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20 votes

Why do some openings have Indian in their name?

In Indian Chess, the game that was played in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries in India (not to be confused with its ancestor Chaturanga), the rules allowed no castle, and double-step pawn moves ...
Evargalo's user avatar
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15 votes
Accepted

Why do some openings have Indian in their name?

In many cases, openings are named after a notable first master game (or games). The master or country does not necessarily must have contributed to it. Apparently in the case of Indian openings (1. d4 ...
user1583209's user avatar
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13 votes

Why does anybody allow the Queen's Indian Defense?

White can't force black to go for a setup with ...d5, so it's not a given that 3.g3 will end up in the Catalan. In particular there is 3...c5, trying to transpose to a Benoni where the g3 variations ...
RemcoGerlich's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why isn’t Black forced to prevent e4 in this Queen’s Indian Game?

There is a huge difference here, and that is first, that you will get the bishop pair for white's big center, but also that your Bf6 is beautifully placed for they typical black move in the Queen's ...
PhishMaster's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does anybody allow the Queen's Indian Defense?

The issue is in committing to 3.g3 a move earlier. Then if Black plays 3...d5, White must play the Catalan (with 3.Nf3, he still had the option to play a different line in the Queen's Gambit). Or take ...
Inertial Ignorance's user avatar
3 votes
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Top players move order when playing QGD?

There is no real objective answer, both are playable at any level. Such variations in move order are decided primarily according to roughly 3 common criteria: a) Comfort zone of the player: which ...
Ellie's user avatar
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2 votes

Why is 7...Ne4 8.Bd2 such a popular line in this variation of the Queen's Indian Defence?

White wants to avoid doubled c-pawns and all of the moves you mention, Qc2, Qd3, Nxe4 and Bd2 achieve this. As you note, Nxe4, exchanging knights tends to be drawish, so is not what most white ...
user1583209's user avatar
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2 votes

Why does anybody allow the Queen's Indian Defense?

Shortly: I am an experienced Catalan player and choose 3.g3 order exactly to disallow Queen's Indian. Considering my knowledge and practice I can say that most of White players move 3. g3 for the same ...
TaskerBliss's user avatar
1 vote

What would be some great books that clarify the positional concepts of the Queen's Indian Defence from the Black side?

In my library I've "The Queen's Indian" by Yrjölä-Tella, Gambit Publications, 2003. The lines showed might be outdated now but it seems to me that the authors have made an effort of explaing ...
Andrea Mori's user avatar
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1 vote

Why does anybody allow the Queen's Indian Defense?

The QID isnt really anything to worry about. Most white players are more worried about the NID or the KID and are probably happy to see a QID. White scores 54% and SF gives .37 to white so white is ...
Savage47's user avatar
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1 vote

Why does White fianchetto the light square Bishop in QID

Given that white's main light squares defender around the king (after white castles king side) is its Bishop on g2 which at some point in the game can be exchanged with Black's bishop on b7, isn't ...
user1583209's user avatar
  • 20.8k
1 vote

Why do some openings have Indian in their name?

In "Indian" defenses, Black holds back his center pawns, especially his d-pawn, against a White 1. d4. This "Indian" style is in contrast to the European style of opposing 1. d4 with 1. ... d5, and 1. ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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