10

Short answer 3.Qa4+ and 3.Bf4 are reasonnable enough moves but not dangerous for Black. 3.Nd2?! and 3.b4? are very dubious. 1. "Traditional line" I don't know why you name it that way, 3.Nf3 or 3.e4 are much more common than 3.Qa4+. By the way your "novelties" are certainly not that "new" either. The idea of 3.Qa4+ is to regain the pawn at once. Its ...


8

Of players who have been inside top ten it is Ponomariov who uses this opening the most often. Ivanchuk plays it too, but then again he plays most anything. And Nakamura played it a few times last year. You can do searches for free online at 365chess.com. Here is an example: http://www.365chess.com/search_result.php?search=1&p=1&m=4&n=109&...


8

Black can sometimes hold on to the Pawn if that is the goal. Black has to play an early a6 and b5. One possible variation is: [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 a6 4. e3 b5 Although Black will hold on to the extra C-Pawn, White can counterattack with a4, b3, and Nc3. Black has neglected development, and according to MegaBase 2012, White scores 60.6% ...


7

Queen's Gambit Accepted : how should White continue after 3.e3 Be6? [FEN ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3.e3 Be6 4. Na3!? seems good to me-Black would not be able to hold the c4 pawn. I would take c4 pawn with the knight and head for e5. The other knight can bolster him from f3 and there will always be threats to f7 or to Blacks light squared bishop with Ng5. ...


6

I suppose you have some source that claims 1.g4 is the best move from the diagram position, but which doesn't give any reason for it. I won't try to weigh in on whether it is in fact the best move here, but I will try to articulate a reason or two to play it. First I'll say that I don't think it's the tempo against the bishop that offsets the decreased king ...


6

I'm not sure which database you are looking at: I see 3.e4 as the second, not third, most popular choice on chess.com, though not by much: Here's what one author says about 3.Nf3: Throughout the history of the Queen’s Gambit Accepted, this has been White’s most popular move in this position. White does not hurry to win back the pawn that he has ...


6

Chess.com listed this as an inaccuracy because the engine is running at a limited depth, only looking at each move for a few seconds. When I put the position after 5...Bg4 into Stockfish, it gave an evaluation of +0.12 at 16 ply. But at 18 ply, the evaluation dropped to -0.38. Most likely if you had run the analysis at "maximum" (which I realize is locked ...


5

Unless you have a good reason, why would you block your own queen bishop and release tension on the important d5 square? The idea of the gambit is to intensify pressure on the d5 square. Volunteering yourself away by Nd2 is unusual.


5

The simplest reply for white is Bxc4 which gives white exactly what he wants, a central pawn majority with tempo because he got his d4 pawn in the center plus his bishop on C4 while black basically doesn't have any pieces or pawns off their starting squares. That said, a4 is probably also a good move as it makes b5 difficult for black. Note that c6 isn't a ...


5

At that point Black is simply equal and there is nothing you can do to change it ( you would do better to play e4 instead e3 but ...e5 still solves all of Black's problems ). If you wish to play e4 instead of e3 then you need the book Lars Schandorff-Playing the Queen's Gambit ( 2012!) and be sure to get the second edition ( first was in 2009 ). He covers ...


5

You can play 5. axb5 and transpose to the answers to this question (Queen's Gambit Accepted with black trying to defend the c file pawn with 4... Bd7).


5

There are ways to hold onto the pawn, but most of them leave Black with a dreadful position where his entire position is built around hanging onto the pawn. Moves like Be6, c6, b5, and Qa5 are examples of strategies that could be employed. In the Slav and Semi-Slav defenses, there are in fact a lot of variations in which black is able to comfortably (...


4

That's known as "D20 Queen's Gambit Accepted, 3.e4" The Queen's Gambit has two points: Develop the King's Bishop with tempo Take the center that black abandons in that regard, 3. e4 is the better move though masters play 3. e3 with nearly the same frequency. I wouldn't worry about the loss of the c pawn; the purpose of a gambit is to gain time. If you'...


