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3

I found another, far funnier, reason why a piece can't be removed; the position would otherwise be illegal! Using this idea, I've managed 19 pieces. White's pieces can't be taken, with the White king unmoveable, or else the checkmate is null. Black's pieces prevent illegality and "guard" c4, minus the e6 block. [FEN "8/2B1R3/1N1rnp2/1Qq1knR1/...


1

Henrik Juel's three "add pieces" problems listed above (together with a fourth one) are all to be found, together with detailed solutions in PDB, using the query: a='juel' and K='add pieces'. Here is the superb fourth one, with its surprising solution... [Title "Henrik Juel. Probleemblad, 5/1997. Add a unit. What was the last move?"] [FEN ...


1

There are literally thousands of retro problems at https://pdb.dieschwalbe.de, accessible through the easy-to-use query interface. There are already discussions for many of the most interesting ones, and if you have any questions or comments, you can just add your own.


1

Lichess generates puzzles from your games automatically.


4

I found this reddit post which has two comments which answer this question. link https://tactics.bitcrafter.net/ This is essentially exactly what I was looking for and bonus points in that I think I found their github that has their code which seems shockingly simple link I made something like that, both open source http://chesstacticsgenerator.vitomd.com/ ...


7

Lichess has the "learn from your mistakes" feature, which can be used to play your significantly bad moves in a game as a puzzle. From your profile, select a variant/time control on the left, then click "view the games" in the top right. Click on a game, go to the analysis board, and at the bottom, in the "computer analysis" ...


10

I don't know of a single program that does all that. I do it myself with following steps. I save most of my games in a pgn file. The interesting ones, esp. my losses, are analyzed by Stockfish. The "blunder threshold" is your choice, typically 3 - 5 pawns or more. With Notepad++ text editor I enter the FEN of the position in a pgn file, of course ...


4

47 points Some insights. Pawns only attack forwards, so sticking them in the back and forming a 'tree' seems to work. Bishops and knights can attack backwards so they can be at the top. (There's one pawn that can be switched with a bishop here and the bishop would go from 2->4 and the pawn would go from 2->0) I feel like there could be some tricks ...


2

My attempt: 43 points I thought about the max points each piece can get. All the pieces are tricky in their own way. The king is tricky because anything it touches is a point, but nothing that touches it gets a point. So ideally surrounded by things that don't touch it. Knights are tricky too because they can have so many points, but only if the pieces are ...


2

Very nice puzzle !


1

There is a very obvious start with the double check Ne2. After that you just need to spot that the h8 rook is lined up on the king's only square, h1. The only problem is how to clear the white pawn and black bishop off the file to give checkmate: [fen "5r1r/ppk3p1/8/2bB4/3n4/7b/PP4PP/RN1QR1K1 b - - 0 1"] 1. Ne2+ Kh1 2. Ng3+ hxg3 3. Bg4++


24

If White can get the Black king to the first rank, then it will not be fast enough to catch the g-pawn from promoting. White starts by playing 1. Qg5, and after 1...Kh7 2. Qf6 Kg8 3. Qh6, the White queen can simply imitate the Black king's movements until she can start forcing the king down towards the first rank. [FEN "7k/8/8/8/6p1/4QpPb/5PpP/6K1 w - -...


12

I'm not sure about the fastest checkmate, but this should be the general procedure: Then Black After


8

This puzzle needs more love, so I post my best position (46): [FEN "8/8/2PN4/1PKB4/2PRNB2/2PRQ1P1/3PPP2/8 w - - 0 1"] Since just a record attempt is hardly an answer, here some tips for those who want to beat it: R (and less so Q) are no problem, just put them in the mid of the fray. B can easily have at least 3. K should also have a crowded place....


10

So white obviously has to start with Then, So [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 {Queen is on black, so the pawn goes to white! Now we keep it that way} Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. h5 Qa2 5. h6 Qa1 6. h7 Qa2 7. h8=N Qa1 8. Ng6 Qa2 9. Ne5 Qa1 10. Nd7 Qa2 11. Nxc5 Qa1 12. Na4 Qa2 13. Nb6 Qa1 14. Nxc4 Qa2 15. Na5 Qa1 ...


