35

The material balance is only temporary. After White goes c4, Black will lose a piece. If Qf5, White has f3 trapping the bishop. All alternatives to Qf5 leave a piece unprotected (for instance c4 Nxc4 Bxe4 Qxe4 Qxc4 +-) [Event "Chess Calculation: Chapter 1"] [Site "https://lichess.org/study/VFtoodiL/uG0A42Q9"] [Date "2021.09.12"] ...


26

I play the white side of this position often, and have an incredible winrate because to be honest, it feels very hard for black to develop naturally. Here's an example of how things can go wrong: [FEN ""] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. h4 h5 5. Bd3 Bxd3 6. Qxd3 e6 7. Bg5 Qb6 8. Nd2 c5 9. c4 Qxb2 10. Rd1 Qxd4 11. Qb3 Qxe5+ 12. Ne2 Qc7 13. cxd5 exd5 ...


19

It just seemed obvious to me that gambits would work better with faster games, for the same reasons as given in the comments - it's harder to defend than attack, etc. I tried looking at several gambits in the lichess database to support this theory. In classical+rapid games, White wins 53% of Evans Gambit games vs 43% for Black. In bullet+blitz games, it's ...


17

By playing 11...h6, you created a weakness on g6, and you created a target on h6, now it is easier for white to open up a position around your king by pushing their g-pawn. White also has a potential bishop sacrifice on h6. In general it is best to avoid pawn moves in front of your king, especially when facing a pawn storm.


11

I'm wondering if anyone has any general tips for how to make white feel this "bad knight" The fact that you manage to put "bad" and "bad knight" in scare quotes shows that there is some hope for you. White does not have a bad position. I suspect that this line isn't played much at master level because it isn't the best way to ...


11

To add to the existing answers, you just gave up your light squared bishop for no apparent reason, while creating many light square weaknesses around your king with the same move! Now white is the only player with a light squared bishop and you will have a tough defensive job if white plays correctly.


11

Why is h4 much better than h3? It's very simple. The prospects for the bishop are much better on g3 than h2. On h2 the bishop does nothing useful and it will take a lot of moves to get it back into the game via g1. Black will exert iron control over f4 with pawns on e5 and g5 making the freeing move f2-f4 impossible. On g3 the bishop has a role protecting ...


10

Smyslov Fischer Karpov Keres Anand Kramnik


10

Is his rating a limitation to teach me? No. As I say in this answer, "you are too fixated on rating". High rating does not guarantee coaching ability. Low rating does not preclude coaching ability. Today the guy in our club who does the most coaching is rated about 1900. 50 years ago, the first time we played for the same club, he was rated about ...


9

It might be not even as simple as the other answer suggests (regarding only objective evaluation), as "both lines are (roughly) equal" is probably already from a certain perspective. Let's view it specifically from the computer and the human eye and that we want to win the game. I outline only the central points. Computer, Variant 1: "I'm an ...


9

White's actually quite close to busted in that position after 16...Qd5. Of the two points you bring up, note that White doesn't actually control the e-file because Black is ready to play a rook to e8 and drive White's major pieces away. The knight on g5 looks good, but it's also vulnerable to being kicked by ...h6 and it's not threatening anything yet. ...


8

The main point of the engine recommending exd5 is because it opens up the diagonal from c8 to h3. By playing an early e6, the bad light squared bishop is really weak and has terrible scope, which is why taking with the e pawn could be followed with developing your bishop onto a square on a more open, free diagonal in the future. As long as you castle and don'...


8

It's not so simple. 1. Bf3 leads to a position where White is up an exchange. 1. Rb6 leads to a position where White is up two pawns. Both are worth roughly the same in terms of material. Look at the lines carefully: After 1. Bf3, Black does not have to play Bxc6. 1...Rxc6 2. Bxc6 Bxc6 -- White is up an exchange. After 1. Rb6 fxe4 2. Nd8+ K-wherever 3. ...


8

First, the human assessment: White has the advantage of his figures being already developed (Rxh7 is always to consider), but is saddled with a king that is in grave danger already after the natural e5. (To underline this: Black to move seems to have a clear win, placing the wK on e1 is a clear win for White.) The position thus is tactically "red-hot&...


