7

Forget the engines. We are humans (hopefully) and are only interested in how human's play. The King's Indian Defence (KID), a favorite opening of Tal, Fischer and Kasparov (and now played by Nakamura), has a reputation of being unsound by the engines (some positions are +1 and even +1.5) however for white playing precisely is very difficult. For instance, ...


6

A lichess study would be a good way to do this.


6

The whole point of hypermodern openings like the Benoni is to encourage a big center. If you don't get that you'd probably be better off playing something else. The Dutch leads to unbalanced positions, avoids transpositions and can be learned very quickly. The Tarrasch also. Those sound like better choices.


5

You're right that drawing lines don't really affect people who are lower rated. However, your bar for 2500 isn't practical. Most people who are close to master rated (say 2100+, and even some lower rated) will have memorized some of the main drawing lines in their main weapons. That being said, there's a huge difference between playing openings that give you ...


4

I’m not sure if a correspondence chess thematic tournament is the right place for learning the basics of an opening. For obtaining good results, i recommend: Know your opening. Study all available grandmaster games, try to understand their plans. Get help by an engine, a book and/or a strong player. Be aware that the winning percentage of a line in a ...


3

I prefer to use Graphviz ( either in the online editor or downloadable software. You can create a flowchart with all moves and transpositions, here is an example : This is an excellent answer which explains how to use it. If you have difficulty in visualize moves without the board, you can add screenshots of important position in the flowchart. Lichess ...


3

When chess players reach a certain level, they will know how to play against non mainstream openings(often also they can figure many things over the board as well). Therefore, if you play anything other than e4,d4,Nf3, or c4, the black player will be fine as the other moves are objectively not as good and white will find it hard to get any edge. So basically ...


3

I don't see a "drawish" opening line as a concern. Every decisive game comes from a close to equal position, the starting position. Outplaying your opponent from an equal position to win is seen at all levels. My goal in opening is to get the kind of position I prefer to play. Some so called equal positions are easier to play for one side. The ...


3

I don't play correspondence chess myself (if I have occasionally it's without engines), but I have written a few opening books. The research aspect of both activities share some similarities. In the tournament, I'm assuming you're allowed to use engines and databases. I'd recommend getting the best engine available (Stockfish 12), downloading the updated ...


3

You should know how to evaluate an opening position- center, development, king safety. While an engine can be useful for missed tactics, I trust my own evaluation over any engine in the opening. Lopsided database scores can be a clue that the opening may be difficult for your opponent but they aren't perfect particularly at higher levels. Using a GM ...


3

If you don't feel comfortable playing against large centers you shouldn't play Benoni nor other openings such as KID (which both, by the way, are good choices if you look for imbalanced positions). I would recommend, based on the proximity of the tournament and your aim for imbalaced positions, to look at Von Hennig-Schara Gambit, which doesn't have a lot of ...


1

I used to use xChess on my Mac. It's a GUI, which allows you to input variations and comments to your heart's content. And also to use an engine. That's pretty much the extent of it, but definitely easier then writing lines into an text editor.


1

The way I do it is with chesstempo.com, their opening tool is incredibly useful!


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