16

In the vast majority of the cases, an ending of Q+R vs. Q should be winning. However, some exceptions exist, for instance: [FEN "6RK/7Q/5q2/8/8/8/8/3k4 w - - 0 1"] 1.Qg7 Qh4+ 2.Qh7 Qf6+ 3.Rg7 Qd8+ 4.Qg8 Qh4+ 5.Rh7 Qf6+ In case you want to check whether your game was winning or not and how to win it, you can consult a tablebase, for example the ...


11

I have looked at tablebases but the moves are somewhat bizarre That's the problem with tablebases; they're efficient but they can't 'play' human chess. This particular endgame is one-sided enough that it's almost never required to play the best move. Just drive the opponent's king to the edge of the board, as you would do with king+queen vs. king; just be ...


11

This is one of the well known endgames and the side with the queen almost always (92% positions) wins, although some wins take more than 50 moves with perfect play. See the solution for your position here by entering your position into the diagram. I must point out that every move has been taken into account and every possible continuation has been ...


10

This is called perpetual check and it is a draw. There is no extra rule for perpetual check because the draw can be claimed by invoking the three-fold repetition rule. (You said positions were not repeating, but if you cannot escape from a perpetual check, they will repeat sooner or later). If you carefully go through the game, you will probably spot a ...


9

Always keep your K and Q on opposite colour squares, or have your K diagonally 1 gap away from the N, so that you will never be forked. Beyond that, just as Glorfindel said, fork the N if it's allowed or drive opponent's K to the edge and checkmate.


9

There are actually two zones, depending on which side of the pawn the black king is. If it's already in the corner, the zone is small: If the black king on the other side (towards the center), the zone is larger. The white queen can force the king to stand in front of the pawn, giving the white king an extra tempo to reach the 'small' zone above. (This also ...


8

My question concerns the Queen+pawn versus Queen endgame. Assuming that the pawn is on its initial square (second rank for white, seventh rank for black), are all these endgames objectively drawn? Second of all, what is the best strategy for the player with the material advantage to aim for a win? Emphasis above are mine, and since you have 2 questions I ...


6

This max-DTZ position is mate in 8, but probably also a dead-end because it seems hard to improve starting here. [FEN "7q/4q1q1/8/8/3q2Q1/1K6/8/1k6 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qf5+ Qde4 2. Qf1+ Qe1 3. Qd3+ Ka1 4. Qa6+ Qa5 5. Qxa5+ Qa3+ 6. Qxa3+ Kb1 7. Qa2+ Kc1 8. Qc2#


6

The best I could come up with is 7 moves, I don't believe it could take much longer, because with 4 queens there's not as much freedom as with 2, I cannot put black king in the middle of the board when capturing black queens while keeping king in check: 3q4/q7/q7/q7/8/8/8/k1K4Q w - - 0 1 And I made it nice as you asked -- the first move it not a capture! =)...


6

The best resource I know for endgame statistics remains the ICGA endgame stats. The spreadsheet posted there contains pretty much all endgames up to 6 men. So for example KQKR is found in row 27 (assuming White has KQ), with the following percentages: wtm btm W win 99.01 65.51 draw 0.80 5.83 B win 0.19 28.65 So as long as White has the ...


5

It would be very helpful if you would post a couple of those games you mentioned that you gave up perpetual check. I would say, "no", there are no stock positions that are meant to avoid perpetual check (at least I cannot think of any now that I would call "common"). You just have to be careful, and be aware of king safety. Sometimes, you just cannot avoid ...


5

This is given by Karsten Muller for Chessbase.


5

According to Wikipedia, citing Fundamental Chess Endings, such endgames are wins for the side with the queen, unless there's an immediate draw or win for the side with the rook. However, such endgames are complex enough that even a grandmaster may not necessarily win before 50 moves.


5

According to the Nalimov Endgame Tablebase: http://www.k4it.de/?topic=egtb&lang=en this position is a win in 40 moves for black, if black promotes for a knight to block the upcoming avalanche of checks. However if black promotes for a queen it's a draw.