7

Calling it an "inaccuracy" is nothing more than the engine saying that it evaluates the position after one move to be a certain amount better than after another move. It doesn't necessarily mean a move is "bad". Both d-pawns cannot be kept no matter what Black does. After 1...Ne4, if White plays Nxe4, the recapture will leave the c4 ...


7

Alexander Alekhine Aron Nimzowitsch Emanuel Lasker Akiba Rubenstein Siegbert Tarrasch And many, many more! You can analyze some of their games here!


7

After 10.h4 g4, the kingside pawn structure is more favorable for White. Black's g- and h-pawns are blocked, they are too far advanced and feel more weak than strong. Black doesn't have possibilies for a kingside attack because of the blocked pawns. White's king will be safe on g1 after castling short. This is the most important factor. Far advanced pawns ...


6

It seems that, for tactical reasons, White is going to have to give up material to stop Black's attack with best play from both sides. That seems to be why the evaluation is so in favor of Black. After move 16, White owns the e-file and maybe even the 7-rank. Not really. After 16...Qd5, White must defend the mate threat somehow, and Black can then play a ...


6

The "e" columns being open is not an issue for king safety. Your king is only there temporarely. After ...exd5, Black would probably follow with ...Bd6 and ...0-0, then at some point ...Re8 to exploit the semi-open file. ...cxd5 is a playable alternative, but your c8 bishop would become a much worse piece. It's hard to see how you'll liberate him ...


5

The knight is badly misplaced on c3 here. If you protect your d5-pawn with ...e6, what is the knight supposed to do? It doesn't put any pressure on the d5-pawn since there are no White pawns helping to attack it. If White's c-pawn were on c4 then the knight would be completely fine on c3. But now, even if all of White's pieces were attacking the d5-pawn, it ...


4

White has easy ideas like 1. Nxe6 fxe6 2. Bxh6 gxh6 3. Qxh6 with ideas of Rh3 to g3.


4

This is a quite complicated position. It's not about "following a strategy" but rather about concrete calculation of different lines that could arise. Any "tiny" mistake by either side can lead to a huge change in evaluation (for example, White is threatening checkmate right now). Most players would prefer to have White here, since ...


4

Just what is so bad about the White knight and its position? 4. Nf6 for Black is the best option, with a slight theoretical edge in scoring probability in the endgames, although getting there would take accurate play. Additionally, there are many moves that look plausible that would fail to do well. Overall, the position is very drawish.


4

There are two key principles: Tactics can only flow from a superior position Dissipating tension early is usually bad What these tell us is that, first, it is important to follow sound general principles in the opening and early middlegame. So, develop your pieces, get your king safe and try and control the center. Developing tactics is going to be much ...


3

Josh says f5 ... Is Josh wrong about f5? Yes, although black's position is terrible in any case. If we look at the initial position and try and assess a number of things are immediately obvious: White has a lot more space All the pieces and all the pawns are still on the board We can also say: White has completed development Black still has several ...


3

Don't try to play like Tal unless you really understand how Tal played. For every brilliancy that gets regularly published there are many fine victories that are less spectacular and less well-known. Even Tal could not not just turn on the combinative tap at will. I strongly recommend reading The Art Of Attack in Chess by Vladimir Vukovic. An outstanding ...


3

My answer is to just play chess- playing on the queenside as normal is a good idea in this structure even without the pawn on c3, since here you get to knock away the knight. Pressure versus d4 is also easier without a c3 pawn, which is nice. Black is better than normal, but it's not really anything you can get a instant win from- this just doesn't even come ...


3

A really strong and great positional open source engine I have used is Rodent. The last version was Rodent IV and is available at http://www.pkoziol.cal24.pl/rodent/rodent.htm Of course Chess Programming wiki continues to be a good place to research and discover engines and the following link shows only open source engines. https://www.chessprogramming.org/...


3

Could someone please confirm that he became a stronger player by using that method of studying? I can confirm, I was 2000-FIDE, struggling to beat players of the same rating. After a month of serious endgame study, I increased my rating to 2200 fairly quickly. Since then, I am continuously studying endgames. A lot of players at that level have a gap in their ...


3

Is there any broad-brushed strategy for either side that would gradually but decisively achieve victory? Sounds like what you are really asking here is "Can black survive long enough, without giving back too much material, to take advantage of the extra material to win." That's because white's winning strategy would have to be to checkmate black ...


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