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12

The longest K + Q + Q vs K mate whilst maintaining optimality is a mate in 4.


0

Now, there is a theoretical option where the whole game is a sequence of "!" moves. This requires two computers which play a perfect game, which is currently impossible. However, we can reach a long streak through forced moves.


13

It's going to be hard for any position to be "natural" if the king is out and roaming about, so I presume that you mean that the position must be legal. Also, as far as I understand it, the king may only teleport in a checkmate position, and not while in check, because otherwise it would be nigh impossible to give a mate. Firstly, it is entirely ...


4

The longest known checkmate problem composed by a human is dependent on a few criteria that are generally used by chess composers. Namely, it is a question of whether of not you want the problem to have a unique solution, meaning that there is only one possible solution with Black defending optimal, and if you want the position to be legal or not, meaning ...


1

White can get the rook out of the cage, and then it could threaten a capture. However, Black may attempt a perpetual check.


0

If we have 8 queens, White is checkmated. The same applies most of the time with 8 rooks, and you need a few more bishops.


1

This legal postion should fit the bill for the least amount of units needed and the least amoun fof moves. There is one king, one biship, and four pawns for each side-a total 12 pieces. The threefold repetition is forced no matter what moves the players make since they only have one legal move each time. It's basically your position, but is a legal and ...


4

See my book Fairy chess endings on an n x n chessboard (2017), chapter "Endings without the white king", p. 592 Especially: two knights and bishop against bare king, see p. 685. The ending is won only on a 7x7 chessboard, on boards 8x8 and greater the ending is drawn. three knights against bare king, see p. 706. The ending is drawn on a board of ...


1

More general answers: OEIS A172532: Number of ways to place 5 nonattacking knights on an n X n toroidal board. my book Non-attacking chess pieces (6ed, 2013), page 308, chapter "k Knights on an n x n toroidal chessboard".


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