New answers tagged

5

It's hard to prove with 100% certainty, but White will very likely win with optimal play. An advantage over +5 is way too much. There are some theoretically drawn endgames where Stockfish claims one side has a very large advantage, but this position isn't one of them. There are too many pieces and pawns still on the board, and they are able to move around ...


13

When a chess engine shows an evaluation of a position, there are typically 3 possible values, all of which are based on the engine's attempt to simulate perfect play for both sides: (1) If the engine sees a forced checkmate [meaning, when one side plays perfectly, no matter what the other side does, the winning side can checkmate], it will indicate how many ...


1

An improvement for n=4, building on Rewan Demontay's answer: [Title "n=4, 26 pieces"] [FEN "2Rnr3/PP1PP1PP/RKQ3rk/7B/5n2/6Bb/pp1pp1p1/3NN2q w - - 0 1"] The trick is to replace some pawns by knights or rooks to keep the position legal with less necessary captures. This version has more pieces and less pawns, so I think building a proof ...


12

White is a piece up and has a completely winning position. Black could try to create some counterplay profitting from the fact that White's pieces are a bit uncoordinated right now. But realistically, any decently skilled player should be able to convert this position into a win for White. Finally, note that there's no threshold for which positions can be ...


-3

If black has perfect play and white doesn't, black can draw or even win. But if white has perfect play, chanses are low a draw will occur and white will probably win. Conclusion, probably no draw and white will probably win


3

Sorry Hauke, but I can't get a headache this time. I've already commissioned n=1 n=2, an n=3 over on the Puzzling Stack Exchange. However, here the positions from the accepted answers for reference. The way I see it, I technically am the one the who got the gears rolling that produced them. Thus, I "found" them in my archives. Either way, I've beat ...


4

After playing around in Lichess's analysis pagel, I found a mate in 10. Throwing the moves into chess.com's analysis page provides further confirmation. It has a few wholly unique lines, and some dualed ones, making it reminiscent of a chess problem, per @Hauke Reddmann's above comment. [FEN ""] [Title "#10 After 3 Moves"] 1. e4 d5 2. h3 ...


1

After 13.Rf2?? 0-0! 14.Nxd6 (what else?) Qxf2+ white simply looses material. 13.Kh1 avoids that problem and wins. In the midst of a skirmish it is pointless to ponder over principles. You have to calculate the line to the end and then evaluate the position. The principles other have laid down for you are helpful to come to the right idea quickly, but not for ...


2

I am not very good at puzzle rush, but in principal it can be that 6 months are simply not enough to develop a complex skill. It is also not uncommon, that progress happens "in jumps", this has happened to me and was reported by others. You may try to give you another 6 months and then see what happens. Keep in mind, that puzzle rush was invented ...


1

Theme: Pin Illustrated points: Creating pin - Method 2: Attacking piece and the piece to be pinned are in one line, lure the third piece to the same line. Even absolutely pinned piece can move (though its mobility is restricted to the pinning line). Puzzle: [Title "Adapted from Schatz vs. Giegold, Hof (1928)"] [FEN "7k/pb2q3/1p3p2/2prp1p1/...


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