14

First, Then Meanwhile [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h4 Qa2 3. h5 Qa1 4. h6 Qa2 5. h7 Qa1 6. h8=N Qa2 7. Ng6 Qa1 8. Ne5 Qa2 9. Nxc4 Qa1 10. Na5 c4 11. Nxc4 Qa2 12. Na5 Qa1 13. Nxb3# However, So let's try [FEN "8/8/8/2p5/1pp5/brpp4/qpprpK1P/1nkbn3 w - - 0 1"] 1. Kxe1 Qa1 2. h3 Qa2 3. h4 Qa1 4. ...


1

Castling is an incredibly useful in chess: three moves in one. So we don't have to hunt far for reasons why it can be the best move strategically. One common comparison is between the castling and the rook move to the d file or f file. Basically the king may need to move offensively, or defensively: to cover a flight square for bK, to attack a pieces (...


26

OK The check must come from the knight (D'uh!) The black king must be on c5 for the mate The white king must be used to cover any empty squares to the right of the black king - thus the white king must move, thus there must be at least one non-checking move On a non-checking move Black can try to release the prison by Ra4 The only way white can cover this ...


68

It's checkmate in 20 moves. White's queens circle around the board giving checks, and Black interposes horizontally/vertically moving pieces. Black only has one choice because the other piece is pinned from the previous check. That goes well, until the pawn needs to move sideways: [FEN "3Q4/7Q/3rp3/2rkr3/2rrr3/7K/8/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Qb7+ Rc6 2. Qa5+...


2

Of course, promoting all the pawns to queens must be done. Creating sixteen passed pawns requires sacking eight pieces, four per side. The sacked pieces should be the knights and bishops to preserve the higher value pieces. From there, it's merely an "Onward, ho!" to a total point value of 182, which comes from the nines queens and two rooks on ...


4

Here's an 8.5 move sequence that leaves no squares: [fen "r3kb1r/pp1nq1pp/4b2n/2pppp2/1P1P1P2/N6P/P1P1P1PR/RNBQKB2 b Qkq - 0 1"] 1. d4 d5 2. b4 c5 3. f4 e5 4. h3 f5 5. Nf3 Be6 6. Nfd2 Nd7 7. Nc4 Nh6 8. Nca3 Qe7 9. Rh2 Edit: 7.5 moves (see comments) [fen "rnbqkb2/p1p1p1pr/Q6p/1p1p1p2/2PPnP2/4B2N/PP1NP1PP/R3KB1R b KQq - 3 8"] 1. c4 b5 2. ...


5

Playing around with Laska's board position, here is a 10 move sequence that gets there (with some pieces moved around): [fen "rnbq1bn1/p2pp1p1/1p2k1Br/2p4p/6PP/1NPP1p1N/PP2PP2/R1BQK2R b KQ - 1 10"] 1. d3 c5 2. c3 h5 3. g4 Rh6 4. h4 f5 5. Nh3 Kf7 6. Bg2 f4 7. Be4 Ke6 8. Bg6 f3 9. Nd2 b6 10. Nb3


9

TL;DR: a solution! [FEN "rnbq1bn1/p2pp1p1/1p2r1Nk/2p4p/6PN/1BPP1p1P/PP2PP2/R1BQK2R w - - 0 1"] 32 pieces, no squares. According to OEIS sequence A240443 and this particular pair of examples, 34 is the maximum possible number of square-free points on an 8x8 grid. As long as each file has at least two points in ranks 2-6, this is likely to give us a ...


7

A rule of thumb for these kind of positions that capturing an officer will allow a pair of pawns to pass one another and potentially promote. Capturing a pawn will allow three other pawns to become passed. So you can see that there is easily enough missing pieces to have created this position. If the issue is that pawns have moved sideways, then the ...


36

Even though the board is upside down, the position is still easily legal. [FEN ""] [startply "86"] [StartFlipped "1"] 1. a4 h5 2. g4 h4 3. Bg2 Rh5 4. gxh5 h3 5. h6 e5 6. Nf3 Bc5 7. Nxe5 hxg2 8. h4 Ne7 9. h5 g5 10. Rh4 Ng6 11. Rf4 g4 12. Rxf7 Qh4 13. e3 Bxe3 14. Ke2 a5 15. f4 Qf2+ 16. Kd3 Nc6 17. b4 b5 18. bxa5 Rxa5 19. Rf8+ Ke7 ...


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