70

It's checkmate in 20 moves. White's queens circle around the board giving checks, and Black interposes horizontally/vertically moving pieces. Black only has one choice because the other piece is pinned from the previous check. That goes well, until the pawn needs to move sideways: [FEN "3Q4/7Q/3rp3/2rkr3/2rrr3/7K/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qb7+ Rc6 2. Qa5+...


27

The simple and obvious answer is that it all depends on the position of black's pawns and king. In general the further up the board the pawns the better for black provided the king is in contact with the pawns, preferably in front of them. Worth pointing out that the position you give is winning for white because the pawns aren't far enough forward. From ...


25

If White can get the Black king to the first rank, then it will not be fast enough to catch the g-pawn from promoting. White starts by playing 1. Qg5, and after 1...Kh7 2. Qf6 Kg8 3. Qh6, the White queen can simply imitate the Black king's movements until she can start forcing the king down towards the first rank. [FEN "7k/8/8/8/6p1/4QpPb/5PpP/6K1 w - -...


13

I'm not sure about the fastest checkmate, but this should be the general procedure: Then Black After


12

[Title "White plays and wins (note the position after 2 Kg6)"] [FEN "4N2k/8/6PK/q7/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 0"] 1. g7+ Kg8 2. Kg6 Qb6+ 3. Nf6+ Qxf6 4. Kxf6 Kh7 5. Kf7 1-0 If Black stops 3 Nf6# with Qf5(g5,h5)+ then 3 Kxh5 and the Ne8 still holds the Pg7 so White soon wins. The bottom edge of the board barely prevents Black from turning the ...


10

First of all, White wins in the diagram you provide, although it's not obvious at a glance how. White plays Qf2 first to stop the king from advancing. Black can't just sit there forever because the White king will eventually eat that a-pawn and come back, so they have to play h4, and then another pawn move. If Black plays g3, White responds with Qf3, and now ...


10

The fundamental principle in king-and-pawn endings is that you want to get your king in front of your pawn(s). If your king is behind your pawn then your opponent can block with their king much more easily. Therefore 2.Kf1 is a mistake, because it allows the white king to get in front of the pawns and also attack the black pawns. Whether it is a game losing ...


9

There are actually two zones, depending on which side of the pawn the black king is. If it's already in the corner, the zone is small: If the black king on the other side (towards the center), the zone is larger. The white queen can force the king to stand in front of the pawn, giving the white king an extra tempo to reach the 'small' zone above. (This also ...


8

My question concerns the Queen+pawn versus Queen endgame. Assuming that the pawn is on its initial square (second rank for white, seventh rank for black), are all these endgames objectively drawn? Second of all, what is the best strategy for the player with the material advantage to aim for a win? Emphasis above are mine, and since you have 2 questions I ...


7

This max-DTZ position is mate in 8, but probably also a dead-end because it seems hard to improve starting here. [FEN "7q/4q1q1/8/8/3q2Q1/1K6/8/1k6 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qf5+ Qde4 2. Qf1+ Qe1 3. Qd3+ Ka1 4. Qa6+ Qa5 5. Qxa5+ Qa3+ 6. Qxa3+ Kb1 7. Qa2+ Kc1 8. Qc2#


6

According to the Nalimov Endgame Tablebase: http://www.k4it.de/?topic=egtb&lang=en this position is a win in 40 moves for black, if black promotes for a knight to block the upcoming avalanche of checks. However if black promotes for a queen it's a draw.


6

The best I could come up with is 7 moves, I don't believe it could take much longer, because with 4 queens there's not as much freedom as with 2, I cannot put black king in the middle of the board when capturing black queens while keeping king in check: 3q4/q7/q7/q7/8/8/8/k1K4Q w - - 0 1 And I made it nice as you asked -- the first move it not a capture! =)...


5

It would be very helpful if you would post a couple of those games you mentioned that you gave up perpetual check. I would say, "no", there are no stock positions that are meant to avoid perpetual check (at least I cannot think of any now that I would call "common"). You just have to be careful, and be aware of king safety. Sometimes, you just cannot avoid ...


5

This is given by Karsten Muller for Chessbase.


5

The pawns can indeed be stopped. The problem here is that White has barely tried at all! For instance, after 2.Qh7+ Kd2 3.Qb1, the pawns can go no further: against ...e2+, White can go Kf2 and against ...f2, Kg2 followed by Qf1 should be enough. 2.Qh1 could be an even simpler alternative, preventing the king from marching forward while also preventing ...e2 (...


4

This page claims that the longest DTM in this type of endgame is 182 moves. 8/4k3/8/Q7/8/7P/P7/q1K5 w - - 0 1 1. Kc2 Qd4 2. Qe1+ Kf7 3. Qf1+ Kg7 4. Qg2+ Kh8 5. Qa8+ Kh7 6. Qb7+ Kh6 7. Qc6+ Kh5 8. Qe8+ Kg5 9. Qg8+ Kh6 10. Qe6+ Kh7 11. Kb3 Qd3+ 12. Kb4 Qd2+ 13. Kb5 Qd3+ 14. Qc4 Qf5+ 15. Kb6 Qf2+ 16. Kb7 Qf3+ 17. Kc7 Qa3 18. Kb6 Kh8 19. Qd4+ Kh7 20. Qd7+ Kg6 ...


4

According to Wikipedia: According to Reuben Fine and Pal Benko, this ending is a draw unless the pawn is a bishop pawn or a central pawn (i.e. king pawn or queen pawn) and the pawn is in the seventh rank and is supported by its king. If the defending king can get in front of the pawn, the game is a draw; otherwise it is best for the defender to ...


4

This ending is a draw unless the pawn is a bishop pawn or a central pawn and the pawn is in the seventh rank and is supported by its king. If the defending king can get in front of the pawn, the game is a draw; otherwise it is best for the defender to keep his king far away from the pawn. The defender should keep checking until he runs out of check, and ...


4

They may as well try, since Q vs R is extremely difficult to win (even disregarding skewer tactics). The example of RB vs R is a great similar example, as it is a theoretical draw, but extraordinarily difficult to draw. There are numerous examples of top grandmasters being unable to convert Q vs R. As to a computer vs human- this was tested in 1978 in a ...


4

After fiddling around for a while with the Syzygy endgame tablebase, I found this position: [Title "KQ vs. KPP, white is not in check"] [FEN "3Q4/8/8/2p4K/8/8/2kp4/8 w - - 0 1"] According to the tablebase, it's mate in 105 against best play by White, which starts with either Qa8 or Kg6. White can't stop promotion without sacrificing the ...


3

I analyzed your position with Stockfish 11 ("Stockfish_20011801_x64_modern" to be exact) to a depth of 78 and it returned the following line as the best continuation. 6k1/8/4qp1p/7P/6P1/5P2/6K1/Q7 w - - 0 1 1. Qa8+ Kf7 2. Qb7+ Kg8 3.Qb8+ Kf7 4. Qb1 Qe2+ 5. Kg3 Qe5+ 6. Kf2 Qh2+ 7. Ke3 Qe5+ 8. Qe4 Qc5+ 9. Ke2 Qb5+ 10. Kf2 Qb2+ 11. Kg3 Qa1 12. Qc4+ ...


3

The 7-piece tablebase says that the position without the pawn on h6 is draw, so I believe this position is also a draw (by perpetual check). A typical winning attempt in queen+pawn vs queen endgames is to find a position where white can block a check with his queen while at the same time giving check. This is not possible here since the black king is ...


3

Black seems to be able to get away with a draw by perpetual check. The usual way for White to escape that, is to advance the pawn, or interpose his/her own queen while giving check (thereby forcing the exchange of queens). The latter is impossible because black's king is well protected. The former is impossible as well, as long as black remembers to give ...


3

Theoretically yes, as a practical matter (for humans), no. What is known is that a pawnless position cannot be won (barring unusual positional circumstances) if one side has an advantage of a bishop or knight, but it can be won if one side has the advantage of a rook (or a queen versus a rook). The "old" wisdom is that three minor pieces are worth about a ...


3

Of course, letting the White king be in check at the beginning seems to be a reasonable approach. Here is a position with a Black pawn on the fifth rank (its fourth rank): [Title "KQ vs KPP: White to move loses"] [FEN "Q7/8/8/5p2/8/8/4pk2/3K4 w - - 0 1"] It is not unique: here is another one: [Title "KQ vs KPP: White to move loses&...


3

The queen is not usually assigned a value of 8 pawns, rather often between 9 and 10 pawns. Of course the question still stands, assuming this roughly equal material balance who has the edge? Let's consider two scenarios how the position could simplify: One is the queen sacrifices itself against a knight, or gets won by a knight fork for a knight. In this ...


2

In this particular endgame, there are no mutual-zugzwang-positions. An overview over the positions is at http://chess.jaet.org/cgi-bin/mzugs


2

Yes, all KQvK positions are won under these conditions (no stalemate, no capture). The same holds for KRvK. The only possibilities for such basic endgames not to be won under your conditions would be: a piece has too few square available and can be captured by the black king (not immediately but in the next move) white on the move cannot avoid stalemate (...


2

Stockfish with tablebases gives flat 0.00 so it seems highly likely to be a draw. A problem for White is they can't even take the c6 pawn with the king, 1.Kc7 Qh2+ 2.Kxc6 is a draw. So since Black can just keep giving checks and force the white king on awkward squares this seems hard to ever be winning. (especially since Black can always threaten to pick up ...


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