68

For the same reason the Tour de France is still a thing even if you could perform much better on a motorbike. Most chess enthusiasts didn't stop playing chess after noticing there's some other person whose rating is 1000 points higher than theirs, and won't stop because there's a machine 1000 stronger than that person. A good amount of chess players don't ...


65

The answer is very simple. A 6 year old child does not have an adult brain. It has the very immature, underdeveloped brain of a 6 year old. It has a short attention span and struggles to sit still for 5 minutes let alone spend 5 minutes on just one move. A few years ago I was chief arbiter for three junior tournaments held at the same time. I got one of the ...


49

Stack Exchange has a site dedicated to medical sciences. If you open that, you'll immediately see that on the right column there's a disclaimer that you won't find on any other Stack Exchange site. It's a bit long, so let me cut the most important parts: Stack Exchange Inc., and its sites including Medical Sciences Stack Exchange, is not a medical practice ...


44

Memorization is mostly a side effect, not the end goal. Top players can spend hours or days analyzing a single game to try to understand all of the instructive ideas. Memorization naturally flows from that.


28

An analogy often used here is to compare people to cars. Sure, cars can travel far faster than people like Usain Bolt, but that doesn't mean it's not entertaining to watch. When people watch players like Carlsen play chess, they're still watching the best humans in the world compete. Sure, being the best human no longer means much since there are stronger ...


25

There are two key things you need to do. The first is to know how to win a won endgame. You do that by studying endgames. That will do two important things for you. Apart from teaching you how to win a won endgame, it will also teach you to recognise which endgame positions are won, and which are drawn, despite your material advantage. That way when you are ...


22

I will try to answer this in a different manner, the way I understand this topic. Do we think on every signal, turn, fork when we drive? Do we think every time we eat food or walk on the street? The answer is yes, we do, but that thought process has moved to our reflexes to the extent that our brain does not let us know that it is doing a task (Thankfully!) ...


19

As much as people fear losing their jobs to machines that can do them better, Chess has seen the exact opposite take shape. That's because chess is a game. People enjoy playing it, and they enjoy watching other people play it. You can't really compare it to something like tilling the fields on a farm, where most people only care about the result and not the ...


18

I remember reading about this from one of GM Yasser Seirawan's books. What you want to do is: Pick a target Figure out how to attack it In this case the obvious target is the White pawn on a3. Why this pawn? Because it cannot move (a4 bxa4 wins the pawn). It stands to reason it's easier to attack something that cannot move. The a3-pawn is also not easy to ...


18

Addiction is a complicated and multi-faceted issue, and although dopamine plays a role it's far from the only important factor to consider; this also depends on which type of addiction we're dealing with. If we're talking about some sort of substance abuse (say, smoking, alcohol, hard drugs, etc.) then it's very common that a person becomes addicted to a ...


16

Are there such examples of torturous winning, where a grandmaster resists his urge to resign and lets the opponent take all of his pieces before he gets checkmated? No, there aren't, for the simple reason that that sort of behaviour would require both players to behave in an extremely childish manner and childish behaviour (e.g. "hope chess") is ...


15

20 years old is not that late to start. Any amount of time spent can help improve or maintain skills. Consider how much time you would like to spend and commit to it. Adjust to ensure you are enjoying your chess time. Easy to improve when having fun. An hour a day is fine to start. How you spend you time is also important. There is much good advice on ...


15

I would propose another plausible explanation: Time moves slower for children. I don't mean that in a gobbledey-gook spiritual sense but in the sense that the way humans experience temporality is relative to age. One Year for a 5 year old is 20% of their life. One year for a 20 year old person is a mere 5%. This transmutes down to smaller time periods too. A ...


14

There is a lot of argument over the 10,000 hour rule, which is said to be the amount of practice required to attain mastery of a skill. With today's tools, learning can be accelerated quite a bit. But even if we knock it down to 3000 hours it would take you nearly a decade at 1 hour a day. You say you love the game, so I say just go for it at an hour a ...


14

Playing slowly depends on the time format of the game, If you are playing a bullet time format and you play slow, then you will make very few moves and time will run out before you checkmate your opponent. If you are playing a 90mins game and you play fast, then you will probably get checkmated and spent the next 75 mins waiting for the next tournament round ...