4

According to Wikipedia: According to Reuben Fine and Pal Benko, this ending is a draw unless the pawn is a bishop pawn or a central pawn (i.e. king pawn or queen pawn) and the pawn is in the seventh rank and is supported by its king. If the defending king can get in front of the pawn, the game is a draw; otherwise it is best for the defender to ...


4

This ending is a draw unless the pawn is a bishop pawn or a central pawn and the pawn is in the seventh rank and is supported by its king. If the defending king can get in front of the pawn, the game is a draw; otherwise it is best for the defender to keep his king far away from the pawn. The defender should keep checking until he runs out of check, and ...


3

The 7-piece tablebase says that the position without the pawn on h6 is draw, so I believe this position is also a draw (by perpetual check). A typical winning attempt in queen+pawn vs queen endgames is to find a position where white can block a check with his queen while at the same time giving check. This is not possible here since the black king is ...


3

Black seems to be able to get away with a draw by perpetual check. The usual way for White to escape that, is to advance the pawn, or interpose his/her own queen while giving check (thereby forcing the exchange of queens). The latter is impossible because black's king is well protected. The former is impossible as well, as long as black remembers to give ...


3

According to theory, this endgame is won for the Q+R side. Note that you can afford a queen exchange, since K+R still wins against a lone K. You should manage winning it (or reducing it by Q exchange) in less than 50 full moves which gives your oppenent the opportunity to claim a draw.


3

Theoretically yes, as a practical matter (for humans), no. What is known is that a pawnless position cannot be won (barring unusual positional circumstances) if one side has an advantage of a bishop or knight, but it can be won if one side has the advantage of a rook (or a queen versus a rook). The "old" wisdom is that three minor pieces are worth about a ...


2

This page http://kirill-kryukov.com/chess/longest-checkmates/longest-checkmates-sorted-by-length.shtml claims longest DTM in this type of endgame to be 182. Records for DTC/DTZ are not provided and I was not able to find any... DTC in this case occurs at 173, which is pretty high and a good estimate for a possible record holder (given the max. DTM at 182). ...


2

Yes, all KQvK positions are won under these conditions (no stalemate, no capture). The same holds for KRvK. The only possibilities for such basic endgames not to be won under your conditions would be: a piece has too few square available and can be captured by the black king (not immediately but in the next move) white on the move cannot avoid stalemate (...


2

In this particular endgame, there are no mutual-zugzwang-positions. An overview over the positions is at http://chess.jaet.org/cgi-bin/mzugs


1

The simple answer to your question is yes. In fact the same is true of a king and rook versus king, the most basic mating material. That's why having an extra pawn in an ending is so valuable, since even if all the other pawns were swapped off, the lone remaining pawn could potentially be promoted to a queen (or even a rook) for a subsequent checkmate.


1

As you said, this is a very general guideline, but looking back it has served me well in practical play. Note that by "checking from the diagonals", the pattern I have seen is that the queen maintains a stable circuit on a diagonal but the checks themselves are usually horizontal or vertical. I think it's because the checks from a diagonal allow the queen ...


1

How did you run the game? Did you run it by a fixed-depth? How much time did you give to the engine? I assume that you gave the engine either too little time or a fixed depth. In this case, the engine might not know the shortest way for a mate, because to the engine any move that doesn't lose the queen is the same. It only starts moving the king, when it ...


1

The weaker side cannot win the pawn, nor has a perpetual check nor can play on stalemate. Is there any drawing position left with all these conditions? I will answer this with a no, and for a reason that's more general than the KQPKQ scenario you're specifically interested in. But ultimately, whether the answer to your question is yes or no comes ...


1

According to the tablebase here, this position is a draw. Of course, with the open position, Black threatens perpetual check with any free move. [FEN "3k1q2/8/8/8/8/8/5P2/3KQ3 w - - 0 1"]


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible