9

Yes, it is still called the Queen's Gambit Declined. That's just the name of the system, regardless of the move order used to reach it. However, it is not the QGD before Black chooses to push 3...d5.


6

The same move order also occurred in game 2 (at least up to 9...Qa5). It's a good question that you're asking, though I'm afraid there's no intuitive answer in the way that you're looking for. Instead, these are very concrete lines well polished by computer analysis, which means the best way to understand a decision such as 7.dxc5 is to simply play through ...


6

The position after move 9 is the main tabya of the Tarrasch defense. Your feeling that Black is better, or even that he has egalized, is imprecise : White has no weakness, active pieces, and Black's isolani is a long term target. The position is playable for both sides, its evaluation somewhere in between = and +=. Actually, Kasparov himself stopped playing ...


6

It seems to be that the QGD is regaining some popularity at the top level due to theory advancing. I don't think that says anything about the overall popularity of the two openings though (i.e., including all players). The increase in engines' powers have made playing the semi-slav a very treacherous choice. There's a lot more that super GMs need to know ...


5

There were a select of games published played between AlphaZero and Stockfish 8, see e.g. here on chess24. Some of them were played without book and some with the TCEC opening book, which I reckon led to a bigger likelihood for the QGD to occur. Considering that QGD itself is an opening for black, how frequently they occurred in AlphaZero's games playing ...


5

7...dxc4 is absolutely just as good as 7...Ne4. Stockfish 10 (at depth 32) gives 7...dxc4 an evaluation of -0.31, while 7...Ne4 is 0.23. A difference of 118 games vs 96 games isn't a big deal and has very little weight in determining the objective strength of a move. So this is one of those cases where deciding which move to play is a matter of taste. EDIT -...


5

Welcome to the world of the Isolated Queen Pawn (IQP for shorts)! This is a special type of position which can be reached from quite a few openings (also with reversed colours); the Tarrasch variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined, as in your game, the 2. c3 Sicilian, the Caro Kann, to name a few. Just like playing a violent kingside attack with lots of ...


5

This really comes down to what you're comfortable with. Both the Benoni and the QGD are good options, precisely because of the reason you mention: a3 isn't really useful for White in those openings, so you'll be playing lines with a tempo up. According to chessgames.com, Black is already better. Which line (3... d5 or 3... c5) is better is just a matter of ...


5

White happens to have a couple of nice concrete plans in the particular QGD Exchange variation you mention (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5). One involves e3, f3, Nge2, and a break in the center with e4. The other is a minority attack on Black's a7-b7-c6-d5 pawn structure with b2-b4-b5. You will note that White's stats are much worse in the variation 1....


4

Short answer: In symmetric positions it's difficult to get an advantage if there's nothing concrete. In the Exchange Slav white only has an extra half-move against black's very solid position. Compare with the Exchange French which is even more drawish. In the Exchange variation of Queen's Gambit Declined on the other hand, there is a structural imbalance ...


4

It is hard to tell exactly without an exact line, but normally it has the idea of following with ...dxc4 (putting the enemy bishop on the c4 square), ...b5 (now kicking it away) and ...Bb7. This solves the annoying problem of placing the c8 bishop on a decent square


4

I guess you mean the game below and at the 7th-move: 7.Qa4+ doesn't win the bishop because black can reply with Nc6 blocking the check and defending the bishop. [title "Biel, Carlsen vs Navara 2018"] [fen ""] [startply "12"] 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 e6 4.Bg5 Bb4+ 5.Nc3 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 (7.Qa4+ Nc6) O-O 8.Rc1 dxc4 9.Bxc4 c5 10.dxc5 Nd7 11.O-O Nxc5 12....


4

In the various standard variations of QGD, the answers to this question are somewhat different, but you should keep in mind Black's main goals. Black's main problem is that they don't have enough good places for all of their bishops and knights. The worst piece is the light-square bishop, but the other minor pieces are also problematic. Hence Black's main ...


3

As @JossieCalderon pointed out, any opening could end up with three knights for one side. This would always require a knight promotion of some sort. Usually, knight promotions occur to Give check to the opponent immediately to move the king to another square or to save a tempo. Avoid a knight fork from the opponent, or give one of your own Avoid stalemate ...


3

Indeed, the line is relatively rare, but the move 3....a6 seems to become more and more popular the last couple of years. Even Magnus Carlsen has played it twice in blitz recently, against Aronian and Grischuk. The move 4.cxd5 is the most popular move and arguably the only way to fight for an advantage. After 4.Nf3, black has the choice to transpose to a ...


