New answers tagged

1

For Hauke, here is a "quiet" position as was challenged. :) [FEN "5kBK/5P1P/5P2/4nP2/5p1N/5Pp1/6P1/8 w - - 0 1"] 1. Ng6+ Nxg6+ 2. fxg6


12

Each side has 15 pieces that can be captured, for a total of 30 captures. But after the last pawn capture, there must be a pawn remaining on the board. Therefore, no more than 29 captures are possible. 29 pawn captures are possible through the following sequence. First, the knights are captured, followed by the rooks, bishops, queens, and lastly the pawns. ...


6

why exchanging the knight f3 is a blunder? It obviously isn't a blunder. I suspect you've made the mistake of thinking that if the website tells you that it evaluates Nxf3 as fractionally lower than Nxg2 then that means that Nxf3 is a blunder. It isn't. A blunder is when your large positive advantage turns negative. A blunder loses you the game from a ...


2

Example showing why the checking condition is needed to make this an interesting puzzle: [FEN "k7/Pp4p1/1P6/8/8/6p1/1P4Pp/7K w KQkq - 0 1"] Whoever moves, the game soon ends in stalemate, and either side may be stalemated thanks to the double-move option.


2

Since Evergalo asked, I also post a solution, where neither side is in check at the start. Problem chess etiquette says that everything that the composer does not rule out explicitly isn't cheating - for example, I used a promoted bishop, since bPh7 makes the pawn structure illegal - but ingenuity. Thus I immediately accepted the answer, especially as the &...


5

There are no infinite sequences; in fact, I'll show that there is no loop even on an infinite board. Thanks to Umlin for starting the proof, and alphacapture for getting me thinking about monovariants. Terminology: I will say two squares are "in line" with each other if they lie on a common rank, file, or diagonal. A "direct" check is ...


9

I am not sure if this is exactly what you are asking for, but here is a try. [FEN "8/8/8/2p1p1p1/2P1PkP1/4Q1RB/3PPpPp/3n1Kbr b - - 0 1"] [startflipped ""] 1... Nxe3+ 2.fxe3+ {2.Rxe3} Kxe4 {2...Kxg3} 3.Rf3 Black to move has only one legal move: 1...Nxe3 check. Now: 2.Rxe3 immediately stalemates Black. 2.dxe3 Kxe4 3.Rf3 stalemates Black ...


7

Using a bit of wizardry to abuse the 50-move rule, I make n equal 3844. This is certainly toppable. In this position, White has a mate in one at any point and all of Black's moves are forced. White has 45 pawns moves and 14 pieces to sacrifice. The Black knight capture adds on extra move. This allows for (45+14)*50+1=3842 moves to be added on. [FEN "7k/...


3

Many solutions indeed exist. The hard part is actually finding one. All pieces must be intertwined. With a few promoted bishops, I have managed to find one. It can be reached in 55 moves. [FEN ""] [startply "110"] 1. h4 g5 2. hxg5 h6 3. Rxh6 Rh7 4. f4 Rg7 5. f5 Rg6 6. fxg6 e6 7. gxf7+ Ke7 8. Nf3 Kd6 9. Nh4 Ke5 10. fxg8=B Kf4 11. a4 b5 12....


Top 50 recent answers are included