13

I think what you are experiencing is fairly common. I find that I have games that i feel like an absolute legend, able to come up with creative solutions and just not making any mistakes.... then there other games where i hang pieces , miscalculate large trades and just can't get things to click. I think its partially due to fatigue though. If you are ...


13

Some suggestions, in addition to doing some tactics regularly (that's number one). Play at a time-control that is comfortable and not too fast, especially if you are playing blitz.(eg: switch to 5 min if you normally play 3 min); improvement is difficult anyway by playing only blitz games. Slow chess is needed at some point. Analyze your games and see what ...


12

Incentives and/or tactical ability tend to explain this. Sloppy chess against similar fast-moving and reckless competition (U600 - U1200 tourneys or sections within larger tournaments) produces flip-coin level results (or better, if you are slightly less sloppy) results and that's enough for a kid to feel they did okay (or worse yet, report back to the ...


11

First consider the difference between a 'truly' won position vs a 'theoretically winning' position. By that I mean - a position that is within your own abilities to convert to a win, in a way you can already see, vs a position that seems like it 'should be winning'. You see that stockfish says the position was -3.1, but at your rating level, -3.1 isn't '...


10

It's not as if top players sit down to memorize an old game. They don't spend time only memorizing, memorization is not a goal. But they study lots of games. Old games, new games, famous games, their own games. Constantly. And they have amazing memory so they remember these games, as a side effect of studying them, move by move. Of course there are also ...


9

I've never worked on tactics, openings and stuff in my youth, maybe it's cause of my problem This almost certainly the source of your problem. I am actually the guy you're referring to who got from 600 to 1900 in 2 years (in reality 1.25 years since I quit during school) ; my relatively fast improvement is ,and I'm convinced with a very small margin of ...


9

Arguably, chess is more exciting today because of computers rather than despite computers. Chess engines have had the side effect of eliminating adjournment from tournament play and generally led to faster time controls. Rapid (or even faster) games tend to be fairly exciting games, which has increased interest in the game. Also, the same rise in computer ...


8

Quite possible- this would be a special case of the Tetris Effect, as would what you described with your experience with Breath of the Wild. Anecdotally, someone I knew once played a lot of chess online and experienced similar effects. About 9 hours per day were spent on chess, roughly equally divided between play and study. This person experienced such ...


8

There is a 2006 paper "Training in chess: A scientific approach" by Dr. Gobet from the University of Nottingham, and Dr. Jansen from Carnegie Mellon University, which goal was "...to show how recent findings in cognitive psychology can be applied to improve techniques of chess training, teaching, and learning" It concludes that learning ...


7

Fatigue is likely a factor. It's common in older players like myself and with playing a lot in a short time. I'm worst in the afternoon games 3 & 4 of a one-day tournament. But it also may be akin to stage fright. I play best against familiar players in our club or online with friends. I miss many good shots in a tournament, against strangers or with ...


7

"Seems very unusual": source? Every time I've heard a good player (from club-competent to world-class) talking about his games, they were remarkably capable of precisely recalling positions. So I would say that it is "very usual"; it stems from thinking long and hard about those positions, either during games or while studying; it ...


7

Playing slow is not a bad thing, the longer the games you play the more you will learn. I am 2200+ for blitz (and bullet) but I don't learn much in these games. I know I should play at slower time controls if I want to improve my chess but I find blitz chess quite addictive! If you are happy playing 10 + 0 then stick with it (or even longer time controls if ...


6

That sentence is taken out of context. I copy here the text of the full paragraph, which answers your question: If the game is not to be played rigorously, according to the rules above mentioned, then moderate your desire of victory over your adversary, and be pleased with one over yourself. Snatch not eagerly at every advantage offered by his unskilfulness ...


6

The special feature of a 1.e4 repertoire is that transpositions are rare. You can have independent repertoires against each of black's replies. This is very different from 1.c4, 1.d4 and 1.Nf3 where moves can often be played in many different orders and you always have to watch out for transpositions between your various lines. Then these are the "big ...


6

The first question that needs answering is the following: what is your current playing level? The Grand Prix, and other anti-sicilians as well, can be a good way to trip up some sicilian players at lower to intermediate levels, but once your level of play gets higher these anti-sicilians will start getting less and less successful; there is a reason why they ...


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