3

The Marshall is considered dubious since Black essentially just gives up full control over the center. For that reason, there is no move that would give Black absolute equality after 4. Nf3 There are probably good development schemes that would give Black a playable game, but there is no direct path to absolute equality. Heck, there's no direct path to ...


3

The Principle of Two Weaknesses is at work here, one weakness is easier to defend than two. Asymmetry, especially in pawn structure, benefits the player ahead in development, because there is usually available play on more parts of the board. The situation becomes more of a race, and the faster developed player will have an easier way to obtain an advantage....


3

There are a lot of different defenses to the Queen's Gambit Declined, but in most of them, you do not need to worry too much about white trying to take on c5, and holding it since it is very difficult to keep in most lines. I am going to post some basic lines that lead to different variations, and some comments about each. This material will give you a very ...


3

I think this is the game you mean, and it was on move 7. Qa4+, and Nc6 saves the bishop. Qa4 is a well-known line, and the second most popular move after 7. e3. This is a black defense to the QGD called the Ragozin Defense. It is considered a very active defense, and black gives away certain positional aspects in exchange for piece activity. Here are a few ...


3

In the game you linked, after 7 Bg2, 7... dc is almost a free pawn. (In particular, while white can always take the pawn back in QGA or open Catalan, they can't do so nearly as easily in this position.) It's true that black allows e4, and black also opens up the g2 diagonal for white, both of which are positional disadvantages for black. However, while ...


3

They reach the same position, so they have the same name. It wouldn't make sense to call the same position differently depending on the moves that lead to it. 1.f4 e5 2.e4 is a King's gambit, not a declined From's gambit. 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.cxd5 exd5 4.c4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e6 6.Nf3 is a Tarrasch Defence despite having started as a Caro-Kann


2

The exchange variation in the classical QGD can be viewed as theoretically favouring white because after the fourth move in your game, white has both his central pawns while black has only one. However, black now has a semi-open central file which he can use to control the centre through his rooks. Also, he has a queen side pawn majority and he can start ...


2

I suspect that a good try for white here is to go into Colle-Zukertort system: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colle_System#Colle.E2.80.93Zukertort_System Then 3...h6 is not only a tempo loss, but also a unpleasant weakness of the king side.


2

A suggestion : Boensch-Vaganian, 1983 Bring the Bishop to d6, move the kingside pawns forward, try to dominate square e4.


2

Your question(s) seem to be related to 1.d4 in general. People have nicely answered issues with the Isolated Q Pawn, so I'll touch on other topics. Compared to 1.e4 , queen's pawn openings do not attempt to take advantage of immediate complications in the center. In Roy Lopez, White is playing against e5 right from the beginning, move after move. King's ...


2

Be careful that you don't end up a tempo down in a known line, otherwise it is good to keep all your options open. h6 can benefit Black in giving luft to a castled king but overall it is a slight weakening of his position, so you should be encouraged to wait for Black to ask the Bishop it's intentions. Overall, unless you have a concrete reason to take the ...


2

It depends on your own tastes, but I'd recommend not taking. Taking after ...h6 is justified because it essentially costs Black a tempo (i.e., playing ...h6). If you take without provocation then no one's losing tempi, you're just making an exchange. If you really like trading on f6 then go ahead, but objectively you shouldn't have any advantage.


2

One of the possible reasons why 5.Bf4 has gained popularity at the very top-level, is because white seems to have difficulties obtaining an advantage after 5.Bg5. The critical variation is 5....h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.e3 Nbd7 8.Rc1 c5 9.dxc5 Nxc5 10.cxd5 g5!, which occured for the first time in Wojtaszek-Kramnik (2015). Moreover, black can also play 9....dxc4, which ...


1

12. a3 in this position is a very concrete move, and as such, the best way to understand its purpose is to play out a handful of the main variations with and without the a3 inclusion. If it's difficult to do that on your own, keep an engine on your side while you're doing your exploratory analysis. Short answer: a3 is not necessarily needed for white here, ...


1

2 main reasons: The orthodox defense typically goes for a ...c6 structure and avoids ...b6 + ...c5. This makes Bxf6 a more viable option for White due to the more closed nature of the game. So, ...h6 could just end up wasting a tempo by nudging White to make a somewhat favourable exchange. Note that it's fine for you to play Bxf6 against the Tartakower too, ...


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