Other methods of losing are qualified in some way. For example, checkmate is only valid if the ...


22

Honestly it's rude to ask your opponent to resign in any position. The one exception may be them deliberately letting their clock run to 0 in a completely lost position, but in this case they're being deliberately malicious and you can't really hope to reason with them. Even though you're absolutely justified in thinking your opponent should resign, that ...


21

Yes, resigning a clearly lost game is indeed considered good behaviour. Sometimes not resigning is considered unsportsmanlike! It makes no difference on the result of the game whether you resign, are checkmated, or lose on time - a loss is a loss. In any rating system I've ever heard of, the method of losing doesn't make a difference. It's just that people ...


19

is it legal to reply with resignation when a draw is offered? Of course. This is all that the FIDE Laws of Chess has to say about resignation: 5.1.2 The game is won by the player whose opponent declares he resigns. This immediately ends the game. You can resign at any time during the game. It doesn't even need to be your turn. I have done this. I once ...


18

If I remember correctly, they either just sign the scoresheet or stop the clock first and then sign the scoresheet to indicate that they resigned. There is no handshake, and they do not speak to each other since the WCC2006 controversy. Here are two examples: Candidates Tournament 2014, Rd. 13 (Kramnik-Topalov 1-0), Norway Chess 2014, Rd. 6 (Topalov-Kramnik ...


15

You might know that you are playing a game that is already decided, but your opponent might not. Your opponent might not realize that the position you now have is a won endgame. Even if your opponent realizes it, she might not be convinced that you know that you already won and that you know what mistakes you need to avoid in order to win. So they believe ...


14

It's not bad etiquette, and further, many people think(and I partially join them) that resigning and draw agreements in chess should be forbidden. Reasoning - it's necessary to expand chess popularity as sports and to make it possible for non-chess-players to follow competitions and games. It happens so often - two GMs playing - one resigns and half of ...


14

To follow up on Brian's answer about war, I think competitive Real Time Strategy games are a very close analogy. For those unfamiliar: In these games players typically build up bases, then build armies, then those armies fight. If one army has a decisive where the victor has enough troops remaining, they go destroy the other person's base and all their ...


13

Why is it acceptable to resign? Chess has its origins as a war game. It was used to model war and perhaps to play a part in the training of generals. In war it is standard practice to surrender when it is clear that defeat is unavoidable. This is an obvious humane thing to do to minimize loss of life. Crossing over into chess as the model of war this ...


11

Resigning is considered polite in an obvious losing position among advanced players i.e. players that won't make an error, with a significant material/positional advantage and will almost positively win the game so there is no real point in playing it out. However, among beginners and less talented players, I would personally advocate never resigning as ...


11

In the USA, we have to notate our games. This would likely prevent issues where an opponent claimed a draw fraudulently. I played tournament chess for years and never knew of a single instance of the sort of fraud and cheating that you mention. (My point is that I have not had to deal with it so others may have more germane experience.) EDIT - good ...


11

Because he is losing the Rh8, and at that level, that is an EASY win. It is also worse than that as mate is coming in a few moves. Even without the almost immediate mate, being down a pawn and an exchange is a lot of material. By the way, although black did not take it, white did offer a queen sac on move 24.Qg7, but had it been taken, a new queen would ...


10

It's more sportsman-like to resign than to play on. When you play on in the face of an inevitable loss, in effect you are saying to your opponent "I don't think you're good enough to be able to beat me, even with an extra queen." Think about it for a while, wouldn't you find that sort of arrogance offensive? By resigning, you signify your respect for the ...


10

Why don't you resign instead? It's a question that looks like it has an obvious answer: because I'm winning! But that begs the question "who cares?" Let the game end. What happens? Your record goes up by 1 win, and you get some rating points. In the end, other than the sheer enjoyment of the game, that's the only real consequence. A few bits in a ...


10

You have no way to know what your opponent was thinking. Maybe the move was intended to be a brilliant queen sacrifice, but then he/she realized the flaw in the plan. Or maybe it was just a slip of the mouse! If it had been my blunder, I would probably have waited to see if you actually took the queen or decided it must be a trap and ignored it, but ...


10

Note that the core game of chess would be almost unchanged if it ended with the actual capture of a king rather than checkmate. In a sense, checkmate itself is a from of resignation, one that is written into the rules of the game. The game ends when the king would be lost on the next move. Resignation is just an extension of the logic of ending the game when ...


9

It is good sportsmanship and your opponent would be very happy. On the other hand, you do not have to do that and are permitted to keep playing without dishonor. Indeed I saw an expert toss a queen against a lower rated player and did not resign. In the end, after a long endgame he managed to win. He kept improving his position and won some material ...


8

The FIDE laws of chess contain two parts: Basic rules of play (Sections 1-5) and Competition rules (Sections 6-12). The first part is what defines how the pieces move, when the game ends, and so on. These rules indeed allow players to resign at any point before the end of the game, so you can resign right before you would give a checkmate, but not after you ...


8

It depends on your level. At the beginner level, most people recommend not resigning and instead playing until there is either checkmate or a stalemate. If you're a beginner playing against other beginners, blunders are so common that even being a queen behind doesn't guarantee losing. Once you get past the beginner level, an easy way is to ask yourself if ...


8

Most sports have a numerical end. A game of basketball ends after 4 quarters and the team with the highest score wins and a game of tennis, which does not have a time constraint, is decided when a player wins the best out of three sets. To end a game of chess, however, requires either checkmate or stalemate. Unlike other sports, there is no linear path ...


7

1) Unwarranted resignations happen on occasion even in tournament play, sometimes even in a won position. If your student does this in an instructional game, it's a teachable moment. In the present game, you might learn too: saying "haha, now I get a free rook" during the game is distracting the opponent, which is against the rules whether or not you in ...


7

The correct decision here is to send the players back to finish their game. There's a very good rule of thumb that TD's use in situations like this - if the two players don't agree on the result of the game (there's no "meeting of the minds" between the players), they should go back to the board and continue the game. It's up to the TD to set the clock ...


7

Resigning, as mentioned by Arlen, is a respectful act. It states that you believe it is no longer worth your time and their time to play out the game. It is recommended that newcomers not resign as often as the experts appear to do. I would like to add to that answer with more of an explanation why. Often the reason is "the other person might make a ...


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