4

Another reasonable continuation for white after 3. ... b5 is: [fen ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 b5 4.a4 c6 5.e3 This transposes into a position more commonly reached via the Slav move order. 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 dxc4 4.e3 b5 5.a4. Here you can find a lot more example games to look through. But still Black does not hold onto the pawn and instead gives ...


4

Doesn't that pretty much turn the opening into a real gambit? No. Black can now hold on to the c-file pawn since the usual trap (with Qf3) is no longer possible and b4 can be safely played by Black to prop up the c-file pawn. No he can not. White will regain the pawn and get huge advantage. Here are the most relevant lines, the rest can be easily found ...


4

I'm not an expert on this line, but one idea from "Study chess with Matthew Sadler" stuck in my mind: To play against the b7-bishop with f3 and e4. So that might be an objective for white. For black this is probably harder to archive, because the Nc3 is ready to jump into d5. But this Nc3 instead of Nd2 gives black a different target: The square c4. Say ...


4

A super-abridged guide to the QGA (Queen's Gambit Accepted) is that Black temporarily cedes the center with dxc4, and hopes to develop rapidly while White recovers the pawn (you'll want to look up some key lines where Black suffers because he is greedy and tries to hold on to the pawn; personally, I found it instructive to look at the main line of an ...


3

I play e3 because I prefer more positional play. I want to first improve my position before a possible e4. In a more closed game the loss of tempo is not very important. That said, e4 is perfectly playable. To me, this is a matter of style. I guess that most players who would play 3. e4 would play 1. e4


3

[fen ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 b5? 4. a4! Bd7? 5.axb5! Bxb5 6.Bxc4! Bxc4 7.Qxa4+ and White gets back the bishop with the advantage ( no matter what Black plays Qxc4 is White's next move ). Hopefully this answer helped. Best regards.


2

After giving the issue some thought I think White has better prospects with: [fen ""] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e3 b5 4. a4 Bd7 5. axb5 Bxb5 6. Nc3 * At the very least a tempo is won. If Black is not very careful as to where he retreats his Bishop he may very well lose material in addition to the c4 pawn which is doomed by all accounts.


2

Following from the last line: [StartPly "8"] [FEN ""] 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 b5 4.a4 Ba6 5.axb5 Bxb5 6.Nc3 {If black tries to defend the pawn:} Ba6 7.Qf3 c6 {The only reply that doesn't instantly lose the rook.} 8.Rxa6 Nxa6 9.Qxc6+ Qd7 10.Qxa8+ Qd8 11.Qc6+ Qd7 12.Qxa6 Killing him.


2

I was looking thoroughly for the omission of ...c5 in many repertoire books ( Semko & Sakaev-Queen's Gambit Declined 3rd ed., Iakov Neishtadt-The Queen's Gambit Accepted, James Rizzitano-How to beat d4,Raetsky & Chetverik-Starting Out The Queen's Gambit Accepted ) and found absolutely nothing about the pros and cons of delaying this move! This is ...


2

One transposition white can try is from the French Exchange variation (if you know your opponent plays the French). [FEN ""] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 4. c4 dxc4 (4... Nf6) 5. Bxc4 It transposes to the variation 1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e3 e5 4. Bxc4 exd4 5. exd4 from this question. In the French move order, clever black players won't take the pawn on ...


2

If you are a beginner, studying tactics, general opening principles and some strategy first will be more useful than learning any opening. Basically the idea of the queen's gambit for white is to remove a central pawn (the one on d5) and then to occupy the center (general opening principle). As with any opening theory it does not stop at the second move, ...


1

As was said already: "If you are a beginner, studying tactics, general opening principles and some strategy first will be more useful than learning any opening." I would add End Games to that important list, and modify the opening principles to include you being able to play "the first 4-6 moves as black against anything comfortably". This is not learning ...


1

A good game between equally matched players. 3. e4 is more common and is one of the points of the gambit - you gain more space. You're going to use an extra move to get it to e4 on move 8. Might as well do it on move 3. 9. dxe5 allows a series of trades that sucks the life out of the game. I think 9. d5 is slightly stronger and is what I expected you to ...


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